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R.I.P. Jim Dunaway

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  • R.I.P. Jim Dunaway

    David Monti tweeted eatlier today that USATF Hall of Famer Jim Dunaway died yesterday at age 87.
    Former Eastern Editor of T&FN beginning in 1964, and elected to the HOF on 2010, he will be greatly missed

    Today's T&F journalists can learn a lot from him!

  • #2
    I think he wrote some T&F how to books that I would check out regularly as a kid at the local library.

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    • #3
      Jim really loved Track and Field and the sport was better because of people like him.

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      • #4
        another voice for tand f has passed, Jim was a great follower and writer of tand f.rip

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        • #5
          Sylvia Huntsman, a long-time close friend of Jim Dunaway's, who's the wife of former Ohio, Tennessee, Texas, and Olympic (1988) coach Stan Huntsman, has been the (valiant) lead individual on a lot of Jim's medical and personal matters, along with Jim's nephew Bill Gooch in Austin, and another nephew Tom Gooch in Fort Worth. People have asked me about memorial services, flowers, and so on. Sylvia and Bill Gooch will be conferring with the funeral home people tomorrow afternoon. After that, I may do another post here of what I find out as to arrangements and wishes. The last I heard, this was to be a cremation.

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          • #6
            Jim was a delight. A man with a roguish wry sense of humour, he had a great love of the sport, and an elephantine memory. The last time I saw him was at the 2008 Olympic Trials, and he regaled me with all the detail he could remember (a lot) of the 1982 Olympic festival long jump, where Lewis had his famous no jump at around the WR distance. I'll certainly miss him, and I think a lot of others will as well.

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            • #7
              Years ago I spent a lot of time with Jim at track & field meets working together on television productions. I’m sure others who were Jim’s closer friends and colleagues will give their thoughts about this man who covered 14 Olympic summer games and 50 straight NCAA Outdoor championships. As for me, I’m just happy that I spent some quality time with him last year in Sacramento. His health had deteriorated and it was clear to me that this was likely his last national championship.

              I have also been around a lot of track and field meet press boxes. Jim was not just a journalist who covered athletics; he was a true extreme fan of all things track & field. The only thing that came close to Jim’s passion for the sport was his passion for good journalism. Besides being a great writer, Jim knew when something important was happening behind the scenes and he made sure to cover it. He also knew the steep marketing challenges facing track & field as a sport and worked tirelessly to improve the flow of information to journalists, many of whom were covering the meet because they drew the shortest straw.

              This Q& A with Tom Surber of USATF at the time he was named to the Hall of Fame touches on many of Jim’s qualities.

              http://www.usatf.org/news/view.aspx?...11_22_14_49_13

              I was honored to call Jim a friend, and will miss him dearly.

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              • #8
                Yes, whatever year it was...and I had always thought it was an Olympic Festival at Colorado Springs and thus at altitude but it sounds like I may be totally wrong and it was 1982 weich would be non-altitude Indianapolis..., Jim was definitely of the contentions (stronger than just opinions) that: (1) Carl Lewis jumped at least 30 feet and it wasn't a foul for whatever were the Jim-argued technical reasons about the plastic strip, the shoe length, the impression the shoe made on the strip, etc; (2) the officials raked the sand too fast; and (3) they should have measured carefully first as if it were for record consideration, not raked the sand until after that happened, and then re-hashed the issue of whether it was a foul or not foul.

