Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Long Jump Landings

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Long Jump Landings

    I wonder if any of you with technical knowledge, know why long jumpers (and perhaps triple jumpers as well), now sit down of fall down (backwards) on their landings, vs. in the past, jumpers would land on their feet and fall or spring forward?
    It seems the latter would give a better measurement. But perhaps one cannot put their feet as far forward doing this...?
    Any thoughts?

  • #2
    I have wondered about that too. I think maybe they now use a kind of sand that the jumper can "sail" through, so that when they sit down at the end, the mark is actually further than the original landing spot of their feet.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by noone View Post
      I have wondered about that too. I think maybe they now use a kind of sand that the jumper can "sail" through, so that when they sit down at the end, the mark is actually further than the original landing spot of their feet.
      That wouldn't help because the jump is measured from the first break in the sand nearest to the take-off board made by any part of the body.

      Comment


      • #4
        The obvious goal is to achieve maximum extension that allows jumper to fall forward instead of sitting down. Shelia Hudson, one of the smaller elite jumpers, was the master of this technique, leaving nothing but a perfectly parallel pair of size 5 footprints before bounding forward out of the pit.
        Many jumpers adopt a sideways fall to presumably minimize the loss of distance from foot plant.

        Comment


        • #5
          Maybe I didn't explain properly. Let's say the jumper lands with his heels at the 26 foot mark. He then glides through the sand before sitting down and his butt lands at the 26'6" mark. So he jumped 26 feet, just as if he had not sat down at all.

          Comment


          • #6
            Measurement is from mark in sand nearest foul line made by any part of body.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by lonewolf View Post
              Measurement is from mark in sand nearest foul line made by any part of body.
              I don't think there's any confusion about that on anybody's part, only about what it is that noone's trying to explain.

              Noone's theory isn't that sitting down behind your feet would somehow magically give you a mark that's better than the initial point where you touched the ground; rather, he's saying that the intuitive result (that sitting down behind your feet will give you a mark worse than the initial point where you touched the ground) only holds if your feet are still in the same place; if your feet have moved forward enough, you can sit down and not lose distance.

              Comment


              • #8
                The only thing that matters in the LJ is the center of gravity (~middle of your hips), so the farthest you can go is wherever the closest part of your body to the CoG hits. All you can do to extend your feet high enough to be on the same trajectory line your butt is already scribing in the air. You bend/reach forward to try and push the CoG as far forward as you can. Lewis's lean-back hitch-kick was a means to use the highest take-off angle that his speed could effectively generate and to maintain balance in the air, so he could push that CoG forward for landing.
                In older, stiffer sand, there was the possibility of overextending your feet (ahead of the CoG) and then accordioning up, keeping your butt from hitting the sand where it 'should' have. You can also see jumpers sliding off to the side trying to get the CoG on the outside of the hip - not sure if that actually extends a jump.

                Caveat - the foregoing is an amalgam of 50 years experience and (more importantly) all the biomechanics workshops I've sat through. I'd love to hear what an actual biomechanist has to say.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thank you lopenuupunut, you explained my argument well.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Now I am confused. How does feet sliding forward make any difference? I cannot imagine any configuration where a butt mark could be farther from foul line than the initial foot plant which would leave a mark.

                    Sand may vary slightly in grain size and angularity but displacement is affected more by how wet or dry it is.

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      You can't push the center of gravity forward after takeoff... your rotation around it in flight is the only thing you can control...

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        I still don't understand why this has changed. Look back at any of the 'old' jumpers - Lewis, Powell, Boston, Beamon, etc. They are all landing and falling forward, not backwards/sideways like today's jumpers.

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          My theory is that on the approach, every part of your body is essentially moving forward at the same rate but when the jumper takes off, the takeoff foot is "anchored" to the ground significantly longer than each of the approach steps.

                          The body is now a lever rotating around the fulcrum of the takeoff foot. Therefore, the jumper is rotating forward on takeoff and will end up flat on his face if he/she doesn't jump up and essentially backwards to stop the rotation.

                          Comment


                          • #15
                            I am not a coach. I don't know the physics, optimum angle, penultimate step or rotation tendency of horizontal jumping but in the last 80 of my 88 years I have competed in and officiated hundreds (thousands?) of horizontal jump competitions from elementary to Olympics.
                            Here is what I have learned:

                            When I was very young (pre-teen) before I had any coaching, I used to try to "hitch kick" like Jesse Owens in the 1936 Olympic news reels. I thought he was gaining distance. I did not know I could not jump high enough or far enough to hitch kick. I jumped 23 ' in HS without any coaching or technique because I could run pretty fast. (9.7 100y on dirt). I have never had any problem with over rotating.

                            When I got to college (1949-53), I learned the secret was to jump high, not far, and the distance would take care of its self. I practiced hitch kick but got better results by simply jumping up, concentrating on extending and dropping my feet at the last moment my momentum would carry me forward.

                            I was not a world class jumper. I was a point scorer. I was a reliable 24 footer, occasionally breaching the 25 barrier (25-6 PB) under optimum conditions with not too many other events that day.

                            I have, with their coach's permission/cooperation, made suggestions to HS jumpers with obvious requisite physique and speed that transformed natural 21 footers into 23 footers and 23 footers into 25 footers in a matter of weeks. (one prize 23 footer to 27 footer but that took a little longer)
                            So, at risk of immodesty, I feel I know a little about horizontal jumping.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X