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  • A unique stadium

    Can anyone help?

    I've seen some old footage from the early thirties, where the runners starts from under an open shed:

    where was that stadium and was it kind of unique in its form?

    Can it be Stanford/Palo Alto?

  • #2
    Re: A unique stadium

    Can you point to where the footage can be seen.

    The Stanford Stadium track had a shed near the 220y straight starting line, so it's possible this is what you've seen.

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    • #3
      Re: A unique stadium

      I've got the footage by trading to it.
      It had to come from some newsreels, but I can identify William Carr and Ben Eastman on the footage, so perhaps it is from Berkeley or Palo Alto, where these two had their great duels in 1932.
      The quality of the pictures ain't good, but I would like to know if the footage comes from OT in 1932 which were held in Stanford/Palo Alto.co

      N.B. Now, I've studied the footage closely and can tell, that it was some special kind of stadium, not only because of the open shed but also because of some grand seatings in the background to the right of the pictures of the sprint runners coming running against us in the straight.

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      • #4
        Re: A unique stadium

        It was Stanford Stadium!
        Thanks a lot for Your help, dj

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        • #5
          Re: A unique stadium

          I don't know when the present Stanford football stadium was built but I seem to recall that when Stanford track was inside the stadium, the 220 straight kinda extended into a "tunnel" which is now actually under the stands. Maybe it was a shed in 1932.

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          • #6
            Re: A unique stadium

            Originally posted by lonewolf
            I don't know when the present Stanford football stadium was built but I seem to recall that when Stanford track was inside the stadium, the 220 straight kinda extended into a "tunnel" which is now actually under the stands. Maybe it was a shed in 1932.

            Extended at which end?

            The starting end was never under stands. it's conceivable that if the 220 extended beyond the end of the oval straight that it went under the stands, but I highly doubt it based on the way the stadium was built. It was a standard bowl, with earth hollowed out to create a sunken field and track, and the earth piled around the hole on which was mounted the grandstand. Earlier examples of this were Yale Bowl and Princeton's Palmer Stadium.

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            • #7
              Re: A unique stadium

              There are several Stanford exes on this forum who probably know the answer while I am fumbling around in a faltering memory bank.
              I believe Stanford stadium runs North-South, the "tunnel" I remember would be at the SE corner. I assume wind direction would determine which end was start.
              The field is a bowl below surrounding ground level and you walk down a ramp under the stands to reach field level. (Unless I am thinking of someplace else.)

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              • #8
                Re: A unique stadium

                Originally posted by lonewolf
                There are several Stanford exes on this forum who probably know this while I am fumbling around in a faltering memory bank.
                I believe Stanford stadium runs North-South, the "tunnel" I remember would be at the SE corner. I assume wind direction would determine which end was start.
                Yes, SE corner was the start of the 220 straight. But there was never a tunnel, just the one opening in the bowl. On the other hand, if one was sitting on the backstretch, the sprinters in the 220 and 440/880 starts would have popped into view on the oval after having started out of view.

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                • #9
                  Re: A unique stadium


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                  • #10
                    Re: A unique stadium

                    Thanks, Daisy. That pic was before the field was lowered and there was no ramp. There would not have been room for a 220 straight after it was lowered but there was the remnant of a track before seating was built over it.

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                    • #11
                      Re: A unique stadium

                      some footage from a great meeting, that took place at Stanford U./Palo Alto, CA
                      the 21th and 22th of July, 1962:

                      USA vs USSR 1962, Bob Hayes-Jerry Tarr-Jim Beatty m-fl.
                      http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=69209

                      USA-USSR 1962 – Bob Hayes, Ralph Boston og Valerij Brumel m.v.
                      http://www.thoughtequity.com/video/clip ... 021_128.do

                      N.B. Daisy, also thanks from paw: Now I can see the cottage the runners went past after the start in the old footage from the thirties!

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                      • #12
                        Re: A unique stadium

                        :? well, now I had to admit that I've overlooked the following in Hymans 'The History of the U.S.Olympic Trials' about the 200 meter final:
                        quote: it was in fact a 200m straight, evidenced by videotape showing the runners coming out of the tunnel at the end of the long straight in Stanford stadium 60 meters into the race. - unquote!

                        Footage from another great meeting at Stanford stadium in 1960 the US OT:
                        N.B. Don Bragg cleared a new record in this meeting, but the pole vaulter in the footage look more like Ron Morris to me!

                        http://www.thoughtequity.com/video/clip/331775_020.do

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                        • #13
                          Re: A unique stadium

                          Interesting. They threw the hammer out of an open top "cage" with approx 10 foot high walls.

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                          • #14
                            Re: A unique stadium

                            Originally posted by paw
                            Footage from another great meeting at Stanford stadium in 1960 the US OT:
                            N.B. Don Bragg cleared a new record in this meeting, but the pole vaulter in the footage look more like Ron Morris to me!

                            http://www.thoughtequity.com/video/clip/331775_020.do
                            Don't know about Morris, but it's definitely not Bragg!

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                            • #15
                              Re: A unique stadium

                              Originally posted by lonewolf
                              Thanks, Daisy. That pic was before the field was lowered and there was no ramp. There would not have been room for a 220 straight after it was lowered but there was the remnant of a track before seating was built over it.
                              I could be wrong, but don't believe the Stanford stadium was ever lowered. And where the 200 straight used to be never had any seats put over it; couple of auxiliary sheds were there in the '70s and '80s.

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