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  • #46
    Originally posted by LopenUupunut View Post
    Was Otto Peltzer a doctor of medicine?.
    This biography seems to imply that his doctorate degree was for post-graduate work in economics, law and social politics.

    https://www.theguardian.com/sport/20...9/olympicgames

    Originally posted by LopenUupunut View Post
    He was called "Doctor" a lot
    While Peltzer probably derserved the title as a PhD, the same cannot be said for Darvis "Doc" Patton.

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    • #47
      Thanks!

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      • #48
        Originally posted by DrJay View Post
        One thing this thread reminds me of is the difficulty T&F athletes thinking of a career in medicine face if they are national/world class. I'm sure Dan Lincoln had a few more good years and maybe a couple more ARs in him when 3rd year (and beyond) med school put paid to serious running. Throw XX chromosomes into the mix and it's that much harder. When do I start med school? When do I have children?

        If one carries their running career through to, say, 34, starts med school then, finishes at 38, picks a wimpy little three-year residency like internal medicine (as opposed to a manly 5+ years in ortho like bambam and then maybe a fellowship), one is 41+ when they finish. Or, rather, when they start. It takes a long time, maybe a decade or more, out in practice before one realizes, hey, I'm starting to feel like maybe I know what I'm doing. I went straight through, HS, college, med school, residency, so was only 29 when I was done with medical training.
        I was out for 7 years between college and med school. 6 years basically playing pro golf, and 1 year of school to get back into med school. I was 38 when I finished my residency. My residency was 6 years long back then, + 6 months of fellowship. So I started practicing about 2 months before I turned 39. And I graduated college at 21 yo, which is a little young.

        As to DrJay's next comment, Bryan Allf was an intern in medicine when I was a medical student. I got to know a very little bit. Recall having lunch with him one day in the hospital cafeteria, but certainly did not know him well.

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        • #49
          If we're still looking for a 4x1 leg, Arthur Porritt (NZ), 100m bronze '24. Surgeon to George VI and Elizabeth II; Governor General of New Zealand.

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          • #50
            Bill Rea:

            http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/...-1980-olympics

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            • #51
              lots of dodgy facts in that one

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              • #52
                You mean like this:" 'I met Carl Lewis in Madison Square Garden in 1980. I have jumped against him about 50 times and beat him many times,' Rea said."

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                • #53
                  Former high school decathlon record holder Craig Brigham was a doctor, as is his former University of Oregon teammate Terry Williams.

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                  • #54
                    Craig was an orthopaedic spine specialist at OrthoCarolina in Charlotte, before he died fairly young a few years ago. A good friend of mine at that group, Dave Mauerhan, went to Duke with me. Dave is about 6-4, was 225 or so in college and walked on to both Duke football and basketball, and was a very good athlete. Dave told me about working out with Craig and said the guy could still dust him in everything.

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                    • #55
                      Interesting topic of combining academic-athletic careers which was the purpose goal of intercollegiate sport from the beginning of time (specifically, 1874).
                      At the first intercollegiate track championship held on Sunday, July 20, 1874 at Saratoga the first mile champion was Ernest Roscoe Copeland with winning time of 4:58.2. Copeland was in graduate science program ( pre med) at Cornell. He graduated in 1875 and entered Indiana University Medical School and earned his MD degree in 1879. He practiced in Mikwaukee and was a prominent surgeon and patron of the arts in that city. He died in 1929.
                      There is no question that the "all time" miler/ physician is either Jack Lovelock, with world 1500 m record and Olympic gold medal to his resume, or Roger Banister for historic mile record and the most distinguished medical career in Neurology ( international reputation in Autonomic Nervous System disorders and editor of the famous "Lord Brain's Neurology" Text

                      Interested in any other nominations of miler/ physician nominations.

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                      • #56
                        How about a physician/coach? Garfield "Doc" Weede played football at the University of Penn, where he was a Walter Camp All-American on an undefeated national championship and, then earned his DDS in 1906. His dental practice was short-lived as he coached track and field from 1906 to 1951. He was one of the first college coaches to "break the color line" after he arrived at Pittsburg (KS) State in 1919. During his tenure, his relay teams were among the most consistent winners at the nation’s major track meets and captured 15 conference titles including 11 consecutive. Weede retired as the winningest coach in the college division of the Drake relays with 27 relay victories and also coached 22 relay wins for PSU at the KU Relays. In 1930, his Gorillas upset Notre Dame and Marquette in the Central Collegiate Meet in Milwaukee. Weede is also a member of several halls of fame, including the Helms Foundation, NAIA Track and Field, Kansas Sports, the Drake Relays, and (of course) Pittsburg State.

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                        • #57
                          A healthcare practitioner with only a DDS or DMD is not considered a physician in the United States.

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                          • #58
                            the startign point of this thread said nothing about physicians. Quite the contrary: <<An off-the-top-of-my-head attempt to pick the all-time best (most notable) for each event who ended up in a medical field. This includes doctors, dentists and technicians. Man or woman.

                            I'm sure there's lots of nurses out there I'm unaware of. Veterinarians are eligible, but couldn't think of one.>>

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                            • #59
                              Honorable mention to the dentist Gary Veregin of the late Trackwire publication, a great guy.
                              Last edited by BillVol; 01-16-2017, 02:48 PM.

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                              • #60
                                Originally posted by midwestfan View Post
                                There is no question that the "all time" miler/ physician is either Jack Lovelock, with world 1500 m record and Olympic gold medal to his resume, or Roger Banister for historic mile record and the most distinguished medical career in Neurology ( international reputation in Autonomic Nervous System disorders and editor of the famous "Lord Brain's Neurology" Text

                                Interested in any other nominations of miler/ physician nominations.
                                Dr. Peter Snell is in that league. He's already been mentioned on this thread.

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