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  • #16
    Re: Feature article on ,

    Yeah, I agree that for the majority of jumpers the learning curve for flopping is faster and the potential for higher marks is better than learning the straddle.
    But I am not sure that a super-athlete like Brumel would have jumped higher by flopping. I bet he could have made the transition easily but, given his level of talent, my hunch is his marks would be the same with either style.
    Also, I would bet that slow-footed, power-jumper straddlers like John Thomas or Ed Caruthers had more potential as straddlers than floppers.
    I agree it would be interesting to hear from people who were truly proficient straddlers that committed to switching techniques. Probably there were not very many people in that category.

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    • #17
      Re: Feature article on ,

      How do you think Brumel would have done if he had been born in the 60's or 70's like Soto? 8'0??

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      • #18
        Re: Feature article on ,

        Well if Brumel could have avoided the motorbikes, he probably would have done better. PS, I have a pr of 2.25 flopping, and 1.98 rolling.

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        • #19
          What happened to ?

          We're getting off topic (oh well)

          but I recall reading that Dwight Stones used to occasionally straddle his lower heights (because he was less consistent with the flop ?)

          and Yashchenko in the interview with TF&N states with much authority that he didn't like the flop and didn't think he would jump any higher with it

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          • #20
            Re: What happened to ?

            My humble opinion is that Brumel could have been a world class athlete in a couple of events, or, really a couple of sports. Same could be said of Sotomajor. Brumel surely would have jumped higher with modern jumping surfaces and more sophisticated training, but Soto is 6 inches taller and wins on pure size. If I recall correctly, Dwight liked to straddle for fun but thought he was way more efficient flopping. Yaschenko had so much size and strength and such a radical, aggressive straddle style it is hard to see how he could have improved with the flop. What a shame he had such brief career, he might have become the first 8 footer. He passed away young, as well.

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            • #21
              Re: Feature article on ,

              hijumpfan, if really jumped 2.25 F and 1.98 S, then you never really straddled seriously. Anybody that can flop 2.25 has to have immense jumping talent regardless of style used. 1.98 is light years apart from 2.25 ! I wonder who you are ?

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              • #22
                Re: Feature article on ,

                and jhc68, I we you agree with me that since the flop is technically easier, at least at imtermediate level heights, it "helped people like us more than the big boys.

                But then maybe not. I just cannot envision anyone straddling 8 feet. So maybe it helps eveyone ny my 4 inch apporoximation.

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                • #23
                  Re: Feature article on ,

                  Yeah, Yaschenko is the only one I could imagine approaching 8 ft straddling, he only had the one breakthrough year as a teenager and yet jumped 7'8"... if you can find old photos of him, he had some monster clearances at high hts. But, generally it seems like straddle mechanics make it impossible to leave the ground as quickly and explosively as skilled floppers can, so for most people flopping offers more potential. Actually, it is pretty hard to imagine jumping 8 ft using any style, isn't it?

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                  • #24
                    Re: Feature article on ,

                    with a tramboline ......

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                    • #25
                      Re: Feature article on ,

                      Well my pr is 2.24 (plus an unratified 2.25 which still irritates me) from over 20 years ago and I couldn't straddle to save my life...think the best I could do was about 1.65! Yashenko (who I competed against) was easily the best talent I've ever seen, including Soto. There was a video of him clearing 2.28 at Euro Champs 1978 by at least 6-9" and quite possibly more...I'm not exagerating (my dad, who was the UK national HJ coach, comes here occasionally and he'll confirm). Plus he did it after a night on the booze! I have no doubt that if he'd had a long career he'd have jumped 2.45+. His death from I presume the bottle was a great shame.

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                      • #26
                        Re: Feature article on ,

                        There used to be a photo posted on the Joe Faust High Jump World site showing Yashenko skying over a height by a minimum of 12-15 inches... the height was unknown but it was claimed that he opened at that meet at 6'8". I believe it was a USA-USSR Juniors Meet and I believe Yashenko, Skeets Neamiah and Michel Carter all competed. Or am I delusional about the whole thing?

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                        • #27
                          Re: Feature article on ,

                          > I believe it was a USA-USSR Juniors Meet and I believe Yashenko, Skeets Neamiah and Michel Carter all competed. Or am I delusional about the whole thing?<

                          At the very least, you're delusional about the spelling of Yashchenko, Nehemiah and Michael. :-)

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                          • #28
                            Re: Feature article on ,

                            oh, well, it was late at night for an old guy like me !

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                            • #29
                              Re: Feature article on ,

                              Not to get back to THE TOPIC AT HAND, but . . .
                              I have subscribed for 32 years now, and yes I did it first for the results, but even then I had Track Newsletter that gave them better (faster), so now I actually read the magazine and my favorite sections are:
                              1. Previews - the year in general, HS, college, US, World
                              2. Predictions, i.e. form charts
                              3. features on new stars
                              4. updates on current stars
                              5. commentary on meets (but ya gotta keep the results there too)
                              6. lists (even though they are 'obsolete')
                              7. the new poster thing is good - what happened to real posters like the 70's?
                              8. Status Quo
                              9. News (upcoming meets, etc. )

                              My point is that I think T&FN has done a very good job of evolving and serving their readership (me being the most important element therein)

                              The new electronic site is great as well. Perhaps Mssrs Hill et al need a survey of what the bottom three features are and what 3 new things should be added or expanded. An on-line poll would be very easy, yes? Do it, gh.

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                              • #30
                                Re: Feature article on ,

                                >I guess this is a question for Gary Hill, but I'd
                                >like to know if others are interested. TFN has
                                >done some great articles about the status of T &
                                >F athletes of the past--but what about a monthly
                                >article? There seems to be a lot of interest in
                                >this...yes many questions and lots of interest!!i would love to know how many of my favorites atheletes of the past... are doing,what they are up too,please let me know!!

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