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  • #91
    Originally posted by Pego View Post

    That is correct. I heard Sir Roger give a talk once at the annual meeting of American Academy of Neurology. Never got to actually meet him.
    You and I must have been at same meeting with Sir Roger Bannister. I met him at AAN Meeting in Chicago in 1979 in early May. He gave a Friday late afternoon talk on his specialty, Autonomic Nervous System. I stayed to the end just to ask a question and have him sign the cover of magazine that had his picture crossing the finish line for his sub 4:00 mile.
    He went to back of the room after the talk and there were several other doctors in line to ask him questions. When it came to my turn, I apologized to him for the absent media attention that the Chicago news (TV and print) gave to his presence in the Windy City. It was his 25th anniversary of the mile run, actually about a week from the exact date. Not one mention that he was in town or the guest speaker at our convention.
    I asked no neurological questions, and asked how he was to celebrate his anniversary when he returned home? Also if he was still running/jogging?
    I asked if would be so kind to sign the magazine which he did. (I did brag a little about my background and he talked about "youngster" getting better and better each year which was very good for the sport. ) I shook his hand and only wished we had cell phones back then for a "selfie"

    It was one of those moments says "If you could meet and have dinner with only three people who ever lived in this world, who would they be?" I succeeded in one/two of the parts of the question....meet not dinner.
    Pego, was that the AAN Meeting you were referring to in Chicago, 1979?

    Comment


    • #92
      It could have been. I went to so many, and that one I am pretty sure I attended. Where did you train? I did my residency with Bill Sibley in Tucson in early 70s.
      "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
      by Thomas Henry Huxley

      Comment


      • #93
        Originally posted by midwestfan View Post

        You and I must have been at same meeting with Sir Roger Bannister. I met him at AAN Meeting in Chicago in 1979 in early May. He gave a Friday late afternoon talk on his specialty, Autonomic Nervous System. I stayed to the end just to ask a question and have him sign the cover of magazine that had his picture crossing the finish line for his sub 4:00 mile.
        He went to back of the room after the talk and there were several other doctors in line to ask him questions. When it came to my turn, I apologized to him for the absent media attention that the Chicago news (TV and print) gave to his presence in the Windy City. It was his 25th anniversary of the mile run, actually about a week from the exact date. Not one mention that he was in town or the guest speaker at our convention.
        I asked no neurological questions, and asked how he was to celebrate his anniversary when he returned home? Also if he was still running/jogging?
        I asked if would be so kind to sign the magazine which he did. (I did brag a little about my background and he talked about "youngster" getting better and better each year which was very good for the sport. ) I shook his hand and only wished we had cell phones back then for a "selfie"

        It was one of those moments says "If you could meet and have dinner with only three people who ever lived in this world, who would they be?" I succeeded in one/two of the parts of the question....meet not dinner.
        Pego, was that the AAN Meeting you were referring to in Chicago, 1979?
        In the 90s, Bannister was interviewed for Runners World and had one of the great answers I've ever heard. They asked if he still ran, and he told them he could not, because he had broken his ankle a few year before and it prevented from running, but he said, "Now, I ride a bike - for the good sense of muscles happily tired." What a great description of the feeling you get after exercise.

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        • #94
          I was fortunate enough to have briefly met Bannister on the 40th anniversary of his sub-4, and one of my med school professors had contributed a chapter to his textbook on autonomic neuropathy, so we shared a chuckle over our mutual acquaintance. My professor was, to put it mildly, a colorful character named Otto Appenzeller!

          Comment


          • #95
            You are absolutely correct, bambam. That was the answer he gave me in our 1979 meeting. On the question of personal anniversary celebration of his record run he said "usually nothing much" occasionally Brasher, Chataway, and he will meet at a pub and have a talk and drink on that event. He was a very humble man. His first question to me was "how was my talk, did you learn anything new from it". I remember it being very boring as he delivered it in his deep, low tone British accident which was hard for me to understand and to follow. I had to say to him, however, it was great and I learned a lot.