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                • #9
                  Lee Nichols, who posts on these message boards and who used to write for the Austin Chronicle weekly publication, contacted the sportswriters at the Austin American-Statesman and alerted them to the news that Jim had passed away. He asked me beforehand if that was something advisable to do, and I said, yes, and better him with his journalistic credentials do it than me. What eventuated is that one of the top sportswriters there is going to do something quick in a column, apparently tomorrow, and then something longer for the Texas Relays, either in the newspaper or in the Relays program. So Lee asked me who the sportswriter might best contact. I suggested, for starters: Sylvia and Stan Huntsman, Walt Murphy, Art Morgan (former New Mexico State coach), Tom Casacky, Bob Hersh, Jack Pfeiffer, Kim Spir, Dave Johnson, Ruth Laney, Hayes Jones, Shawn Price (Texas A&M), Glen McMicken, Garry Hill or whoever at T&FN, Larry Eder who published American Track & Field, maybe Jill Geer at USATF, Bev Kearney, Paul Carrozza (former Run-Tex owner in Austin), Dr. Delano Meriwether, Marty Liquori, John Smith, and Igor Ter-Ovenesyan. I probably should have added Don Steffens and may correct that oversight. Anyway, that should be a good starter kit, albeit for the Texas Relays piece given that the list is too voluminous for purposes of tomorrow's column. Any additional ideas any of you have, you can either post them here, and Lee can direct the sportswriter to these message boards, or you can send them to me at [email protected] or to Lee if you have his e-mail address.
                  Last edited by CKuykendall; 03-17-2015, 05:21 PM.

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                  • #10
                    There's a new obit, with a 2008 photo, from Bob Ramsak at the Piran Cafe website, in Slovenia. I'd have to review the posting rules as to whether I can put links here. But the Google would be: james dunaway piran cafe

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                    • #11
                      Good, good man. I'll miss him. He used to stop in Durham when driving (!) from Austin to New York and we would have dinner (often with Jim Spier) and talk track for hours. Didn't dream he was 87 yo - he looked much younger.

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                      • #12
                        Jim Dunaway, RIP

                        Was saddened to learn that Jim Dunaway had died recently. I first met him at the 1972 Olympics in Munich, a Games that was marred by the Black September attack on the Israeli team. I also recall Jim at the European Championships at Rome in 1974. During a lunch break, the British Team Chief, Sir Arthur Gold, stopped by the press tribune to chat with British journalists and an impromptu conference began. Gold was defending his selection (and non-selection) choices on the GB team when Jim suddenly asked, "You wanted Alan Pascoe off the British team roster didn't you?"
                        The gentlemanly tone of the meeting suddenly changed. Sir Arthur blanched visibly and went into a rage. He started spluttering; shouting that he had never wanted any such thing, and demanding to know who his accuser was. When Jim told him, he replied, "Well Mister Delaware, I resent the poison in your accusation!" He then stormed off, muttering to himself.
                        That was Jim Dunaway - never afraid to ask the question none of us Brits dared to ask Sir Arthur Gold who we knew disliked Pascoe because the athlete was often openly critical of the British Amateur Athletic Board, which ran the international side of the sport in Britain back then.
                        The following day, Alan Pascoe won the 400 metres hurdles title.

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                        • #13
                          The guy who wrote the T&FN account of Bob Hayes' gold medal run at Tokyo 1964. Winner of USATF's inaugural Visa Pick-N-Win fantasy contest (2008 indoor season). He hated track liars (people who inflate their marks) and loved exposing them. One of the few U.S. journalists who attended and wrote about the T&F events at Moscow 1980. Someone who wanted to help preserve the history of the sport. A great colleague, always willing to share info and stories with stat fans that were somewhat younger. I already miss him.

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                          • #14
                            Some years ago, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department in the late fall would release hatchery trout into the Guadalupe River between Austin and San Antonio. I have a friend who's an avid fly fisherman. He was down there catching some of the trout, and got to talking a stranger who claimed that he would have been on the 1980 U.S. Olympic track & field team except for the U.S. boycott. Well, of course, there WAS a 1980 U.S. Olympic track & field team chose by Olympic Trials that only sent team members to the White House and not to Moscow. The friend had acquired the name of the stranger, who most definitely not on the team. I reported this to Jim, to whom it was something typical. He probably had a mental storehouse of comparable frauds he'd encountered over the years.

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                            • #15
                              Anyone know name of funeral home or date/time of memorial service?

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