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" Salute " film about Smith/Carlos/Norman

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  • " Salute " film about Smith/Carlos/Norman

    I was zapping channels today and ran into this.... 2 hour film produced in Australia by Peter Norman's nephew. Somewhat long and belabored but very good. Entire film focused on the '68 200 Medal Ceremony. Interview after interview with all 3 of them in present day, plus frequent short sessions with Payton Jordan, Larry Questad, etc. etc. and yes, even Cordner Nelson. Many film clips from Mexico City and Echo Summit.
    Has anybody else seen this ?

  • #2
    Originally posted by dukehjsteve View Post
    I was zapping channels today and ran into this.... 2 hour film produced in Australia by Peter Norman's nephew. Somewhat long and belabored but very good. Entire film focused on the '68 200 Medal Ceremony. Interview after interview with all 3 of them in present day, plus frequent short sessions with Payton Jordan, Larry Questad, etc. etc. and yes, even Cordner Nelson. Many film clips from Mexico City and Echo Summit.
    Has anybody else seen this ?
    Yes, saw it about a year back. It made me respect the attitude and stand of Peter Norman. Ozzies are not amongst those who generally support "minorities".

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    • #3
      is it on Youtube?

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      • #4
        found the trailers on youtube

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        • #5
          While I didn't find "Salute" I did find and watch "1968 Olympics The Black Power Salute". I arrived at WSU in 1970 and so grew up in the turbulence of the race issues of that time.
          While the US has progressed a long way, recent events such as Baltimore, Ferguson etc etc sadly show that the USA still has a long way to go

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          • #6
            I had the good fortune to attend '68 Mexico, saw the award ceremony up close, and Norman's tribute.
            He ran 20.01 in final and beat Carlos for Silver.

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            • #7
              Norman ran 20.06

              I met Smith when he ran in London in August '68 (20.9 on the White City Track - generally known as the sprinter's graveyard). I approached him and asked if he could spare a few minutes for a chat, and when I said "about track and field" (and not politics) he visibly relaxed. He was (and from interviews I've seen in the last few years, remains) gracious, friendly, and clearly enjoyed his sport [great British track writer Neil Allen headed up an article on Smith with the apt phrase "the awesome moment of moving good"]

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              • #8
                Speaking of times, the film simplified things a bit by using only the "official" rounded to the tenth times of 19.8 and 20 flat for Smith and Norman. And didn't these times still include the slight detraction for reaction to the gun ?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by rhymans View Post
                  Norman ran 20.06

                  I met Smith when he ran in London in August '68 (20.9 on the White City Track - generally known as the sprinter's graveyard). I approached him and asked if he could spare a few minutes for a chat, and when I said "about track and field" (and not politics) he visibly relaxed. He was (and from interviews I've seen in the last few years, remains) gracious, friendly, and clearly enjoyed his sport [great British track writer Neil Allen headed up an article on Smith with the apt phrase "the awesome moment of moving good"]
                  Neil Allen was a great writer. I particularly enjoyed his articles in World Sports in the early 1960s, including those on Bob Hayes and Henry Carr. The magazine took a downturn, in my opinion in the late 1960s, and was a shadow of its former self in the early 70s. The magazine covered a wide range of sports. Some favorites from the fifties articles on people like Stanley Matthews, Victor Barna, Erland Kops, Mo Connolly, and of course cricketing greats.

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                  • #10
                    I highly recommend The John Carlos Story by Dave Zinn for additional background. See http://www.amazon.com/The-John-Carlo.../dp/B0085S534W

                    It's a very easy read, should be "required reading". There is a funny anecdote about the time Carlos' Dad found his pound stash of weed. The stuff wasn't exactly "flushed" by the Dad and uncle but it took Carlos a while to learn the truth.

                    There was another documentary film which I believe was called Fists of Fury but I can't find much about it on the web now. I recorded it in VHS years back. If you can find that one, it is very well worth your while to see.
                    Last edited by Bob Duncan; 05-07-2015, 03:53 AM.

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                    • #11
                      In the " Salute" film, Carlos and Smith act all lovey dovey, but I recall there was some bad blood for a long while ... ?

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                      • #12
                        Protests in 1968 were just in the air ... here, there and everywhere...


                        In 1968, students in Mexico City challenged the country's government. On Oct. 2, troops opened fire on a crowd of student demonstrators. Forty years later, the exact death toll remains a mystery. But official documents suggest that military snipers may have triggered the massacre.






                        Last edited by user4; 05-07-2015, 08:20 PM.

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                        • #13
                          In his book "Blackthink' by Jesse Owens he talks about how Tommies wife was the real militant and how Carlos (who grew up n Harlem) had to coax.push Tommie, he wasn't all that keen on the idea.

                          I worked with Willie Neal (uncle of NFLer Lorenzo Neal) who ran with Tommie at Lemoore HS (about 60 miles west of me). He talked about that wasn't the Tommie Smith he knew.

                          Lemoore Cali has a huge air base, the city is used to black servicemen, this wasn't Harlem or Mobile Alabama. I grew up around here about the time Tommie did, and competed in track and football and never saw any racial anythings.

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