            Pego: I finished my Neurology and Pediatric Neurology in 1973 at University of Minnesota, under Drs. A.B. Baker and Ken Swaimen, both were the founders of AAN and CNS.


            Here is an athlete and medical doctor quiz:
            What two runners broke a World Record in the same event, both never won an Olympic medal, both became medical doctors and both trained and practiced in the same specialty field?
            (The clue is the first letter of the alphabet)

            Comment


            • #96
              Originally posted by midwestfan
              Pego: I finished my Neurology and Pediatric Neurology in 1973 at University of Minnesota, under Drs. A.B. Baker and Ken Swaimen, both were the founders of AAN and CNS.
              That is when I arrived to central Wisconsin. Have met both A.B. Baker and Ken Swaiman. Frank Foerster was Baker's parallel in Madison.
              "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
              by Thomas Henry Huxley

              Comment


              • #97
                GH, Thanks for the Geoff Stiles PV mention, a teammate of mine at Harvard in the late 1970s! :-)
                Retired triple jumper and paying the price! Son of Al Hall

                Comment


                • #98
                  Midwestfan, you and the other MDs here are a rare treasure.

                  Comment


                  • #99
                    Becky Spies was an NCAA all-American miler for Villanova in the 1990s (and the winner of six Penn Relays watches). Now a pathologist in California.

                    http://aebpath.com/main/doctor/dr-becky-swain/

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                    • What do Jack Lovelock, Arthur Porritt and Becky Spies have in common?

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                      • Can’t be New Zealand connection. Could be Rhodes Scholar to Oxford as Becky Spies and Lovelock were recipients of this award. I know nothing about Arthur Porritt? I know we had a thread about Rhodes Scholars and world record holders in past. Norman Tabor was first WR and Rhodes Scholar in 1913. My knowledge is only on Spies and Lovelock at this time.

                        Comment


                        • That's the answer then. Porritt was a Rhodes Scholar too.

                          Comment


                          • Spies was never an Olympian but here's the list of Olympians in track & field athletics who were Rhodes Scholars:

                            Ranjit Bhatia IND ATH 1960 1957 Rhodes Scholar – Jesus College
                            Simon Hollingsworth AUS ATH 1992-96 1997 Rhodes Scholar – Exeter College
                            David Johnson CAN ATH 1924 1923 Rhodes Scholar – Balliol College
                            Wilfred Kalaugher NZL ATH 1928 1927 Rhodes Scholar – Balliol College
                            Wilfred Kent-Hughes AUS ATH 1920 1915 Rhodes Scholar – Christ Church College
                            Jack Lovelock NZL ATH 1932-36 1931 Rhodes Scholar – Exeter College
                            Arthur Porritt NZL ATH 1924-28 1923 Rhodes Scholar – Magdalen College
                            Eric Prabhakar IND ATH 1948 1948 Rhodes Scholar – Christ Church College
                            Bevil Rudd RSA ATH 1920 1913 Rhodes Scholar – Trinity College
                            Bill Stevenson USA ATH 1924 1922 Rhodes Scholar – Balliol College
                            Harvey Sutton ANZ ATH 1908 1905 Rhodes Scholar – New College
                            Norm Taber USA ATH 1912 1913 Rhodes Scholar – St. John’s College

                            Comment


                            • Midwestfan nailed it again! I'll have to stop with questions involving Villanova and middle distance runners. . .

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by midwestfan View Post
                                I know nothing about Arthur Porritt?
                                I'd never heard of Spies and now that I've looked her up, I know why. She's clearly nowhere near the athletic class of Porrit or Lovelock, both of whom I knew who had competitions named after them, admittedly in NZ. I also knew both had attended Oxford but didn't twig to the Rhodes connection (Rhodes is scholarship to Oxford alone). Would anybody have guessed correctly if I had asked the same question with Hollingsworth substituted for Spies? Of course not, go on, just try to name Hollingsworth's event!

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