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  • Jesse Owens training?

    Does anyone have any information on how Jesse Owens trained and the yearly organization, etc.? Sorry if this has been answered before.

  • #2
    not a subject i ever recall seeing addressed here (or anywhere, for that matter!).

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    • #3
      Nor have I

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      • #4
        Cant be that much different than other ohio state athletes ie Glenn Davis, etc.

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        • #5
          practice? Practice? Practice??

          Calisthenics. Probably a few starts, and a time trial. No weights.

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          • #6
            An interesting question, would love to see the kind of exercises and routine he did back then

            The only thing I can find is Snyder holding a stick about 10m ahead of him to encourage him to stay low out of the start

            There are a few pictures on google under ''Jesse Owens training''

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            • #7
              Snyder liked the stick. He also used a stick or a hurdle in the LJ pit to get Owens to gain height in the LJ.

              I can't cite a source for this info, most likely conversation(s) with Ken Doherty. One might check the first couple editions of Doherty's "Track & Field Omnibook" or his earlier "Modern Training for Running." I don't know if Snyder ever published a training book.

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              • #8
                Some perspective: Jesse had the LJ record at OSU that endured into the 1990s, .. that is over 30 years of the cinder era and then another more than 20 years into the synthetic runway era. Snyder might have been a great coach, he might have been an ordinary coach, but it just didnt matter much, because he had the best athlete of the century.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by user4 View Post
                  Snyder might have been a great coach, he might have been an ordinary coach, but it just didnt matter much, because he had the best athlete of the century.
                  I think that is it... some cats got, some cats don't.

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                  • #10
                    Makes me wonder again a question that I'd discussed with a trainer friend: would one say that the training methods 80 years ago has changed much, or has it remained much?

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                    • #11
                      Dunno about 80 years ago but judging from comments on this forum training regimes and scheduling competition are a hell of lot more intense and complicated than they were 70 years ago.

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                      • #12
                        Yes a training manual by Hal Higdon that I read (and translated) states that in Rudolf Harbig's time a typical workout by a 800m runner would be 3 repeats of 200m...sounds weird and too light to say the least

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                        • #13
                          If he was like my dad, who ran track in the 1930s, he limited his smoking to half a dozen cigarettes during track season and he had a Hershey bar for energy just before a meet.

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                          • #14
                            In an article I just read from 1937, Jesse said his mantra was 'slow and steady' as opposed to the 'intensive' coaching that he thought caused British athletes to under-perform at the Berlin Games.

                            He described his preparation as just a normal life - with no fads or special diet. He did not smoke or drink and said his preferred tipple was milk which he could drink 'all the time and never tire of it'. His bed-time was 9.30 and woke at 6.30 - nine hours sleep EVERY night.

                            He was careful to not over-train and early in his preparation took care never to tire himself out, jogging along slowly and steadily. He would never attempt pistol starts or mad dashes early in his training. After three weeks he would try to run half a mile at steady pace and each day increase his speed.

                            Will have a look for some more.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Vault-emort View Post
                              In an article I just read from 1937, Jesse said his mantra was 'slow and steady' as opposed to the 'intensive' coaching that he thought caused British athletes to under-perform at the Berlin Games.

                              He described his preparation as just a normal life - with no fads or special diet. He did not smoke or drink and said his preferred tipple was milk which he could drink 'all the time and never tire of it'. His bed-time was 9.30 and woke at 6.30 - nine hours sleep EVERY night.

                              He was careful to not over-train and early in his preparation took care never to tire himself out, jogging along slowly and steadily. He would never attempt pistol starts or mad dashes early in his training. After three weeks he would try to run half a mile at steady pace and each day increase his speed.

                              Will have a look for some more.
                              That's great general information. Thank you!

                              Interesting how different the approach was. Never tire out in early preparation?!

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