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WRs In The NCAA Championships

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  • The Kitchen Cynic
    replied
    Re: WRs In The NCAA Championships

    >In talking about Salazar's proposed WR I said "recognized". I didn't say recognized by whom. If you asked most world class marathoners in 1982 what the WR was I would say over 80% would have given you Salazars time. That is what I meant as recognized.<

    The only thing that most people recognize now about that performance is that the course that Salazar ran was approximately 150 meters short. USATF recognized that fact with a notation in their records lists, and so did the IAAF when they omitted the mark from its listing of the progression of world bests.

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  • 5k Guy
    replied
    Re: WRs In The NCAA Championships

    In talking about Salazar's proposed WR I said "recognized". I didn't say recognized by whom. If you asked most world class marathoners in 1982 what the WR was I would say over 80% would have given you Salazars time. That is what I meant as recognized.

    Call it "the peoples record" if you would like.

    In fact on many WR progression lists Salazar's time is on there.

    Maybe a clarification would be to call it a World best rather than World record.

    Leave a comment:


  • tandfman
    replied
    Re: WRs In The NCAA Championships

    >Big D is the right answer.... for ratified records....<

    If you include non-ratified ones, there were a few in the women's triple jump, which was an NCAA championship event years before the IAAF added it to their program and started recognizing WR's in it.

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  • tandfman
    replied
    Re: WRs In The NCAA Championships

    >Salazar's 2:08:13 in NYC Marathon in 1981 or 82 (can't remember off the top of my head, but 1981 I think) was the recognized WR at the time.<

    Think again. If you're talking about ratified WR's (which is what gh mentioned), Salazar's record could not have been so recognized because the IAAF didn't recognize world records in road events then.

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  • 5k Guy
    replied
    Re: WRs In The NCAA Championships

    Salazar's 2:08:13 in NYC Marathon in 1981 or 82 (can't remember off the top of my head, but 1981 I think) was the recognized WR at the time.

    Has there been a more recent one on US soil?

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  • KeepMoving
    replied
    Re: WRs In The NCAA Championships

    How about world records set in the United States?

    And forget about nonsense distances in yards and
    stuff like 1600M and 3200M, or anything indoors, which doesn't count for s**t, unless you are a female vaulter, apparently...

    Leave a comment:


  • bf
    replied
    Re: WRs In The NCAA Championships

    (Nehemiah, 12.91, '79)

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  • bf
    replied
    Re: WRs In The NCAA Championships

    How about wind-aided fastest-ever (at the time)?

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  • gh
    replied
    Re: WRs In The NCAA Championships

    Big D is the right answer.... for ratified records....

    Leave a comment:


  • tc
    replied
    Re: WRs In The NCAA Championships

    Dwight Stones set a HJ record six years after Mann's run. Can't remember anything more recent.

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  • gh
    replied
    Re: WRs In The NCAA Championships

    Getting warmer.

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  • tc
    replied
    Re: WRs In The NCAA Championships

    Ralph Mann's WR in the 440y Hurdles was the year after Mills.

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  • highjumpsteve
    replied
    Re: WRs In The NCAA Championships

    you're right... I got mixed up 'cuz I was at the '90 meet at Duke and he won. So I'm back to my Mills answer.

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  • gm
    replied
    Re: WRs In The NCAA Championships

    >thought of a later one.... Boden from ( Texas ? ) in new JT... about 1990.

    actually, that was at a quad meet in Austin, IIRC

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  • kuha
    replied
    Re: WRs In The NCAA Championships

    The frequency of these will pretty closely parallel the number of WRs set on US soil... Who wants to do the research and make the graphs?

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