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So Long, Spahnie

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  • So Long, Spahnie

    No, it's not baseball, but before I had any track heroes, Warren Spahn was my favorite pitcher, and I couldn't not tip a hat to him at his passing.

    Imagine what his numbers might have been had he not--like Ted Williams--given a chunk of his youth to serving his country. (Wounded as one of the first guys across the Remagen Ridge, as I recall from reading his biography in junior high.)

  • #2
    Re: So Long, Spahnie

    Wow - you ARE old - he was my father's favorite pitcher (82 y.o.)!

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    • #3
      Re: So Long, Spahnie

      Mine too.

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      • #4
        Re: So Long, Spahnie

        I remember Spahn, but being a long time Cubs fan he was definitely not my favorite!

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        • #5
          Re: So Long, Spahnie

          >Wow - you ARE old - he was my father's favorite
          >pitcher (82 y.o.)!>>

          Considering that I was far from born (indeed, my parents hadn't even met yet) when Spahn made his major league debut, I'm not quite ready for the scrap heap yet. He had a long career and he caught my fancy at a young age.

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          • #6
            Re: So Long, Spahnie

            I was hoping someone would post something about him. Didn't win his first game until he was 25 and still won more than any leftie and this AFTER winning a Purple Heart which is already enough to get him into the Hall of Fame of life.


            "Warren Spahn, the winningest left-handed pitcher in history with 363 wins, served three years as a combat engineer during World War II. Spahn saw action during the Battle of the Bulge, was wounded in the foot and survived the collapse of the Remagen Bridge in Germany.

            "The Green Light Letter proves that baseball is a part of the American way," said Spahn. "The game, that tradition and the love affair that the American public has for baseball survived, and it always will." Spahn returned from the war with three battle stars, a citation for bravery and a Purple Heart. Spahn also earned a battlefield commission as second lieutenant, the only major league player to earn such an honor."



            http://www.baseballhalloffame.org/histo ... 030918.htm

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            • #7
              Re: So Long, Spahnie

              >I remember Spahn, but being a long time Cubs fan
              >he was definitely not my favorite!

              What difference did it make? Bob Buhl could have been just as effective against the Cubbies of that era.

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              • #8
                Re: So Long, Spahnie

                Yes, dj I agree with you on the uselessness of the Cubs while Spahn was pitching. (Remember their rotating managers during the 1961 season?) Except for Ernie Banks they were awful. Actually the real Chicago team during that period were the White Sox, at least until Al Lopez retired in 1967.

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                • #9
                  Re: So Long, Spahnie

                  I'm just about positive that Spahn pitched for the BOSTON Braves (of course) in the first game I ever saw, at age 8, at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn. Against Vic Lombardi, as I recall. Don't think I took my Whitlow Wyatt mitt to the game. My grandfather took my brother and me. He also "officiated" my first race (gotta get a Track connection in here), against my brother - the full perimeter of the Parade Grounds in Brooklyn, a mile. I was about 8 then too and my brother a year and a half older. He nipped me - but threw up. A Pyrrhic victory for him?

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