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  • + 2.0

    When did this +2.0 wind assistance thing come into play? The origins of it?

  • #2
    What was used in the U.S. when English distances were used?

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    • #3
      4.473 mph.

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      • #4
        Came about as result of research by (i think) German scientists in the early '30s, and was implemented by the IAAF in international competition at Berlin '36 as I recall.

        2.0 was chosen as the number which represented the amount of wind which they calculated which would improve a 100-meter time by 0.1 (the standard of measure at the time), so it was meant to prevent an "unfair" breaking a the World Record.

        of course, if they held to that metric today, with 100th-second timing, the wind limit shouold be 0.2 mps, but that's another story altogether.

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        • #5
          Thank you gh, I appreciated that

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          • #6
            Originally posted by halharkness View Post
            4.473 mph.
            Snark or did they use the metric wind speed?

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            • #7
              4.473mph = 2mps

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              • #8
                Until the U.S. conversion to metric distances in the mid- to -late 1970s--the dates vary depending on the level of competition--virtually all U.S. wind readings were taken in miles per hour, usually to the first decimal.

                It's important to realize this when looking at old results when wind readings listed but with no mention of mph or mps.

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                • #9
                  Do I recall that from that era U.S. readings were actually frequently reported in fps, not mph?

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                  • #10
                    I don't remember this at all. But then, most stories mentioning specific wind readings were written by people who would have known how to properly report the wind. The number of times the agate would have included a wind reading must have been exceptionally rare.

                    I'm guessing only a person who saw printed results at a meet would have seen something listed as feet-per-second.

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                    • #11
                      i'm willing to bet there are fps readings in T&FN and/or TN in the '60s. Maybe even in the '70s. I know in my early days as Statistician I had to do conversions from time to time.

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                      • #12
                        GH - You're right. While mph was generally used, the 1964 NCAA results were reported with fps winds, as one example.
                        The 2.0 wind rule was proposed by Germany at the 1930 IAAF meeting, and was eventually approved 6 years later
                        I had an idea that some research into this had been done by Nobel winner Professor AV Hill of London University. It may be though that he restricted himself to an analysis of the accuracy of hand timing

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