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Steve Scott Training, 1981-82

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  • #16
    Re: Steve Scott Training, 1981-82

    Malmo, again, let me thank you for pointing out an incorrect post. It was a mistake on my part, and I'm glad you did read the log and make the correction. I'm a big fan of Steve Scott -- in fact, I ran in a small group with him when I set my PR at 10K in a San Diego race years ago -- so I've always had great fondness for the man and his achievements. It would have been a disservice to him to not portray his training accurately.
    With regard to your other observations, we'll just have to disagree.

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    • #17
      Re: Steve Scott Training, 1981-82

      The
      >volume/mitochondiral relation I'll find.

      Trackhead, to clarify, it's indisputable that, as Malmo puts it, mileage and mitochondrial density are proportional. That's accepted. The question would be whether, in Scott's case, a guy who keeps to a fairly consistent training regimen of long runs, intervals, racing, mostly at a pretty high volume of miles, is going to lose mitochondria, or even signficant aerobic capacity, in the space of a month, when much of that volume and intensity is maintained.

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      • #18
        Re: Steve Scott Training, 1981-82

        In the 7 weeks of lowered training volume and added racing between 31 May and 25 July, Steve averaged 62 mi/wk, or 30% less than his normal training volume (90mi/wk). If he was going to go for another month of racing, he needed a recharge -- so he went back up to 95-100% of training volume to recharge his aerobic system -- and then can go back and race. To my way of thinking I cannot imagine that Steve would have been able to keep training at 30% less volume and still perform as he did.

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