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RIP: Glenn Davis

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  • RIP: Glenn Davis

    The winner of the 400-Meter Hurdles at both the 1956 and 1960 Olympic Games was 74.

    http://www.cleveland.com/livingston/ind ... _from.html

  • #2
    I am astounded that Cleveland could possibly have had 41 better sportspeople than a guy who won 2 golds and was #1 in the world 4 years out of 5 in what is clearly one of the most gruelling athletic events (and also ranked #1 globally in the 400m in 1958 and won OG relay gold).

    "In "The Great Book of Cleveland Sports Lists," which I co-authored with WKNR AM/850 radio personality Greg Brinda, we put Davis at No. 42 on the list of the top 100 athletes in history in the seven-county metropolitan area."
    As an aside, was Davis any chance to run the OG relay in 56?

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    • #3
      In my youth Glenn Davis was the greatest athlete I ever saw (maybe he still is)

      I was lucky enough to see him run i Oslo in mid July 1958 when he was at his absolute best.
      On the first day he went 21.1 and 49.8 (his WR was 49.5). On the second day, when I saw him, he ran 10.3 and 45.6 (WR was 45.2).

      Later that year he stumbled over the last hurdle in Budapest and still set a WR with 49.2.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by AS
        I
        "In "The Great Book of Cleveland Sports Lists," which I co-authored with WKNR AM/850 radio personality Greg Brinda, we put Davis at No. 42 on the list of the top 100 athletes in history in the seven-county metropolitan area."
        must have been because of his West Virginia origin, otherwise it makes no sense at all. He was as rare an athlete as there was. Our hearts go out to Davis' family.
        ... nothing really ever changes my friend, new lines for old, new lines for old.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by paulthefan
          Originally posted by AS
          I
          "In "The Great Book of Cleveland Sports Lists," which I co-authored with WKNR AM/850 radio personality Greg Brinda, we put Davis at No. 42 on the list of the top 100 athletes in history in the seven-county metropolitan area."
          must have been because of his West Virginia origin, otherwise it makes no sense at all. He was as rare an athlete as there was. Our hearts go out to Davis' family.
          I doubt it was the WV aspect as much as picking pro athletes from baseball and football. With the limited success of Cleveland basketball teams, one would hope that track athletes outnumber basketballers.

          Cleveland's East Tech HS produced Jesse Owens, Harrison Dillard and Dave Albritton. I could see Owens and Dillard ahead of Davis among Cleveland-area track athletes, but are there any others?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by dj
            I could see Owens and Dillard ahead of Davis among Cleveland-area track athletes, but are there any others?
            I see Owens ahead of Glenn Davis, but he and Dillard would be pretty close. Both the absolute best in their event to that time in history, both with two individual gold medals. Dillard has one extra relay gold over Davis. Davis is stronger on world records - 3 in the hurdles to 1 for Dillard, plus Davis has two WR at 440y. A very close call.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Per Andersen
              In my youth Glenn Davis was the greatest athlete I ever saw (maybe he still is)

              I was lucky enough to see him run i Oslo in mid July 1958 when he was at his absolute best.
              On the first day he went 21.1 and 49.8 (his WR was 49.5). On the second day, when I saw him, he ran 10.3 and 45.6 (WR was 45.2).

              Later that year he stumbled over the last hurdle in Budapest and still set a WR with 49.2.
              RIP - a truly great athlete. At the Pan Am Games in 1967, I spoke to some of the USA supporting staff at the 1956 Olys. I was interested in the story that Davis "talked" Southern out of the gold medal between the semis and the final, whilst they were getting massages. I did not get a straight answer - anyone "know" the details?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by dj

                Cleveland's East Tech HS produced Jesse Owens, Harrison Dillard and Dave Albritton. I could see Owens and Dillard ahead of Davis among Cleveland-area track athletes, but are there any others?
                Hard to beat those (Owens, Dillard, Davis)!
                Madeline Manning also from Cleveland.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by AS
                  I am astounded that Cleveland could possibly have had 41 better sportspeople than a guy who won 2 golds and was #1 in the world 4 years out of 5 in what is clearly one of the most gruelling athletic events (and also ranked #1 globally in the 400m in 1958 and won OG relay gold).

                  "In "The Great Book of Cleveland Sports Lists," which I co-authored with WKNR AM/850 radio personality Greg Brinda, we put Davis at No. 42 on the list of the top 100 athletes in history in the seven-county metropolitan area."
                  As an aside, was Davis any chance to run the OG relay in 56?
                  Re Davis's non-participation in the 1600 relay in Melbourne, I am going totally from memory here, as that is what makes this fun ! 400 winner Jenkins was on it, as was JW Mashburn, and wr holder Lou Jones, although he had flopped in the 400. Anchor was, of all people 800 winner Tom Courtney ! Courtney had proved he could RUN in the 400 when he won the AAU meet, a week before the Oly Trials, in 45.8... 3rd on the all-time 400 performers list ! He bumped an injured Jim Lea off the squad. ( Lea had flamed out in the heats of the 400 due to his injury) So with Courtney added, it's quite sure that Davis was never even considered. Plus, at the time, he was not even running on the flat.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    RIP: Glenn Davis

                    There must have been some celebrating going on in their room the night of Nov. 24, 1956, at the village in Melbourne. Roommates Glenn Davis (400 hurdles) and Bobby Morrow (100) each won a gold medal that day at the Olympic Games. It was the first of three, of course, for Morrow.

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                    • #11
                      As a long time volunteer assistant coach at Ohio State and coach of the Ohio Track Club (Davis' Club) from 1971 to 1991, I surprisingly only meet Davis once, in '70 or '71 I think. For some reason that I have never been able to determine, there were hard feelings between him and Ohio State. He may have felt felt that he didn't receive proper recognition from them, I'm not sure. Several times I called him while I was the coach of the club to solicit his help in fund raising activities, but he was never interested.

                      I thought the coverage of his passing in the Columbus Dispatch was appalling, just a couple of paragraphs that appeared to be the AP wire story with a brief comment from OSU Coach Robert Gary that didn't even mention him being a member of the Hall of Fame.

                      A high school teammate of mine, former Stanford quarter-miler Jim Ward, saw Davis last summer and sent me a picture. He did not look good in the picture. The cause of his death was not given, just a "long illness," but is is well known that he was a smoker during his competitive days and for years thereafter.

                      Very sad that such a great athlete would die at such a comparatively young age and that his passing did not rate more coverage, especially in Columbus.

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                      • #12
                        http://blog.dispatch.com/blog-18/2009/0 ... rves.shtml
                        There are no strings on me

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by guru
                          http://blog.dispatch.com/blog-18/2009/01/former_osu_star_davis_deserves.shtml

                          from the above article

                          If an Ohio State track star had won 26 Big Ten titles, set five world records, won three gold metals, been on the cover of SI and moved from track to pro football in the 1980s or 90s rather than the 1950s, everybody would remember his name now.

                          They don’t, unfortunately. It’s sad that so many people think that their heroes are the first heroes, that that the records and championships that came before their own lifetimes don’t matter. It’s sad, but it’s the case with a lot of us.


                          I just had to paste this in from the above article, Davis was an unparalleled talent.
                          ... nothing really ever changes my friend, new lines for old, new lines for old.

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                          • #14
                            Here's the NY Times obit:

                            http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/31/sport ... davis.html

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by tandfman
                              pretty skimpy obit,.. bare bones, next to nothing regarding the man himself.
                              ... nothing really ever changes my friend, new lines for old, new lines for old.

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