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Carl Lewis 30ft Long Jump

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  • #31
    Re: Carl Lewis 30ft Long Jump

    One other question about Pedroso: Is he really 1.72m tall as often listed?

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    • #32
      Re: Carl Lewis 30ft Long Jump

      >One other question about Pedroso: Is he really 1.72m tall as often listed?

      I've seen him listed as 1.76, which seems more plausible (though still short)
      Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

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      • #33
        Re: Carl Lewis 30ft Long Jump

        You guys are bringing back fond memories!

        I was 12yrs old when Carl "fouled" that jump. I'll never forget it. My family was driving back from a track meet and I couldn't get home fast enough. Once we reached home I sprinted up the stairs, flipped on the tv and there was Carl at the top of the runway. He flies down and launches himself out to what I still believe was 30ft. Truly amazing. In fact, if memory serves me, Carl had one of the most amazing meets in history as he ran 19.75 with his hands in the air at 200m. Wicked!

        Speaking of amazing, does anyone remember when Carl beat Larry Myricks in the rain in Indianapolis? I think Larry was leading with 8.74m and Carl stood poised at the end of the runway with the rain pouring down his face. He takes off, lands and immediately puts his hands up in victory. His jump: 8.76m! Badass!!!!

        Anyway, back to the conversation, I think it is really interesting to see the impact of vertical speed on the final distance of these great jumpers. It would seem that the faster one can "get up", the better angle of inclination. I guess this is what we recognize as an athlete having "pop'. Clearly Pedroso and Lamela have pop. Just take a look at the '95 World Championships and you'll see how quickly Pedroso elevates. He may may not have the speed of a Lewis or Powell, but he sure has pop. The only guy I can think of who rivals Pedroso in this area would be Emmiyan. Not that's a jumper who used to get up!

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        • #34
          Re: Carl Lewis 30ft Long Jump

          I know Carl and I heard about his jump of 30'. When I was in high school I jumped near 25' at the State meet and did not foul and put my spikes in the spike marks, the official put cardboard on my toe and said the angle was just over 90 degrees but he wasn't sure, so ruled it a foul. I don't think there was such a rule. When I jumped at the Conference championships in 1963 I jumped over 26' and did not foul (one inch back) and put my foot in my spike marks but the officials ruled I didn't have my balance even though I exited the pit at a proper angle, I was jumping about wild about my first 26' jump. I was depressed all day because with two other fouls I didn't make the finals in the competition, then I got my chance to jump at Modesto that night against Ralph Boston. the rest is known I jumped 27' 4" and measured the wind before I jumped by throwing grsss up in the air to see if the wind was blowing. In high school I was jumping 2 feet beyond the other jumpers, in the conference meet I jump 4' beyond the next jumper at that time. I think it is hard for officials to accept something unbelievable. A bad scientist will see something which doesn't fit the theory and throw it out because it doesn't make since. I feel that is what happens sometimes with the LJ. I feel that if these legal jumps were allowed things would have been different for my WR. At that time there was a belief that one one except Ralph could jump that far and there are some even with evidence can't accept the unusual. I think that is what happened with Carl, it is like seeing a UFO. By the way Carl was a meditator like me and I think to get into those spaces requires going inside yourself to understand space and time. I ran from 133' Tom Tellex got Carl to move it back to 190' and made the LJ from a jumping event into a sprint with low trajectory.

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          • #35
            Re: Carl Lewis 30ft Long Jump

            Why would there possibly have been a mindset that nobody but Ralph Boston could jump that far? In 1963 he wasn't even the world record holder Igor Ter-Ovanesyan was having taken it away from Boston the year before.

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            • #36
              Re: Carl Lewis 30ft Long Jump

              Realist: Leon Glover, Jr and Senior, the wind gauge officials at Modesto told me this. I feel T and F News is still acting this way with accounts from the stands and conditions after I jumped not the moment I jumped.You have to remember that is those days a 26' was very good and Ralph was the first to do 27', beyond him there really was no one. Ignoring my 26' jump that morning that was ruled "off balance" a 25' 5" would put you second or third behind Ralph. Everyone was posed to see Ralph go beyond Igor that night, third place was 25'8" so if I hadn't have jumped so well that night the belief was well founded. Gale Hopkins jumped 26' 9 1/2" at Eugene in 1964 to approach him but until then no one was near him. I did beat him at the Cow Palace the first indoor meet but pulled a hamstring that took until 1968 to heal and get back my speed. I said that on one in American, it was the belief, was capable of breaking the WR in the LJ and that was true until Beamon came along in 1968. I was injured and had to do five events in College every weekend and was a wreck at the end of the season. Sometimes with belief, reality doesn't effect the belief. Even after the 26' 10" jump I could see all the officials gathering on the LJ runway to see Ralph try to beat Igor. I don't think that Beamon had that belief because when I saw him in NY last week he said that of all the jumpers he feared me the most because he didn't know what I would do. Like Beamon in Mexico City I was inspired at Modesto but I feel that Tom Tellez made the difference for Carl who could jump well without getting all jazzed up, by constant speed practise all the time and not just peaking for a meet which we used to do. If you don't run fast in practise then you have to really get charged up to run fast but if you do it all the time it really isn't that big a deal.

