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  • #31
    Originally posted by jhc68
    Ah, the straddle inventor question!

    There may be some dispute about the first straddler, and I'd defer to Per to answer that one. Someone in the 1930's, most likely, who modified the side-to-the bar clearance of the Western Roll to a belly-to-the bar mode. I'd opine that Les Steers was the first straddler to establish clear dominance in the event, setting a world record in 1941 and (maybe) clearing an unofficial 7 feet in an indoor exhibition.

    But neither Steers nor any of the other great straddlers could have employed the Flop before the common usage of foam landing pits in the 1960's due to almost certain paraplegia resulting from any awkward landing on sand or sawdust surfaces.
    I was thinking Charles Dumas after all he set the standard for the modern jumpers of today clearing the 7-0 barrier.Good thing bringing up paraplegia I wonder if folks told Fosbury he could have the "pleasure" of experiencing this?

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    • #32
      Originally posted by dal4018
      Originally posted by jhc68
      Wonder who invented the straddle would have like to seen him do the Fosbury Flop instead.
      Say, what?
      I was just curious jhc68 that's all as to who started the Straddle.
      I don't know who was straddling before Dave Albritton (OG silver in '36), but I suspect there was someone. Albritton was probably the first one who had been seen both in North America and Europe. After Albritton, you get Les Steers. They were both seen in person and in newsreels by a great many people and were often the subject of coaching clinics.

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      • #33
        I agree about Albritton.

        The problem in identifying the exact first straddler is that when the "no diving rule" got removed in the early 30's, the evolution from Western Roll to the straddle became almost natural.
        So various jumpers could have been playing with this technique.

        BTW - The Swedish, Norwegian, Danish name for the straddle is "Dykk stil" (Diving style)

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Per Andersen
          I agree about Albritton.

          The problem in identifying the exact first straddler is that when the "no diving rule" got removed in the early 30's, the evolution from Western Roll to the straddle became almost natural.
          So various jumpers could have been playing with this technique.

          BTW - The Swedish, Norwegian, Danish name for the straddle is "Dykk stil" (Diving style)
          Per before Dumas cracked the 7-0 barrier who held the world mark just curious???????

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by dal4018
            Before Dumas cracked the 7-0 barrier who held the world mark just curious???????
            This link will be useful

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            • #36
              I've made this point before

              Originally posted by paulthefan
              he was a big dude, was he over 6'5"? I can imagine a very big guy 6'7"+ straddling over 8 foot, but not someone shorter than that.
              Why? So many people overrate height when it comes to the HJ, possibly because height is so important in basketball. The reason height is so important in basketball is that the altitude of the outstretched arms and hands is paramount. In the high jump however the entire body must achieve a certain height. That is why there have been many relatively short (i.e. normal-sized) high jumpers lke Livers, Holm, etc.

              I cringe every time I hear the expression "he jumped so many inches over his head"

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Daisy
                Originally posted by dal4018
                Before Dumas cracked the 7-0 barrier who held the world mark just curious???????
                This link will be useful
                No it wasn't thanks Daisy

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by dal4018
                  No it wasn't
                  Are you joking? There were multiple links to various sites with the information.

                  “Give a man a fish; you have fed him for today. Teach a man to fish; and you have fed him for a lifetime”

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Daisy
                    Originally posted by dal4018
                    No it wasn't
                    Are you joking? There were multiple links to various sites with the information.

                    “Give a man a fish; you have fed him for today. Teach a man to fish; and you have fed him for a lifetime”
                    Sorry Daisy didn't mean to put it in that way very informative you taught me to fish thanks.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Daisy
                      Originally posted by dal4018
                      Before Dumas cracked the 7-0 barrier who held the world mark just curious???????
                      This link will be useful
                      That was magic! How did you do that??!!

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        He (or rather the underlying site) used JavaScript (or a similar technology) to
                        manipulate the contents of the input field, the position of a simulated
                        mouse-pointer, and a few other things---in combination with delayed action. The
                        idea is bloody brilliant, but there is no magic involved in the actual
                        implementation: The basic building blocks are used by websites all the time.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          J.Kenneth Doherty's "Modern Track and Field" (1963) makes reference to "this styleof clearance was first jumped in big time competition by Jim Stewart (USC), NCAA champion in 1930. Dean Cromwell (his college coach) gives a tongue-in-cheek explanation of how Stewart invented this form: "He said he had been raised on a ranch and needed considerable agility at the fences when the cattle went rampaging. At first he took the barbed wire fences with the scissors high jump form, but he found this dorsal clearance both destructive for the seat of his trousers and unpleasant anatomically. Finally, he said, since the cattle didn't get any more peaceful and the fences didn't get any lower, he was forced to use the technique of the belly roll, for with this form he could hold down the the barbed wire as he rolled over it. I never believed Jim's yarn either"

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                          • #43
                            My friend Geoff Nelson, who has made a lifetime study of the straddle high jump and has an 800 page unpublished historical study of the technique, recently forwarded this comment about early straddlers to me (including the aforementioned Stewart):

                            To be brief, the straddle was first used, at least, at the 1908 Olympics. A straddler not mentioned is Wesley Oler who jumped at the 1912 Games. Gil Cruter was using the straddle before Albritton. James Stewart belly rolled to a 1930 NCAA title. He placed 4th at the 1928 OG in the decathlon, tried three times to jump for USC, finally got in, should have been on the 1932 team in the dec - it's a long story - but wasn't and then tried to make the team in the HJ and didn't. Marquette's Ed Burke, who set an indoor WR in '36 - hours after Cruter had set it - was another early straddler.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by jhc68
                              My friend Geoff Nelson, who has made a lifetime study of the straddle high jump and has an 800 page unpublished historical study of the technique, recently forwarded this comment about early straddlers to me (including the aforementioned Stewart):

                              To be brief, the straddle was first used, at least, at the 1908 Olympics. A straddler not mentioned is Wesley Oler who jumped at the 1912 Games. Gil Cruter was using the straddle before Albritton. James Stewart belly rolled to a 1930 NCAA title. He placed 4th at the 1928 OG in the decathlon, tried three times to jump for USC, finally got in, should have been on the 1932 team in the dec - it's a long story - but wasn't and then tried to make the team in the HJ and didn't. Marquette's Ed Burke, who set an indoor WR in '36 - hours after Cruter had set it - was another early straddler.
                              The question is though. When was the straddle recognized as a separate technique from the Roll? Horine is recognized as the inventor of the Western Roll in about 1912.
                              Very interesting if the first Roller and a real straddler both jumped in the 1912 Games.
                              I don't dispute that there could have been jumpers who took off from the inside leg prior to Horine.
                              At a primitive level it is very possible to jump in a way where it is impossible to identify it as either a Roll variation or a straddle variation.

                              Cruter was almost certainly the first Dive straddler. His technique was adopted by the Swedish Dive straddlers of the early 50's.

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                              • #45
                                Part 2 of Yashchenko posted Youtube July 15.
                                Cool footage.

                                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hl1JclV1 ... re=related

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