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1980 Olympic trials in Eugene

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  • #31
    Re: 1980 Olympic trials in Eugene

    Originally posted by Halfmiler2
    Or the 1984 OG Pentathlon which was one of the closest multi-event competitions in memory.
    Obviously some people could... since that one was actually heptathlon :lol:
    Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

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    • #32
      I was not in the 10K, but I did qualify for the high jump. Though I could not compete because of a bad achilles, I was happy to go and watch the meet since it was my home pit and facility. Does anyone have a list of all the qualifiers for all the events in that meet?

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      • #33
        Originally posted by cclausa View Post
        Does anyone have a list of all the qualifiers for all the events in that meet?
        As previously noted by mcgato in Post 25, the information you seek is, indeed, available in the T&FN archive:

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        • #34
          Originally posted by gh View Post
          What made me puke (and I'm even lefty-leaning) was Carter's feeble defense of his decision on TV in '84.
          I was ok with the response. It cost the Soviets a lot of money and prestige. We weren't going to respond militarily. There were basically ( with variations) three choices: respond militarily, do nothing, or respond with a series of economic sanctions. Carter took option three.

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          • #35
            He could have still picked most of Option 3 other than blackballing the OG's. And I'm quite sure that right then and there, the Kremlin guys said "nyet on LA in 4 years... we'll get even." And they did.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Dave View Post
              I was ok with the response. It cost the Soviets a lot of money and prestige. We weren't going to respond militarily. There were basically ( with variations) three choices: respond militarily, do nothing, or respond with a series of economic sanctions. Carter took option three.
              Actually the "economic" sanction ended up being only boycotting Moscow. The US eventually sold the Soviets all the wheat they needed anyway. It was too hard on the US farmers to not do so.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by bambam1729 View Post
                Actually the "economic" sanction ended up being only boycotting Moscow. The US eventually sold the Soviets all the wheat they needed anyway. It was too hard on the US farmers to not do so.
                Carter imposed the sanctions and Reagan lifted them a year later.

                https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/1980_grain_embargo

                Per this article, Carter had two options: grain embargo and the boycott. He imposed.

                http://usforeignpolicy.about.com/od/...r-Olympics.htm
                Last edited by Dave; 07-30-2016, 03:28 AM.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Dave View Post
                  Per this article, Carter had two options: grain embargo and the boycott. He imposed.

                  http://usforeignpolicy.about.com/od/...r-Olympics.htm
                  As this article makes clear, Carter did NOT impose the boycott. He proposed it to the USOC and then exerted pressure on the USOC to go along. It was the USOC's decision, and they shamefully voted to yield to the political pressure. Many of the votes in favor of doing so came from representatives of winter sports who were unaffected by the boycott since the '80 Winter Games had already been held in Lake Placid.

                  It's interesting that the British government also supported boycotting the '80 Games, but the British Olympic Association told the government to go fly a kite, which is why Messrs. Coe, Ovett, Wells and others were able to go to Moscow and win gold medals there.

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                  • #39
                    Not exactly. They did more than just "exert pressure." There was a ton of pressure on the USOC from the government to support the boycott. They were threatened with rescinding the USOC's tax exempt status, which would have been crushing. US gov also said that if the USOC voted to go, they would void the US athletes' passports, preventing them from traveling.

                    Also the BOA left the decision somewhat in the hands of each NGB and a few did not go. Equestrian and sailing come to mind, although T&F did elect to compete.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by tandfman View Post
                      ... Many of the votes in favor of doing so came from representatives of winter sports who were unaffected by the boycott since the '80 Winter Games had already been held in Lake Placid. ....
                      all these years and I don't think I ever heard this aspect of the situation before!

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                      • #41
                        65 countries boycotted the games. It meant the Soviets took a real financial hit as well as a PR hit. We didn't have a lot of leverage at the time so options were very limited.

