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  • #16
    Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
    You can't push the center of gravity forward after takeoff... your rotation around it in flight is the only thing you can control...
    Of course you can, just as HJers and PVers push theirs BELOW the bar.



    As for the hitchkick's 'purpose', all LJ successful techniques counter forward rotation.

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    • #17
      You can push the center of gravity forward compared to a given part of your body, but you can't push it forward from its existing trajectory... at least not until some part of you is on the ground again.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by LopenUupunut View Post
        You can push the center of gravity forward compared to a given part of your body, but you can't push it forward from its existing trajectory... at least not until some part of you is on the ground again.
        The trajectory is indeed 'set', but you CAN affect where you'll hit the sand as you fly thru the air. So you try and push it as far 'forward' (vis-a-vis your body) as you can. When a PVer pikes over the bar, he's moving the CoG away from the hips by a lot.

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        • #19
          I doubt there is anything new in the world of LJ landings. Go online and find half-century old videos: Ralph Boston usually followed his feet into the sand, Ter-O often slid in on his right side, and Beamon sprang forward (probably due to his great speed and leg strength). And there was Tuariki, who tried his best to land head first.

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          • #20
            I did go online before making this post. Most jumpers of previous eras, moved forward on way or another after landing, so the spot for measurement was where they feet landed, not where their butt/body fell backwards, as it is with today's jumpers.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Jacksf View Post
              I did go online before making this post. Most jumpers of previous eras, moved forward on way or another after landing, so the spot for measurement was where they feet landed, not where their butt/body fell backwards, as it is with today's jumpers.
              I have been broad/long jumping for 80 years and never heard of this and don't know how it would be possible. When jumper falls back, s/he obliterates the original foot plant.
              The rule is closest mark to the board of any part of body, including hand or hair.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Jacksf View Post
                the spot for measurement was where they feet landed, not where their butt/body fell backwards, as it is with today's jumpers.
                ?
                I think you mistaking the natural entry point for the butt as 'falling back'. I don't see good LJers falling back, but I do see their butt hitting further back than their feet, which only means that they did a good job of keeping their feet up and forward. Btritney Reese used to have a problem landing in a sitting position, which meant her feet mark was what they measured to, but her hips could have gone a lot further, iF It's your foot-mark they measure, you have a problem, cuz the CoG was going to go further. Getting the foot and butt mark coincident is also not a goal. Getting your butt as far as you can is all that matters. Getting your arms and legs in front sets you up for the best butt-mark.

                [too many butts in this explanation!]

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                • #23
                  There are some jumpers who sort of "accordion" their bodies , land on feet, lean forward, sit down on their heels so butt never touches sand, measurement is from foot mark.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Atticus View Post
                    ?
                    I think you mistaking the natural entry point for the butt as 'falling back'. I don't see good LJers falling back, but I do see their butt hitting further back than their feet, which only means that they did a good job of keeping their feet up and forward. Btritney Reese used to have a problem landing in a sitting position, which meant her feet mark was what they measured to, but her hips could have gone a lot further, iF It's your foot-mark they measure, you have a problem, cuz the CoG was going to go further. Getting the foot and butt mark coincident is also not a goal. Getting your butt as far as you can is all that matters. Getting your arms and legs in front sets you up for the best butt-mark.

                    [too many butts in this explanation!]
                    I like your explanation. For years I have watched and admired this event, because it requires a skill I do not have. I may have been under a mistaken impression for decades, but it has seemed to me that an efficient landing had the feet in front of the hips at landing, they form a pivot point to pull the CG forward, and the sitzmark was at or in front of the mark made by the feet (obviously requiring a lot of core strength).

                    If I have been wrong in that (highly possible), what should I be watching to see when a jumper has landed properly to get the most out of a jump?
                    Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants

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