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Ryun, Keino & career lengths

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  • #16
    Originally posted by catson52 View Post
    Thanks for a timely reminder.
    ...and on the diseases front, an article from 1972:

    While more than a little impressed by Ryun's return, Keino isn't about to concede the gold medal. The 32-year-old police inspector is still an extraordinary athlete in superb condition. Until Ryun's run at Toronto, Keino had the year's fastest 1,500, a 3:36.8, and he did it over a terrible track at Mombasa while suffering from an attack of malaria.
    http://www.si.com/vault/1972/08/28/6...t-be-necessary

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    • #17
      Originally posted by tandfman View Post
      One difference, though, between Ryun and Keino. Ryun's 7 world rankings were (in order) 4,1,1,2,7,6,9. Keino was ranked 8 times, never lower than #2. Ryun definitely faded from the top later in his career (largely, I believe, because of the lingering effects of his illness). That didn't happen to Keino.
      Another difference is that Keino stayed at the top until 32, while Ryun was past him prime by 21 and gone at 25.

      Also, Keino actually ranked in 1964 - in the 5000.
      Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
        Ryun did make the 1972 Olympics...who knows what might have happened if he hadn't tripped...also Ryun was married and raising a family...so comparisons with Keino are iffy at best....imagine if the Olympics at been in 1967 at sea level what effect that would have had on Keino...Ryun would have destroyed him...

        People recover from mono....who knows what racing at 7500 did...it ruined Clarke's career...

        Anyways the 1966-7 Ryun is enough....far more than Keino ever did...how does one top that...
        As great as he was, an unbiased assessment of both can only lead to the conclusion that Keino's career successes significantly exceed Ryun's.

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        • #19
          True....but like Daniel Komen in 1996, Ryun in 1966 and 1967 was like an incredible rare meteor.

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          • #20
            What El Toro said and great article!

            On the diseases front again, not sure how bad Keino's gallbladder was in 1968, but many reports say pretty bad. Gallbladder or not, to PR in the Olympic final (1500m) at altitude (yeah I know he was altitude born and raised) is totally badass in my book.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Peter Michaelson View Post
              What El Toro said and great article!

              On the diseases front again, not sure how bad Keino's gallbladder was in 1968, but many reports say pretty bad. Gallbladder or not, to PR in the Olympic final (1500m) at altitude (yeah I know he was altitude born and raised) is totally badass in my book.
              Not sure whether running a mile or more to reach the stadium in time for the 1500m final, helped or hindered. Factor in (a) running ~9 km near the front of the 10 km race, (b) heats plus final of 5K (second to Gammoudi).

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