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Mary Wineberg's Olympic Gold

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  • #16
    Even more esoteric question: how many state championships did DeHart Hubbard win?
    Answer: Zero. Cincinatti's school board didn't allow teams to travel to the state meet back then.

    Me and a physics teacher friend worked on a DeHart Hubbard problem a while back. He jumped a "WR" of 7.98 or thereabouts in the mid-20s but it was not approved because the board was 1 inch higher than the pit. Using a takeoff angle of 19 to 21 degrees (which Boo Shexnayder told me was the norm), we figured he would have touched down at 7.90 under regulation conditions, which would have been a WR.

    Yeah, math and phyisics people have wild times when we get together.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Mighty Favog
      . He jumped a "WR" of 7.98 or thereabouts in the mid-20s but it was not approved because the board was 1 inch higher than the pit. .
      I am familiar with Mr Hubbard 'srecord and my comments are to applaud, not denigrate, his accomplishments because I am familiar with primitive jumping facilities.

      I wonder if the board was one inch higher than the runway or the rim of the pit or the sand level. I have seen tens of thousands jumps and,unless it is the first jump after screeding, a rarity in olden days, few sand surfaces, even today, are absolutely level with the board.
      I also wonder if it was a pit without fixed edges. Dunno how it was in the 20s but in my experience in the 40s and even into the 50s, most outdoor long jump pits, even at D1 venues, were just excavations originally (nearly) filled with sand which quickly scattered until we were frequently jumping into pits substantially lower than the takeoff board. Typically the "rim" of the pit was several inchs of sand build up overgrown with grass.
      Also, we did not really have runways. The boards were just set into the ground and we approached over a path worn in the grass.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Mighty Favog
        He jumped a "WR" of 7.98 or thereabouts in the mid-20s but it was not approved because the board was 1 inch higher than the pit. Using a takeoff angle of 19 to 21 degrees (which Boo Shexnayder told me was the norm), we figured he would have touched down at 7.90 under regulation conditions, which would have been a WR.
        That 7.90 is essentially the same as his 25-10 7/8 WR set in the 1925 NCAA.

        The 26-2 1/4 mark was at the Ohio AAU championships in Cincinnati on 9/17/27.

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