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One-legged HJer clearing 1.92m without aid from prosthesis

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  • Vielleicht
    replied
    Originally posted by noone
    Originally posted by dukehjsteve
    Originally posted by jhc68
    No prostheis. Very Avant-like off a hop approach.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6auGPszgiJA
    Yes, that's 1.86.... what's this deal about him doing 2.08 ??!!
    Click on this link:

    http://www.sportshall.ca/accessible/hm_profile.php?i=45
    There isn't a video showing his jump of 2.04m or 2.08m, so I'm still quite skeptic. Did he finally take up a prosthesis and alter his approach?

    Leave a comment:


  • dukehjsteve
    replied
    Wow. I am more than impressed. It is absolutely amazing. Wow... again. :!:

    Leave a comment:


  • cullman
    replied
    Originally posted by dukehjsteve
    Originally posted by Marlow
    Originally posted by noone
    clearing 2.08m at the Tribune Games in Winnipeg. In 1981, he also raised his long jump record to 3.01m.
    My BS-meter is squawking. Was he wearing a prosthetic for a 'normal' approach? THAT I could believe.
    That was my same point earlier. NFW anyone could hop to the bar and jump 2.08. And that is surely no knock on him doing it with an artificial leg of any sort. But to repeat.... hop to the bar and then jump 2.08 ? No way.
    You're thinking like an able bodied person. Arnie had a disadvantage with approach speed but had less lower body mass to get over the bar.

    cman

    Leave a comment:


  • noone
    replied
    Yet it happened. I assume you opened the link that I posted to the Canadian Track & Field Hall of Fame. They even give the meet at which it was done. Surely you don't think they are liars?

    I remember when it happended, it was a minor sensation in Canada. There was lots of talk then of Boldt improving further and maybe even making the able-bodied Canadian team for 1984. Some (dumb) commentators even said he had an advantage (!)

    And yes, he hopped on one leg, like in the video.

    Leave a comment:


  • dukehjsteve
    replied
    Originally posted by Marlow
    Originally posted by noone
    clearing 2.08m at the Tribune Games in Winnipeg. In 1981, he also raised his long jump record to 3.01m.
    My BS-meter is squawking. Was he wearing a prosthetic for a 'normal' approach? THAT I could believe.
    That was my same point earlier. NFW anyone could hop to the bar and jump 2.08. And that is surely no knock on him doing it with an artificial leg of any sort. But to repeat.... hop to the bar and then jump 2.08 ? No way.

    Leave a comment:


  • noone
    replied
    Re: It's not that amazing

    Originally posted by Powell
    Originally posted by noone
    Take an athletic young man who happens to have lost a leg in an accident. If that man decides that instead of using crutches or a wheelchair, he wants to walk by hopping on his good leg, that leg will become very strong. Then he teaches himself some technique, and the result is a 6-foot plus high jumper. There are more of these than you think.
    How many more? At least in the developed world, I can't imagine many people doing that.
    Here is another one:

    http://profile.myspace.com/index.cfm?fu ... id=2225760

    Leave a comment:


  • Marlow
    replied
    Originally posted by noone
    clearing 2.08m at the Tribune Games in Winnipeg. In 1981, he also raised his long jump record to 3.01m.
    My BS-meter is squawking. Was he wearing a prosthetic for a 'normal' approach? THAT I could believe.

    Leave a comment:


  • noone
    replied
    Originally posted by dukehjsteve
    Originally posted by jhc68
    No prostheis. Very Avant-like off a hop approach.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6auGPszgiJA
    Yes, that's 1.86.... what's this deal about him doing 2.08 ??!!
    Click on this link:

    http://www.sportshall.ca/accessible/hm_profile.php?i=45

    Leave a comment:


  • dukehjsteve
    replied
    Originally posted by jhc68
    No prostheis. Very Avant-like off a hop approach.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6auGPszgiJA
    Yes, that's 1.86.... what's this deal about him doing 2.08 ??!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Mighty Favog
    replied
    I seem to remember seeing something about a foreign documentary on a one-legged high jumper. Dutch, I think, and released at least 15 years ago.

    EDIT: Foolish me. I confused "Crossbar" and "Höjdhoppar'n". Both fictional too, although the former is supposedly based on the true story of someone named Aaron Kornylo who lost a leg and kept on jumping.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhc68
    replied
    No prostheis. Very Avant-like off a hop approach.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6auGPszgiJA

    Leave a comment:


  • dukehjsteve
    replied
    Originally posted by jeremyp
    Originally posted by noone
    Arnie Boldt (Canada), a one-legged high-jumper set the outdoor WR with 2.04 and the indoor WR with 2.08 in 1981
    Any video of this latter jump, a truly unbelievable achievement.


    I'm curious about this too. I would tend to think he had a prosthesis on the "bad" or missing side ? I cannot imagine anyone hopping to the bar and then jumping 2.04/ 6'8 1/4", much less 2.08/6'9 3/4" .

    Leave a comment:


  • jeremyp
    replied
    Originally posted by noone
    Arnie Boldt (Canada), a one-legged high-jumper set the outdoor WR with 2.04 and the indoor WR with 2.08 in 1981
    Any video of this latter jump, a truly unbelievable achievement. Is there a woman's WR?

    Leave a comment:


  • Marlow
    replied
    Re: It's not that amazing

    Originally posted by Powell
    Originally posted by noone
    Take an athletic young man who happens to have lost a leg in an accident. If that man decides that instead of using crutches or a wheelchair, he wants to walk by hopping on his good leg, that leg will become very strong. Then he teaches himself some technique, and the result is a 6-foot plus high jumper. There are more of these than you think.
    How many more? At least in the developed world, I can't imagine many people doing that.
    Yeah, I can't buy that. Most athletic men can't high jump 6-feet, so a 1-legged six-footer is a far outlier.

    Leave a comment:


  • Powell
    replied
    Re: It's not that amazing

    Originally posted by noone
    Take an athletic young man who happens to have lost a leg in an accident. If that man decides that instead of using crutches or a wheelchair, he wants to walk by hopping on his good leg, that leg will become very strong. Then he teaches himself some technique, and the result is a 6-foot plus high jumper. There are more of these than you think.
    How many more? At least in the developed world, I can't imagine many people doing that.

    Leave a comment:

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