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              • #37
                Re: Carl Lewis 30ft Long Jump

                I always wondered what Emmiyan could have done if his career hadn't fallen away after the personal disaster of the Armenian earthquake.

                He was the only man that could come between the talents of Lewis and Myricks at the time. He had jumps of 8.86, 8.65 and 8.53 at altitude in '88. Sea level bests of 8.61 '87 and 8.53 '88.

                Considering this guy was jumping these distances at 22 and 23 years of age (he was a real talent)and was on the up. And taking into account that many LJers don't reach their peak till about 28yrs- HOW FAR DO YOU HISTORICAL GUYS THINK HE COULD HAVE JUMPED?
                Refering to the 'pop' a previous message said he had.I remember a commentator swearing blind his hips were 8ft above the ground. Playing these tapes back at the time in slo-mo I was astounded by the lift he attained, it was Jordanesque but the Guy was only 5'10".
                I think he could have jumped regularly around 8.70 like Myricks, with a best of approximately 8.79/8.80 at sea level.

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                • #38
                  Re: Carl Lewis 30ft Long Jump

                  Correction to previous message: Make that at the ages of 21 and 22 for Emmiyan's best jumps.

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                  • #39
                    Re: Carl Lewis 30ft Long Jump

                    Emmiyan was a super talent. It's tough however to guess what he might have jumped. If memory serves me correctly, he came out of the Soviet style of training e.g. lots of plyos. This is really tough on the body unless of course you weigh next to nothing.

                    In a lot of ways, Pedroso reminds me of Emmiyan (different styles of course). Both aren't super fast but both are really quick. Both really elevate at take-off. My guess is that the Cuban system learned a lot from the Soviet system. The odd thing is you don't see many Cuban jumpers last in this system. Athletes from both shine brightly and then fade away (or hobble away).

                    If you use Pedroso as an indicator, I think it would be in the realm of the possible to say the Emmiyan might have come close to the 9m barrier with a 1.9mps wind and altitude. Well...maybe 2.0+ mps winds.

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                    • #40
                      Didnt Carl have a jump In Barcelona that measured 30 feet from toe to mark?

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by parkerrclay
                        Didnt Carl have a jump In Barcelona that measured 30 feet from toe to mark?
                        Since he only jumped 8.68, he would have had to take off half a meter from the board. Doesn't sound likely.
                        Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Powell
                          Originally posted by parkerrclay
                          Didnt Carl have a jump In Barcelona that measured 30 feet from toe to mark?
                          Since he only jumped 8.68, he would have had to take off half a meter from the board. Doesn't sound likely.
                          Looking at pela2's page, I'm struck on how poorly this decade, in its 8th year, is doing on the all-time list

                          http://www.alltime-athletics.com/mlongok.htm

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                          • #43
                            I'm pretty sure I read this in a T&F News issue - either in late '92 or '93. If someone has access to them, perhaps they could check and post.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Powell
                              Originally posted by parkerrclay
                              Didnt Carl have a jump In Barcelona that measured 30 feet from toe to mark?
                              Since he only jumped 8.68, he would have had to take off half a meter from the board. Doesn't sound likely.
                              I worked many of Lewis' competitions fron Houston in the 80s to Atlanta 96.. He rarely fouled or left more than a couple of centimeters on the board, certainly not 46 cm, which would be 26 cm before the board.

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                              • #45
                                Re: Carl Lewis 30ft Long Jump

                                Originally posted by phil shinnick
                                I know Carl and I heard about his jump of 30'. When I was in high school I jumped near 25' at the State meet and did not foul and put my spikes in the spike marks, the official put cardboard on my toe and said the angle was just over 90 degrees but he wasn't sure, so ruled it a foul. I don't think there was such a rule.
                                When I jumped at the Conference championships in 1963 I jumped over 26' and did not foul (one inch back) and put my foot in my spike marks but the officials ruled I didn't have my balance even though I exited the pit at a proper angle,
                                Phil, I have been competing and officiating long jump for more than 60 years and remember when you were a major jumper. Nothing infuruates me more than a clueless, self-important official lording it over High school kids.

                                I thought I had encountered every level of officiating incompetence but the curious method you describe of determining a foul by placing a card on the shoe tip, presumably to determine if it was over the line when your spikes were placed in your take off spike marks, is a new one for me.

                                I am assuming plasticine was not in use. Competent officials call visual fouls instantly, not by committee or after a seance or introspection and magic tricks. Apparently, this offical is from the When In Doubt Call a Foul school instead of the Ties Go the Athlete school ascribed to by all current officials of my wide acquaintance. Or, maybe it is as simple as he had a nephew in the competition.

                                You second screwing on the "improper balance" exit foul is another popular non-existent rule in the "get out of the pit before the bar falls off" genre. I still run into old timers who try to cite an "out of control" exit. Apparently this is carried over and implied from the throws which require the thrower to stay in the ring until the implement lands and exit the rear half of the ring. Apples and oranges. The only exit requirement is that, in the course of landing, you not touch the ground outside the pit between your mark and the take off board and do not walk back through the pit before exiting.
                                I know, too late now but you can still challenge incompetence when you encounter it.

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