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Pac 12 indoor championships?

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  • bambam1729
    replied
    Buck Kipe? Sounds like a name out of Mad Magazine.

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  • gh
    replied
    Predated me too. As I recall, the first guy who ever started punching holes in the wall (so the lore had it) was Buck Kipe, who was an NCAA scorer in '64.

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  • Tuariki
    replied
    Originally posted by gh View Post
    the measuring up the wall predated Chaplin
    Aha. So it was from your time then. Damn you are ancient.
    Last edited by Tuariki; 03-12-2017, 08:38 AM.

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  • gh
    replied
    the measuring up the wall predated Chaplin

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  • Tuariki
    replied
    Originally posted by gh View Post
    What Tuariki doesn't mention here is that when you take an unheated cement wall in way-below-freezing temperatures and you have people exercising like mad (sometimes including the baseball team on the infield at the same time, which made for an interesting dynamic) you get all kinds of rime buildup.

    I'd also note taht the wall that Tuariki refers to the javelins stickiing in was simple plywood and on the other side of the wall the spear might poke through into the ROTC room or higher up the weightroom.
    And Every thrower who increased the Hollingberry "height" record for the javelin was proudly and loudly proclaimed by Coach Chaplin as the new world record holder for the indoor javelin.

    You gotta love the promotional wizardry of Chaplin. Throws were measured to the base of the wall, then up the wall.
    Last edited by Tuariki; 03-11-2017, 10:03 AM.

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  • lonewolf
    replied
    Ah, the good old days..
    The indoor "track" at OkSt was a dirt oval (rectangle) of indeterminate length, studded with concrete pillars , in the basement of Gallager (now Gallager-Iba) arena. Primitive LJ and HJ pits, weights and gymnastic equipment in the infield, ceiling too low for shotput.. as far as I know, there was never any competition held there.. it was pretty musty but a little warmer in the winter.

    At OU the "indoor" track, affectionally known as Pneumonia Downs, was at ground level under the unheated east side of the football stadium. long and narrow track, probably. 220 yds. They did hold some competition there in the 1940s and early 1950s but that space has disappeared in the many renovations increasing the stadium capacity from 30,000 to 100,000.
    Last edited by lonewolf; 03-10-2017, 05:48 PM.

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  • LopenUupunut
    replied
    gh's NCAA history suggests the NCAA steeple has always been metric; presumably because it was introduced so late. Before 1959 it was only part of the program in a few Olympic years ('48/'52/'56), and in Olympic years the NCAA usually used metric distances even for normally imperial events.

    ---

    Quick question for everybody: does anybody here (dj?) know the exact specs for the American indoor steeplechase races of the 1930s and 1940s? I found an ugly Google Books preview of Quercetani's SC history book, which describes the 1937 AAU indoor SC race as "20 hurdle jumps and 20 wall jumps"; at 11 laps/mile, that would mean one hurdle jump and one wall jump per lap. What was a wall jump like, and why were the best times ~20 seconds faster than contemporary outdoor SC times if the total number of barriers was higher than outdoors?

    Leave a comment:


  • BillVol
    replied
    Originally posted by bambam1729 View Post
    Don't know but can tell you - at the AAU Meet, prior to 1932 it was always held at 2 miles, except for the Olympic Trials years of 1920 and 1928, and for some reason, it was again held at 2 miles in 1953-55 and 1957.
    Thanks. Was wondering because the SEC record book has the steeple divided into 3000M and discontinued events. From '73-'76 it's listed under "Former Events."

    Whenever you look around at different sources, it's amazing the discrepancies you run into. It makes me appreciate even more the work of T&FN with a bazillion numbers in each edition and rarely a mistake.

    http://assets.espn.go.com/SEC/media/...ord%20Book.pdf

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  • gh
    replied
    Originally posted by Tuariki View Post
    When I was at WSU (1970-1974) we had our annual indoor meet in an in heated Hollingberry Fieldhouse - got pretty cold when it was 10 degrees F outside. 220 yard dirt track. Even had the javelin. The winner was always the thrower whose javelin was measured highest up the wall at the other end.
    What Tuariki doesn't mention here is that when you take an unheated cement wall in way-below-freezing temperatures and you have people exercising like mad (sometimes including the baseball team on the infield at the same time, which made for an interesting dynamic) you get all kinds of rime buildup.

    I'd also note taht the wall that Tuariki refers to the javelins stickiing in was simple plywood and on the other side of the wall the spear might poke through into the ROTC room or higher up the weightroom.

    Leave a comment:


  • bambam1729
    replied
    Originally posted by BillVol View Post
    Great story about WSU. Without starting another thread, could I ask another question? Has the steeple ever been run in the NCAA at a distance other than 3000M?
    Don't know but can tell you - at the AAU Meet, prior to 1932 it was always held at 2 miles, except for the Olympic Trials years of 1920 and 1928, and for some reason, it was again held at 2 miles in 1953-55 and 1957.

    Leave a comment:


  • BillVol
    replied
    Great story about WSU. Without starting another thread, could I ask another question? Has the steeple ever been run in the NCAA at a distance other than 3000M?

    Leave a comment:


  • NotDutra5
    replied
    Originally posted by Tuariki View Post
    When I was at WSU (1970-1974) we had our annual indoor meet in an in heated Hollingberry Fieldhouse - got pretty cold when it was 10 degrees F outside. 220 yard dirt track. Even had the javelin. The winner was always the thrower whose javelin was measured highest up the wall at the other end.
    That's great.

    I hope someone had the good sense to paint a bullseye on the wall.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tuariki
    replied
    When I was at WSU (1970-1974) we had our annual indoor meet in an in heated Hollingberry Fieldhouse - got pretty cold when it was 10 degrees F outside. 220 yard dirt track. Even had the javelin. The winner was always the thrower whose javelin was measured highest up the wall at the other end.

    Leave a comment:


  • NotDutra5
    replied
    Doesn't the Pac 12 compete in the Mountain Pacific champs along with a few added schools from the West? The compete at Dempsey.

    Leave a comment:


  • AyZiggy
    replied
    IIRC, the Pac-8 didn't even have a cross country championship until 1969.

    Leave a comment:

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