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  • 4:24-miler
    replied
    Re: Re:

    Originally posted by Gebrucilassie
    No they didn't convert. I believe the new coach wanted to crow that his runners were all the record holders. I believe one of "his" guys ran a mid 4:25 1600 in the mid 80's yet our mile record was 4:17 from 1971!! Not even close!!! At least he couldn't screw the field event record holders :wink:
    That is just asinine. :roll:

    Leave a comment:


  • jhc68
    replied
    Re: Old High School Records

    That's one dumb-ass coach! The more tradition and meaning you build into the program the better, IMHO... that includes ancient history in the record books.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gebrucilassie
    replied
    Re: Re:

    [quote=4:24-miler]
    Originally posted by Gebrucilassie
    Originally posted by "Mighty Favog":3ji3j2wd
    Our city championship lists the meet record as 10.3. While the timing was not suspect (he went on to be a MAC champion at EMU), the wind was probably +9.0 or greater (20 mph). Then there's the 1600m record, which is slower than the best time made at 1 mile. You know you're not working with the brightest of people when their eyes begin to glaze over while you explain that a mile is actually further than 1600 meters, so the old record should stand, and they come back with "But it's not 1600 meters". Arrrgh!
    I hear you. At my HS a few years after I graduated, they switched to the 1600. Basically they did away with all yard marks. So even though the records from 440 on up were wiped away and to this day I believe there are inferior marks as "school records" Arrrgh indeed!!!
    They didn't convert the mile times to meters or vice versa? My school's 4:13.4 mile is an actual mile. So for a current runner to break the "mile" record in the 1,600m they'd have run 4:11.9 or lower.[/quote:3ji3j2wd]

    No they didn't convert. I believe the new coach wanted to crow that his runners were all the record holders. I believe one of "his" guys ran a mid 4:25 1600 in the mid 80's yet our mile record was 4:17 from 1971!! Not even close!!! At least he couldn't screw the field event record holders :wink:

    Leave a comment:


  • 4:24-miler
    replied
    Re: Re:

    [quote=Conor Dary]
    Originally posted by "4:24-miler":2tzr1huf
    They didn't convert the mile times to meters or vice versa? My school's 4:13.4 mile is an actual mile. So for a current runner to break the "mile" record in the 1,600m they'd have run 4:11.9 or lower.
    Convert? Most coaches and ADs still don't understand that a mile is actually farther than 1600 meters.[/quote:2tzr1huf]
    LoL! :lol:

    Leave a comment:


  • GeorgiaFan1
    replied
    Re: Old High School Records

    Our neighborhood high school merged into the adjacent neighborhood's high school. We had had outstanding track teams with some all-class state records and some times still in the top ten all-time in the state. They dropped our records. Cool, huh?

    Leave a comment:


  • Conor Dary
    replied
    Re: Re:

    Originally posted by 4:24-miler
    They didn't convert the mile times to meters or vice versa? My school's 4:13.4 mile is an actual mile. So for a current runner to break the "mile" record in the 1,600m they'd have run 4:11.9 or lower.
    Convert? Most coaches and ADs still don't understand that a mile is actually farther than 1600 meters.

    Leave a comment:


  • 4:24-miler
    replied
    Re: Re:

    Originally posted by Gebrucilassie
    Originally posted by Mighty Favog
    Our city championship lists the meet record as 10.3. While the timing was not suspect (he went on to be a MAC champion at EMU), the wind was probably +9.0 or greater (20 mph). Then there's the 1600m record, which is slower than the best time made at 1 mile. You know you're not working with the brightest of people when their eyes begin to glaze over while you explain that a mile is actually further than 1600 meters, so the old record should stand, and they come back with "But it's not 1600 meters". Arrrgh!
    I hear you. At my HS a few years after I graduated, they switched to the 1600. Basically they did away with all yard marks. So even though the records from 440 on up were wiped away and to this day I believe there are inferior marks as "school records" Arrrgh indeed!!!
    They didn't convert the mile times to meters or vice versa? My school's 4:13.4 mile is an actual mile. So for a current runner to break the "mile" record in the 1,600m they'd have run 4:11.9 or lower.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gebrucilassie
    replied
    Re:

    Originally posted by Mighty Favog
    Our city championship lists the meet record as 10.3. While the timing was not suspect (he went on to be a MAC champion at EMU), the wind was probably +9.0 or greater (20 mph). Then there's the 1600m record, which is slower than the best time made at 1 mile. You know you're not working with the brightest of people when their eyes begin to glaze over while you explain that a mile is actually further than 1600 meters, so the old record should stand, and they come back with "But it's not 1600 meters". Arrrgh!
    I hear you. At my HS a few years after I graduated, they switched to the 1600. Basically they did away with all yard marks. So even though the records from 440 on up were wiped away and to this day I believe there are inferior marks as "school records" Arrrgh indeed!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • 4:24-miler
    replied
    Re: Old High School Records

    These aren't as old as some of the other records posted but my high school's mile and 2-mile go back a ways.

