Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What would Steve Prefonaine have acomplished if he had lived

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #61
    Originally posted by Alan Sigmon
    Originally posted by gh
    The last time I ever talked to Pre was in San Diego in February of '75, just a couple of months before he died. Based on our conversation that night, I can fashion a not-too-far-fetched scenario whereby he would be out of running by '76, let alone '80.
    From Kenny Moore's Sports Illustrated article "A Final Drive to the Finish" (covering Prefontaine's last meet and death):

    Pre (describing an 8:36 two-mile in Modesto): "I was lethargic. I still am. I feel like quitting training. Maybe I want to devote my energies to something positive, something I can see bearing fruit."

    Not arguing with you or gh on Prefontaine's motivation or lack thereof, but the Modesto race was when he was still physically re-adjusting to sea-level after his first (and relatively lengthy) time of altitude training. It sometimes takes a month or so for certain biological factors (phosphate levels, etc) to re-adjust to sea-level the first time going up and down (especially if one had accidently trained too hard--say, trying to keep up with altitude dweller Shorter--and gotten into a hole). Until this happens, lethargy will be present.


    A tie-in: Reportedly, Prefontaine was trying altitude training at Shorter's insistence that doing so would be the only natural way to be able to compete with athletes using blood-boosting techniques (correctly or incorrectly, Prefontaine's #1 competitive target Viren was perceived as doing this still legal at the time technique). I believe the growing emergence of pharmaceutical performance aids in the distance events had more than a little to do with any slowly diminishing motivation for the former "Rube" from small-town Coos Bay.

    Comment


    • #62
      Originally posted by williamwindhamjr
      Alot of people talk about a span in the 70s when supposedly he reached his peak.The guy was only 24 for god sakes.If someone thinks that a distance runner reaches his peak 2 or 3 years removed from college,well let me call the circus because they are hiring clowns for a good laugh.In distance running you never know when improvement is coming,just ask GEBRAILESLE,who ran a world record in his 30s.
      Then why did Prefontaine only improve his 5,000 time by ONE second from the age of 21 to the age of 23? He ran 13:22.8 in 1972 and 13:21.8 in 1974.

      His best performance ever was a third place finish in July 1974 behind Dixon (8:14) and Puttemans (8:16). Pre ran 8:18, which lowered his PR from 1972 from 8:19.

      Pre matured very early, and the idea of someone at that level dropping his 5,000 PR by eight seconds to 13:13 (i.e., to the PR of the 1976 bronze medalist, Hildenbrand, who had quite a kick) would have raised a few eyebrows. Not many top-level runners with a long training history are capable of huge breakthroughs from the age 24 to the age of 26.

      Comment


      • #63
        Pre was only 24 and Geb is in his mid 30s and still running personal best.When youre a distance runner you are not gonna pr every year.Sometimes it takes years for a breakthrough which is why not everyone is cut out to be a distance runner.

        Comment


        • #64
          Originally posted by williamwindhamjr
          Pre was only 24 and Geb is in his mid 30s and still running personal best.When youre a distance runner you are not gonna pr every year.Sometimes it takes years for a breakthrough which is why not everyone is cut out to be a distance runner.
          Geb set his 5000m and 10,000m PRs when he was 25. The improvement he made from his previous 5000m WR set at age 22 was about 5 secs with an incremental jump in between.

          Pre might have gotten faster however it's unlikely that he would have run significantly faster.

          Comment


          • #65
            Based on what?

            Comment


            • #66
              Will asks: "Based on what?'

              Based on what Will just posted (that Pre was 24 when he died and that Geb kept improving past that age).
              And what Dutra posted (that Geb reached PRs at only 25).
              Will used Geb as an example, and Dutra indicated that Geb's example did not bear out Will's assertion that Pre would have continued to improve into his 30's.

              Comment


              • #67
                Experience and keen observation.
                Dutra and Living in the past appear to know what they are posting about and have the above.


                Originally posted by williamwindhamjr
                Based on what?

                Comment


                • #68
                  Well show proof that pre wouldnt have improved.You cant because he is dead,god rest his soul,but people have pre as washed up at 24,when some of the guys he ran against were probably blood doping.

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    What male US high schoolers (1500 -10,000 m) on the top ten list improved in the same event(s) after 24 years of age ?

                    25 yo Martin Liquori ('67) ran a 3:52.2 mile PB in 1975, but his career was delayed/prolonged by injuries. He was injured in 1971 and did return to racing until 1973.

                    There was no indication that Prefontaine was an exception and no reason for any knowledgable/rational person to think otherwise.

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Originally posted by williamwindhamjr
                      Well show proof that pre wouldnt have improved.You cant because he is dead,god rest his soul,but people have pre as washed up at 24,when some of the guys he ran against were probably blood doping.
                      Let's review shall we?

                      You started a thread asking how well Pre would have done had he not been killed in May of 1975.

                      Several posters have offered up well thought out responses to claims that he would have improved in any great fashion in a way that gives a fair amount of credence that he may not have improved all that much.

                      You're reaction is to apparently take umbrage in that opinion....which is all it is....and is exactly what you asked for....and to top it off you put out a strawman argument since no one is claiming that Pre was "washed up" and accuse at least some runners of blood doping when the only suspicion of that was with one or two runners with similar ability to Pre, never proven and doesn't take into consideration that, if these others guys were blood boosting, what makes you think that Pre wasn't? Before you run down a tangent on that issue....I do not think he was.

                      If you're going to ask for an opinion....you may get an answer you don't like.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X