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  • "105"

    Happy 73rd birthday today (Sunday) to an Olympic champion who became the first athlete from a certain country to win a certain event in about 72 years.

    This birthday champion competed in only one Olympic Games because of injury.

    Our birthday athlete was born in an Olympic city, although it was not an Olympic city at the time of this person's birth.

    You might remember that our birthday individual got tonsillitis two years before winning the Olympic gold medal.

    No hurdles were involved in our birthday athlete's Olympic event.

    Born on a Sunday 73 years ago, this champion struck Olympic gold at the age of 23.

    Equaling the world record at the Olympics, this athlete went on to graduate from the Harvard Business School.

    Who is our birthday athlete for this day before Abraham Lincoln's 209th birthday?

  • #2
    Ralph Doubell?

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    • #3
      Happy birthday today (73) to Ralph Doubell. Very good, Olli. Ralph Doubell won the 800 in Mexico City (1968) matching Peter Snell's world mark from 1962. This was the second time an Australian won the men's Olympic 800. The first time was Edwin Flack in 1896. Doubell ran about 27 seconds faster than Flack, however Flack had to run on a dirt track in the 19th Century.

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      • #4
        And Doubell had trained.

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        • #5
          I'm sure Flack trained, too, but nothing like Doubell's work under Franz Stampfl. This leads to the question "How fast could Flack had run had he had a coach like Stampfl, the use of all-weather tracks, and enough time each day to train?"

          The answer is probably that we will never know, but it makes for some interesting discussion.

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          • #6
            By the way, how is "105" related to Doubell? He got under 105 seconds for sure, but is that it?

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            • #7
              The 1896 track was super-slow even by the standards of 19th-century tracks. Consider that Tom Burke won the 400 in 54 1-5, and he was legitimately the best quarter-miler of his time - at least on the amateur side - with a 48 4-5 personal best in the 440. Flack's winning time in the 1500 was 4:33, but he beat Albin Lermusiaux, who was a 4:10 man at home.
              Last edited by LopenUupunut; 02-12-2018, 01:26 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Olli View Post
                By the way, how is "105" related to Doubell? He got under 105 seconds for sure, but is that it?
                Ralph Doubell wore number "105" while winning the gold in Mexico City.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by LopenUupunut View Post
                  The 1896 track was super-slow even by the standards of 19th-century tracks. Consider that Tom Burke won the 400 in 54 1-5, and he was legitimately the best quarter-miler of his time - at least on the amateur side - with a 48 4-5 personal best in the 440. Flack's winning time in the 1500 was 4:33, but he beat Albin Lermusiaux, who was a 4:10 man at home.
                  Part of the reason, if you've ever seen it, is that the track was 330 m in circumference, with long straightaways and very tight turns, making a 400 m very difficult. If you go there now, and even at the 2004 Olympics for the marathon, the track has been extended so it is 400 m, but still very narrow turns.

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