                        https://nsarchive.wordpress.com/2014...mpics-boycott/

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by gh View Post
                          all these years and I don't think I ever heard this aspect of the situation before!
                          I hadn't either...talking about self interests....

                          It still makes me ill thinking about it.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Dave View Post
                            65 countries boycotted the games. It meant the Soviets took a real financial hit as well as a PR hit. We didn't have a lot of leverage at the time so options were very limited.

                            https://nsarchive.wordpress.com/2014...mpics-boycott/
                            About 65 invited countries didn't send athletes to the 1980 Summer Olympics; but not all of them boycotted, and some boycotted separately from the US. Some Islamic countries would almost certainly have boycotted even if there was no US boycott; I think at least Saudi Arabia had indicated that they wouldn't be in Moscow before Jimmy Carter had said anything about a boycott.
                            Last edited by LopenUupunut; 07-30-2016, 11:38 PM.

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                            • #44
                              From a book I co-authored re 1980 boycott:

                              For the record, the following 63 nations did not compete in Moscow but were IOC members, and eligible to compete in the Olympics, as of 27 May 1980, the date due for acceptance of invitations to the 1980 Olympic Games: Albania, Antigua, Argentina, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, Bolivia, Canada, Cayman Islands, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Egypt, El Salvador, Federal Republic of Germany, Fiji, Gabon, The Gambia, Ghana, Haiti, Honduras, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Israel, Ivory Coast, Japan, Kenya, Korea, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Malawi, Malaysia, Mauritania, Mauritius, Monaco, Morocco, Netherlands Antilles, Niger, Norway, Pakistan, Panama, Papua-New Guinea, Paraguay, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Somalia, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, United States, U.S. Virgin Islands, Upper Volta, Uruguay, and Zaire.

                              As stated, the deadline for responding to the Moscow invitation to compete at the Olympic Games was 27 May 1980. The above nations can be separated into three categories based on this deadline – 1) declined the invitation, 2) did not respond to the invitation, and 3) accepted the invitation but eventually did not compete.

                              Twenty-eight nations declined the invitation to compete, as follows: Albania, Argentina, Bahrain, Bermuda, Canada, Cayman Islands, China, Federal Republic of Germany, The Gambia, Honduras, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Israel, Kenya, Liechtenstein, Malawi, Malaysia, Mauritania, Pakistan, Paraguay, The Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Thailand, Tunisia, Turkey, United States, and Uruguay.

                              Twenty-nine nations did not respond to the invitation to compete by 27 May 1980, as follows: Antigua, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Egypt, El Salvador, Fiji, Ghana, Haiti, Ivory Coast, Japan, Korea, Liberia, Monaco, Morocco, Netherlands Antilles, Norway, Papua-New Guinea, Somalia, Sudan, Swaziland, Togo, U.S. Virgin Islands, and Zaire.

                              Six nations accepted the invitation to compete, but eventually chose not to, as follows: Gabon, Mauritius, Niger, Panama, Suriname, and Upper Volta. The reasons for these nations’ eventually choosing not to participate are not clear.

                              There were two further categories of “IOC-member” nations in 1980. Both Chinese Taipei and Iran had been member nations of the IOC but at the time of the Moscow invitation they were in suspension and were not eligible to compete at the 1980 Olympic Games.

                              Finally, three nations were accepted into IOC membership at the IOC Executive Board Meeting in Lausanne on 9-10 June 1980, after the due date for acceptances to the Moscow invitation. These were Mozambique, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates. These nations were, therefore, not technically eligible to compete at Moscow. However, Mozambique did compete, although Qatar and the United Arab Emirates did not. It is likely that, because of the boycott, late invitations were extended to these three nations to fill out the list of competing nations in Moscow, and Mozambique was able to field a team in time, and chose to do so.

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                              • #45
                                LOL! If I had a dime for every guy who told me he was a member of an Olympic Team or even more common, one who has run under 4 for the mile, I'd be a rich man.

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