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  • BillVol
    replied
    dj, the book I referenced also has Bussard's birthdate as August 12, 1928.

    It sounds like he made himself at home at Bridgewater since he was there for quite some time. The book doesn't indicate when he graduated from Bridgewater. Perhaps he never graduated? Maybe they gave him an honorary degree? Spizzerinctum says that Bussard had school interrupted many times by jobs and coaching. From the book:

    "Ray's father and others had said many times that he would never finish college, that there were too many distractions and never enough money." This quote was by Bussard's wife, Ruth.

    I learned something new about the National AAU All-Around from the book. Hopefully this is all accurate information.

    - "It was designed to be tougher than the decathlon, 10 events in one day instead of two." (Words of the book's author.)

    - Bussard finished 2nd in the All-Around his first time competing, to Johnny Voight of Oklahoma A&M. No date given, but it says that the competition included "America's best athletes who weren't somewhere else training for the 1952 Olympics."

    - "The National All-Around was once America's greatest track and field event. Roots run back to Civil War days." (Author.)

    - "After the decathlon was introduced at the 1912 Olympics, the All-Around faded into the background. It was discontinued for a while but made a comeback after World War II and survived until 1977." (Author.)

    - Avery Brundage and Jim Thorpe are former winners of the All-Around.

    - "The highlight of Bussard's athletic career came in the rain, back in Baltimore, in August 1952. He swept a field of 40 in his second try at the National AAU All-Around. Tex Carter, University of Maryland, was runner-up, 849 points behind Bussard. Tim Wilson of the New York Athletic Club was third. Voight, defending champ, withdrew after twisting a knee in the hammer throw. Bussard again scored in all 10 events. He won three. He was second in four, third in three." (Author.)

    "Dr. Z" has a book on the All-Around, much of which you can read at this preview: http://books.google.com/books?id=eXOBPt ... ry_r&cad=0

    Leave a comment:


  • dj
    replied
    Originally posted by BillVol
    From Marvin West's book on UT swimming "Spizzerinctum":

    In January 1946, after one semester at Ohio U., Bussard departed Athens and enrolled at Bridgewater. It was much closer to home and he wanted to train in track with Richards....

    (Bussard speaking.) "I was on the basketball team the day after I arrived on campus but by the time I was really settled in, Richards was gone to the University of Illinois because of a disagreement. He wanted to participate in the Penn Relays. He had a place to stay. All he needed was a bus ticket and enough money for food. His request was turned down and that's how Bridgewater lost one of the greatest athletes in the world."


    http://web.archive.org/web/200712161350 ... 2_0_16_0_C
    Very interesting. Here is my source for the August 1928 birthdate: http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/imageg ... tryID=B117

    The Richards transfer fits, as he competed for Bridgewater in the Penn Relays of 1944 and '45, and at some point thereafter heads to Illinois.

    The birthdate makes Bussard a 16-year old high school grad, turning 17 in the August following graduation.

    Leave a comment:


  • mrbowie
    replied
    That a lot of water under the bridge.

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  • tandfman
    replied
    But would Richards have become one of the greatest athletes in the world if he had stayed at Bridgewater?

    Leave a comment:


  • BillVol
    replied
    From Marvin West's book on UT swimming "Spizzerinctum":

    In January 1946, after one semester at Ohio U., Bussard departed Athens and enrolled at Bridgewater. It was much closer to home and he wanted to train in track with Richards....

    (Bussard speaking.) "I was on the basketball team the day after I arrived on campus but by the time I was really settled in, Richards was gone to the University of Illinois because of a disagreement. He wanted to participate in the Penn Relays. He had a place to stay. All he needed was a bus ticket and enough money for food. His request was turned down and that's how Bridgewater lost one of the greatest athletes in the world."


    http://web.archive.org/web/200712161350 ... 2_0_16_0_C

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  • dukehjsteve
    replied
    deleted

    Leave a comment:


  • dj
    replied
    Bob Richards vaulted for Bridgewater College in 1944 and 1945 and for Illinois in 1946 and '47.

    Bussard was born August 12, 1928, in Hot Springs, Virginia, so it seems very unlikely that he could have been a contemporary at Bridgewater in the spring of 1945.

    Leave a comment:


  • bambam1729
    replied
    Originally posted by BillVol
    Maybe a post reading "Jesse Owens was fast" would go unchallenged!
    Maybe not. Texas would probably have something to say.

    Leave a comment:


  • BillVol
    replied
    Just covering my ass, Paul.

    Leave a comment:


  • paulthefan
    replied
    Re: Ray Bussard?

    Originally posted by BillVol
    http://vault.sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1084630/index.htm

    I am certain this isn't true, but someone posted on a UT board that former Vol swim coach Ray Bussard, who was a PVer in college at the same time as Bob Richards, "qualified for the Olympic team." But "an injury prevented him from going." Surely this isn't true. Maybe he qualified for the Trials? I doubt even that.http://www.ishof.org/honorees/99/99bussard.html
    moral of the story: Always trust BillVol's instincts when it comes to things touching and tangential on Tennessee's Vols.

    Leave a comment:


  • dukehjsteve
    replied
    What has always disturbed me about newspaper articles, sports and otherwise, is that I all-so-frequently find errors in articles about the one subject I know so well... namely Track & Field. So I have to assume that articles on all other subjects are equally error-filled.

    Leave a comment:


  • BillVol
    replied
    http://www.bridgewater.edu/Athletics/Re ... e/BussardR

    No mention of any vaulting in his HOF bio from Bridgewater.

    Leave a comment:


  • BillVol
    replied
    I think the British article that gh linked on the front page about sports journalism applies here. You just can't always believe what you read. People see it in print and accept it as fact.

    What I appreciate about T&FN is that they rarely are in error, despite all the numbers and information they have to juggle.

    I don't think I've ever made a post here that wasn't corrected or tweaked, another reason I enjoy posting here, believe it or not. One of these days, I'm going to get one right. Maybe a post reading "Jesse Owens was fast" would go unchallenged!

    Leave a comment:


  • gh
    replied
    Richards was Illinois class of '47, Bussard Bridgewater of '54.... not likely their collegiate paths ever crossed.

    Remember this thread regards small-school vaulting from the '50s?

    http://mb.trackandfieldnews.com/discuss ... ridgewater

    Mason-Dixon Conference won at 12-6 in ’52.

    Leave a comment:


  • tandfman
    replied
    Originally posted by BillVol
    Perhaps it is saying that they were both in college at the same time, and Bob was the nation's #1 vaulter and Ray #2. If so, that is impressive
    Yes, indeed, but it's just not so. He was never the nation's #2 pole vaulter.

    Leave a comment:

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