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What is the shortest-lived WR in the history?

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  • What is the shortest-lived WR in the history?

    I think this might have been discussed before but I've forgotten the conclusion. So, by whom and in which event did a WR last for the shortest time? I was thinking about the duel between Carl Lewis and Mike Powell, but the 8.91m by the former was wind-aided so this wouldn't count.

  • #2
    There have been numerous instances of multiple records set in one competition. The first ones that come to mind are Vigneron 5.91/ Bubka 5.94 in 1984, Alessandro Andrei's series in 1987 and FBK breaking the HJ record 3 times in one competition in 1942(?).

    You can say the shortest-lived WR ever was set by Olga Rukavishnikova in the pentathlon in Moscow 1980. She finished the 800 in 2:04.8 to break the record, but her score was beaten by Nadezhda Tkachenko, who crossed the line in 2:05.2. She was thus technically the WR holder for 0.4 seconds (but only Tkachenko's record was officially recognized).

    If you exclude multiple records set during one competition, I can think of one case where a record was set twice in one event in a single day - in two different countries.
    Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Powell
      If you exclude multiple records set during one competition, I can think of one case where a record was set twice in one event in a single day - in two different countries.
      This sounds more realistic as i assume the WR is the one that stands at the end of the competition?

      Which is the one you had in mind?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Daisy
        Which is the one you had in mind?
        Women's JT, 11 June 1972. Ewa Gryziecka threw 62.70 in Bucharest at 5:46 PM and Ruth Fuchs beat that with 65.06 in Potsdam 34 minutes later!
        Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

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        • #5
          Powell, that's a great stat.
          You there, on the motorbike! Sell me one of your melons!

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          • #6
            For some strange reason the IAAF never ratified them, but true stat geeks know the WR was actually broken 3 times in 1.6 seconds in the women's pentathlon at the '80 Olympics in Moscow referenced by Powell above:

            Olga Kuragina finished the 800 to set new WR: 1.2 seconds later Olga Rukavishnikova crossed the line but had a higher overall score: 0.4 seconds later (actually was timed in 100ths, but the real numbers were never released) Nadezhda Tkachenko finished with an even higher score. By letter of the rules, all three should be in the WR Progressin, IMHO.

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            • #7
              In the fog banks of my memory it seems like I recall the men's TJ record falling a couple of times during the Mexico City OG... is that right?

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              • #8
                Vielleicht you beat me to it. That was my next topic. How this WR: superheavy weights Atlanta Ronnie Weller of West Germany sets the world record in the Clean and Jerk at 562 lbs on his last lift, celebrates by throwing his shoes into the crowd. The last lifter Andrey Chermerkin comes up minutes later and breaks that record with 573lbs on his last attempt. Note: he kept his shoes.

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                • #9
                  Mexico city TJ WR by Schmidt was broken in the prelims by Gentile of Italy. However the next day the tear began first by Gentile again, then Victor Vaneyev, then Prudencio followed by the reign of Saneyev. This might be the WR for setting WRs-Powell?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by tracknut
                    This might be the WR for setting WRs-Powell?
                    Probably. I know of a few cases of 3 WRs in one competition, but I couldn't find any other with 4.
                    Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

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                    • #11
                      And like most Mexico City stuff, totally bogus because of the altitude (not to mention the wind readings: 0.0 on Gentile, 2.0 on Saneyev, 2.0 on Prudencio, 2.0 again on Saneyev!).

                      This is one event, though, where the WR may well have fallen at sea level and with no wind question, simply because it would have been the first OG triple ever staged on synthetic, and that recast the whole event by itself.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by gh
                        And like most Mexico City stuff, totally bogus because of the altitude (not to mention the wind readings: 0.0 on Gentile, 2.0 on Saneyev, 2.0 on Prudencio, 2.0 again on Saneyev!).

                        This is one event, though, where the WR may well have fallen at sea level and with no wind question, simply because it would have been the first OG triple ever staged on synthetic, and that recast the whole event by itself.
                        Saneyev was then on the way up to becoming a true all-time great. Some would argue he should have been ranked #1 in 1967 also. He and Jonathon Edwards (with somewhat different records in Championships) must make up #1 and #2 all time in the TJ.

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                        • #13
                          Not WR but about 15 years ago when the NCAA Indoor was held in Oklahoma City, two women TJers from So Cal took turns breaking the NCAA TJ record. I lost track of how many times we had to stop the competition and find the Referee to verify and certify a new record. Many of the record jumps were consecutive so the record only lasted as long as the certification took plus one minute. I don't remember the distance or who won.

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                          • #14
                            Or how would you like to be the world indoor record setter (TJ) leave the stadium thinking you had it wrapped up-only to read that next morning that some guy named Michael Conley beat your mark on his last jump!!!

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                            • #15
                              Hey, don't leave til it is over. :P

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