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  • 1922 photo

    http://www.shorpy.com/node/965

    Have a look at this old, posed photo... obviously not a real start to a real race but note the way the runner is set up with his feet behind the chalk line but hands in front of it.
    Is this just an anomoly, something staged by a clueless photographer, or was this an acceptable starting mode in 1922?

  • #2
    Re: 1922 photo

    Originally posted by jhc68
    Is this just an anomoly, something staged by a clueless photographer, or was this an acceptable starting mode in 1922?
    Even if the photographer was clueless, the runner would have known better, so I'm guessing it was acceptable in some places.

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    • #3
      Re: 1922 photo

      you can still see photos/videos of similar starting styles as recently as Peter Snell - in the 800 - not sure about the 1500 - but the hands were on starting line and feet moved back. And other 'distance' (middle) in the fifties. If memory serves somebody did it in the first sub 4 mile

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      • #4
        Re: 1922 photo

        This struck me as a generic yearbook-type image; I'm not sure we should read too much into the starting position it shows, but it is odd.

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        • #5
          Re: 1922 photo

          His toe is even on the line.
          As far back as I can remember (1930s) hands had to be behind the line. I think this is probably a staged photo by a clueless photographer and a careless (perhaps clueless) runner.
          Which is not to say that poorly officiated infractions do not continue to occur to this date.

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          • #6
            Re: 1922 photo

            Originally posted by kuha
            This struck me as a generic yearbook-type image...
            Perhaps not. I am curious if perhaps this sort of start was not totally unused back then. Who knows, maybe some officials thought the rules said the feet have to be behind the lines or whatever. Not including anyone here, (especially you lonewolf ) but a lot of track officials aren't always the brightest bulbs on the planet.

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            • #7
              Re: 1922 photo

              Originally posted by kuha
              This struck me as a generic yearbook-type image; I'm not sure we should read too much into the starting position it shows, but it is odd.
              Yes, but I'm guessing that if an athlete 'knows better', he doesn't want to look like a fool in the photo.

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              • #8
                Re: 1922 photo

                Originally posted by Marlow
                Originally posted by kuha
                This struck me as a generic yearbook-type image; I'm not sure we should read too much into the starting position it shows, but it is odd.
                Yes, but I'm guessing that if an athlete 'knows better', he doesn't want to look like a fool in the photo.
                I agree, I would think it would almost be against your nature to line up like that, sort of like a photographer pretending to take a picture with the lens cap still on. Unless perhaps that is how you normally did it. (See above.)

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                • #9
                  Re: 1922 photo

                  Originally posted by Marlow
                  Originally posted by jhc68
                  Is this just an anomoly, something staged by a clueless photographer, or was this an acceptable starting mode in 1922?
                  Even if the photographer was clueless, the runner would have known better, so I'm guessing it was acceptable in some places.
                  Marlow, I see you already are ahead of me on this point.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: 1922 photo

                    Originally posted by Marlow
                    Originally posted by kuha
                    This struck me as a generic yearbook-type image; I'm not sure we should read too much into the starting position it shows, but it is odd.
                    Yes, but I'm guessing that if an athlete 'knows better', he doesn't want to look like a fool in the photo.
                    You're probably right.

                    Marlow's on a Bolt-like roll. Two correct answers in May and the streak shows no signs of ending!!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: 1922 photo

                      No rules in 1922 allowed any part of the body to touch ground on the other side of the starting line. Until some point in the teens (perhaps early '20s) some rules charged a false start not for moving before the gun but for touching ground beyond the starting line before the gun.

                      Hence, the seemingly many false starts in the 1912 Olympic 100, as the Americans were trying to figure out the starter's cadence so they could be moving but without footfall when the gun sounded.

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                      • #12
                        Re: 1922 photo

                        I have seen start picture from Euro sprint and hurdles races from the Teens and early 20's. In some cases fingers were on the line but never over it like the guy in the picture.

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