    Mile: 4:13.4, 1965
    2-Mile: 9:17.1 1971

    Leave a comment:


  • mrzipityduda
    replied
    Re: Old High School Records

    In 1957 I jumped 13' 7"class "F" BROAD JUMP....... Burbank Jr HS in LA, CA.....LOL still stands

    Leave a comment:


  • Cooter Brown
    replied
    I do know they measured after the jump then so maybe that was it. He may have been going for 14'2" or 14'3" but the post jump measurement was 14'1 1/2".

    I don't know if there was another vaulter still in the competition at the record height so he could've been forced to the height above 14'. I vaguely remember him setting a meet record en route of around 13'9". A 6" progression would put it at 14'3" for the next bar.

    Leave a comment:


  • dukehjsteve
    replied
    re the above mention of progression upwards of the bar other than to a height you would expect, we ran into this at the Indiana State meet in 2008. 2 guys were left ,and they both had cleared a height I believe 3 inches below the meet record. They asked to have the bar raised 4 inches, so they could shoot at a distinct NEW meet record, but since there were 2 guys left, not just one, they were mandated by the rules to stick to the normal 3 inch progression. They missed 3 times so no matter.

    re the above, I may have the exact mathematics wrong, but the point is... when there is more than 1 competitor left, there is no flexibility in the next height attempted.... you follow the prior progression.

    Leave a comment:


  • dj
    replied
    Re: Old High School Records

    [quote=Cooter Brown]
    Originally posted by "Pentathlete 2":3upslnhn
    I was there 84-88 and we sure as heck didn't measure in meters, so I guess this is a 2M time.
    This made me wonder, did high schools at one time briefly adopt metric measurements?

    My high school had a guy who was the first to vault 14' in Texas back in '63. It was at the state championship but his mark was 14' 1 1/2" or better known as 4.30m. He was my coach in HS and when I asked him why he went for that instead of 14' he said that it was the next bar in the progression.[/quote:3upslnhn]

    I think there are two much more likely possibilities than a metric measure back in 1963.

    1) The progression was going 6 or 3 inches at a time with the aim of bettering the existing meet record by 1/4 or 1/2 inch, hence the odd setting at 14-1 1/2.

    2) The pegs only went up in full inch intervals, but bar sag or the placement of the bottom of the uprights relative to the top of the box either raised or lowered the bar from the desired height and what might have been set at 14-3 was actually known to be 14-1 1/2. They would have been subtracting 1 1/2 inches from each bar setting. Or whatever the known difference was.

    Again, those just seem to be the likely possibilities. I'd bet an awful lot against it being a metric setting.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cooter Brown
    replied
    Re: Old High School Records

    Originally posted by Pentathlete 2
    I was there 84-88 and we sure as heck didn't measure in meters, so I guess this is a 2M time.
    This made me wonder, did high schools at one time briefly adopt metric measurements?

    My high school had a guy who was the first to vault 14' in Texas back in '63. It was at the state championship but his mark was 14' 1 1/2" or better known as 4.30m. He was my coach in HS and when I asked him why he went for that instead of 14' he said that it was the next bar in the progression.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Old High School Records

    Originally posted by Anonymous
    It seems clear that the LJ is the t&f event that is most resistant to "innovation" or technical progress. There have been no dramatic stylistic innovations in it at all (obviously nothing remotely comparable to the flop in the HJ), and of course no technical innovations (nothing like the fiberglass pole in PV, etc.). It is remarkable that Jesse Owens would still be a good, national-class long jumper today, nearly 70 years later.
    The oldest T&F recond at my high school is also the LJ.

    Roger Moore 21' 11.5" in 1961

    Second oldest: 3200m Frank Turner 9:28.1 1978
    I was there 84-88 and we sure as heck didn't measure in meters, so I guess this is a 2M time.

    100m recond was set in '09 at 11.54

    Leave a comment:

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