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Steers First Over 7 Feet?

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  • #16
    Re: Steers First Over 7 Feet?

    I must confess that I incorrectly made this original post in the current events file, as it was inspired by the current event of Charlie Dumas having died. My mistake!

    I am willing to accept whatever penalty I have coming.

    But for Garry to needle me makes me think he is still smarting from me mispelling his name with only one "r" in an earlier post.

    Hey Garry, baby, my name is Barry, and guess what name came on my renewal of T & F News?

    "Garry" Irwin.

    So I think we are even.

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: Steers First Over 7 Feet?

      Re sprung floors, and "Joe Indian's" mention of Maples Pavilion, Stanford is pulling that floor out.

      http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercuryn ... 716113.htm

      what's not in the on-line version is the diagram that was in the paper which showed (of interest to engineers only?)

      <<4 layers of crisscrossing beams are spaced so that no one beam is directly under another, and no point on the floor connects directly with the concrete foundation>>

      bottom layer: 2x4s, 4ft apart
      second layer: 3x3s, 12 inches apart
      third layer 3x3s, 8ft apart
      top layer 2x4s, 4ft apart

      The the floor itself on top of that.

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: Steers First Over 7 Feet?

        I'm temporarily reviving this thread simply to add a tidbit of historical trivia to the story. I noticed the following in the May 1954 issue of "Athletics World":

        "At Commerce, Texas, another epoch-opening mark was made when the 23 year old 6'7" tall 171 lbs. Chuck Holding cleared a bar at 7 feet in training on April 24th. In fact what happened was that Dr. Hawthorne, Director of Physical Education at East Texas State, set the bar at what he thought was 7 ft. 2 ins. Holding hit it but it did not fall. On remeasurement, it was found to be exactly at 7 feet! Holding's attempt to repeat the feat at San Marcos, Tex., on May 1 amounted to 'only' 6'7-1/2"."

        Holding was a very good jumper, with seasonal bests of 6'9-3/4" for the previous couple years.

        It may be a good thing Holding didn't make it officially. We all know about "Volzing" the pole vault bar. "Holding" the HJ bar sounds blatantly illegal...

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        • #19
          Re: Steers First Over 7 Feet?

          I can remember back in high school meets, on windy days, if someone did not hold those light aluminum crossbars at both ends. they would slide off the top of the metal standards. Then they would also sometimes wrap tape around the ends of the crossbar to make it stick better, even reversing the last time around to have sticky side out. Bottom line was that as the jumper went over the two people holding the bar would let go at the last instant then it was up to the official to decide if the wind knocked it off or the jumper. Hardly a precise science.

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          • #20
            Re: Steers First Over 7 Feet?

            But the best part of the old aluminum crossbars was that they got so bent and saggy that people could get some really great PR's just by measuring the bar at the most advantages place along it's length. Of course, jumpers deserved some perks to compensate for having to get pounded, scraped and covered with rashes landing in saw-dust pits!

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            • #21
              Re: Steers First Over 7 Feet?

              re: advantageous

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              • #22
                Re: Steers First Over 7 Feet?

                >But the best part of the old aluminum crossbars was that they got so bent and
                >saggy that people could get some really great PR's just by measuring the bar at
                >the most advantages place along it's length. Of course, jumpers deserved some
                >perks to compensate for having to get pounded, scraped and covered with rashes
                >landing in saw-dust pits!

                Any advantage was countered by the pain caused when you hit it after take off and landed on the damn thing (when flopping)!

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: Steers First Over 7 Feet?

                  I remember the sawdust pits all too well, and, as I've commented here before, even a few sand "pits" (with the HJ standards simply set alongside the LJ pit!) Ouch. Needless, to say, this predated any thought of the flop. A bar set at 5'6" or 5'8" looks surprisingly high without a 3-foot high foam pad right behind it.

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                  • #24
                    Re: Steers First Over 7 Feet?

                    >But the best part of the old aluminum crossbars was that they got so bent and
                    >saggy that people could get some really great PR's just by measuring the bar at
                    >the most advantages place along it's length.

                    You mean by cheating? Every U.S. rulebook specified that the bar was to be measured from its lowest point.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: Steers First Over 7 Feet?

                      All depends on what level of competition you're talking about. I don't think I ever saw a tape used in any meet I competed in through high school, and am pretty sure there were even some collegiate meets conducted without.

                      Without=the standards simply had a set of holes, or a gradated scale with a clamp, and the bar was raised by using these markers, rather than any attempt to actually measure its new height.

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                      • #26
                        Re: Steers First Over 7 Feet?

                        I remember high school dual meets where the official would straighten the bar as best he could, but then he'd always pull out a tape for the measurement. The frustrating thing was when the bar would get bent in the middle of jumping at a height and he'd straighten the bar, measure it, the adjust the clamps on the standards to try to make it even to what everyone else had jumped at.

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                        • #27
                          Re: Steers First Over 7 Feet?

                          Those old bars used to get so torqued and tweaked and pretzled around... it was like an art form trying to leverage them against something to straighten them out. Some people were master craftsmen at it.
                          As for cheating at measurement, well, as g.h. said it was dependent on the level of competition and the situation. Lots of times whole high school meets would go by with bars sagging by monumental amounts and officials content to just mark down whatever the standards happened to indicate without any measurement at all.
                          Anyone remember the old wooden crossbars? They still sagged but they didn't bend. They were cool except that they would break under the force of a heavy sneeze.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Re: Steers First Over 7 Feet?

                            In Norway where I grew up and did my jumping in the 50s and early 60s we only used wooden bars. They broke easily but there were always lots of them around. It's strange but it seems to me that certain jumpers broke much more bars than others. But in meets heights were always measured apart from elementary school meets.
                            When I moved to Canada and my kids got involved in the sport I could not believe how akward and cumbersome most of the H.J. standards were compared to what I saw in Scandinavia about 25 years earlier.

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                            • #29
                              Steers first over seven feet?

                              On 27 Feb '41, Steers jumped in the ten minutes between halves of a basketball game in Eugene. He jumped in "tennis sneakers" and, wth his sweats on, took three or four warm-ups at 6' 2". He jumped 6' 4" and then took off his sweats as the bar went to 6' 6". Next was 6' 8" and then 6' 10". All on first attempts, at 6' 11" he missed once, consulted with his coach Bill Hayward and cleared. The bar was then set "as high as it would stretch" and Steers was over "with three inches to spare". The officials measured and remeasured and announced 7' 0 1/8". Four months later, somewhere in the midwest (on his way to the AAU champs in Philadelphia), Bill Stewart cleared a measured (by spectating Earle Meadows and Payton Jordan) 7' 0 1/4" three times using three styles. Chuck Holding's 7' 0" at East Texas State in Commerce was mentioned. Czechoslovakia's Jiri Lansky reportedly cleared 7' 0 1/4" in practice indoors in March '55 about two months before the Olympic champ Walt Davis got over 7' 0" on 7th May in Houston. Eight days later, Davis did it again in Beaumont, Texas. Those exhibitions/practice sessions predated Charles Dumas' 7' 0 5/8" at the '56 FOT.

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