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spin technique in the javelin?

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  • spin technique in the javelin?

    Was reading through the IAAF's WR progression book and noticed that a spin technique in the JT was banned in 1956. Certainly a wise move. Does anyone remember seeing this? Was it a spin similar to the HT or SP?

  • #2
    Re: spin technique in the javelin?

    yeah, I remember something about... even remember a picture in an old issue of some person from a Hispanic country preparing to throw with the outlawed technique.

    From what I remember it involved a spin, one or more times, and the thrower would have wet, slippery/soapy hands, and as the thrower was coming into a position to release, the javelin would slide down from his imitial grip position to somewhere closer to the other end, and then bam, it's up and out of there. This was quickly disallowed for a variety of reasons, safety probably being first and foremost.

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    • #3
      Re: spin technique in the javelin?

      I think I saw a photo once and the implement was being held near the tail. But that may have been just pre-throw, and the sliding down the jav may have been what was happening.

      IAAF didn't outlaw spin as such, they just required that the thrower face the landing area until completion of the throw (which I took to mean landing, but I havn't read the rules in alotta years). If completion includes landing, the rule is not very strigently enforced. Still, with the "spin outlaw", plus flat throws, JT has more ways to foul than any other throw.

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      • #4
        the Spanish Barravasca ...

        A friend of mine from Utah sent this to me ...

        It is known in some circles at the Spanish Barravasca technique. It looks a little bit like the discus technique. The tail or the rear part of the javelin rests against your back and during a discus style delivery (throwing phase) the implement slides out of your hand, that has been greased slick (the grip is reverse to the standard one).

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        • #5
          Re: the Spanish Barravasca ...

          Thanks.
          I was picturing some guy spinning a javelin over his head cowboy-style.

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