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  • Avante
    replied
    Re: In 1952.....

    Originally posted by gh
    Originally posted by Avante
    ......
    I have no doubts that Golliday could have beaten both Remigino and McKenley in 52. ...
    Hindsight is always 100%. I also have no doubts that if you ran the race 1000 times McKenley would beat Remigino in 999 of them.

    That's why we run races and go on results not forecasting.
    Would Bob Hayes beat fellow 1964 sprinter Gerry Ashworth? I 'm pretty sure we'd all...sure! Golliday was the superior 100m man to both Remigino and McKenley. I......see him beating both based on what they had accomplished prior to 1952.

    Not knocking Herb McKenley he's still the only sprinter in history to make Olympic finals in the 100, 200 and 400. In 47 he had the best times in the world in all three sprints, something else that's never been done. Tommie Smith coming close in 66, tying with others at 9.3 while having the best 200/400 times.

    Remigino wasn't on a par with Golliday.

    1951 USA

    100 m
    1 James Golliday USA 10.3
    1 Dean Smith USA 10.3
    3 Donald Campbell USA 10.5
    3 James Ford USA 10.5
    3 Bob Work USA 10.5
    3 George Brown USA 10.5
    7 Arthur Bragg USA 10.6
    7 Eddie Conwell USA 10.6
    7 Andrew Stanfield USA 10.6
    7 Jesse Thomas USA 10.6

    McKenley did run a 10.3 but it was back in 49. In 52 he was 30 years old, Golliday was only 21.

    Golliday was world ranked...

    51..1
    52..2
    53..7
    54..3
    55-1

    Remigino and McKenley were 1/3 in 52 with no other 100m rankings. Golliday was also a WR 9.3 man. With the info available to us, I gotta favor Golliday.

    I'll also forecast Usian Bolt being the top sprinter in 2010 8-)

    Leave a comment:


  • gh
    replied
    Re: In 1952.....

    Originally posted by Avante
    ......
    I have no doubts that Golliday could have beaten both Remigino and McKenley in 52. ...
    Hindsight is always 100%. I also have no doubts that if you ran the race 1000 times McKenley would beat Remigino in 999 of them.

    That's why we run races and go on results not forecasting.

    Leave a comment:


  • Avante
    replied
    Originally posted by dj
    I grant Dillard winnnig over Bill/William (Willie ?!?) Porter.

    But neither Peacock nor Golliday would have recovered in time to compete in the OG final. Peacock showed three weeks ahead of the OG final that he was incapable of sprinting or jumping well and three more weeks wouldn't have been enough time to put him with the best in the world.

    Golliday first pulled at the AAU champs in '52, which was only four weeks before the OG final. Again, not enough time to recover sufficiently.
    I see...thanks

    The bottom line is that to use "a" meet to determine the best we have to offer....nope! We need to go with the body of work over a period of time. What has the athlete shown us week in week out, year after year. Anything can and will happen in a one shot deal. To rely on a one shot deal..why?

    Leave a comment:


  • dj
    replied
    I grant Dillard winnnig over Bill/William (Willie ?!?) Porter.

    But neither Peacock nor Golliday would have recovered in time to compete in the OG final. Peacock showed three weeks ahead of the OG final that he was incapable of sprinting or jumping well and three more weeks wouldn't have been enough time to put him with the best in the world.

    Golliday first pulled at the AAU champs in '52, which was only four weeks before the OG final. Again, not enough time to recover sufficiently.

    Leave a comment:


  • Avante
    started a topic In 1952.....

    In 1952.....

    ....Jim Golliday was ranked number two in the world in the 100m. Yes ahead of Olympic silver medalist Herb McKenley. As we know (if you are familiar with Golliday) he never ran on an Olympic team. Injuries at the wrong time being the reason. Now I'm not sure if that meant no trials and he could have ran later on or...??? I really don't know and too lazy to do the work.

    Harrison Dilliard hitting a hurdle at the trials in 48, he was the WR holder, Eulace Peacock missing the 36 Olympics due to injury.

    I have no doubts that Golliday could have beaten both Remigino and McKenley in 52. I see Dillard beating Willie Porter in 48. I see Peacock giving Owens/Metcalfe all they wanted in the 100, probably taking second (he was a 26 plus jumper) in the long jump and gold in the 4x1.

    It's those kinds of things that have me against the current "one meet means everything" system we use today in coming up with out National teams. You keep a WR holder off a National team? No you don't!

    I put this here because of the ...well back in day...
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