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  • Fourth of July

    This came in e-mail today. Hopefully, it is not considered a copyright material, as I think, it is worthwhile and applicable to a lot wider audience than the Americans.



    Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men
    who signed the Declaration of Independence?

    Five signers were captured by the British as traitors,
    and tortured before they died.

    Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned.
    Two lost their sons serving in the Revolutionary Army;
    another had two sons captured.

    Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or
    hardships of the Revolutionary War.

    They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes,
    and their sacred honor.

    What kind of men were they?

    Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists.
    Eleven were merchants,
    nine were farmers and large plantation owners;
    men of means, well educated,
    but they signed the Declaration of Independence
    knowing full well that the penalty would be death if
    they were captured.
    Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and
    trader, saw his ships swept from the seas by the
    British Navy. He sold his home and properties to
    pay his debts, and died in rags.

    Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British
    that he was forced to move his family almost constantly.
    He served in the Congress without pay, and his family
    was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him,
    and poverty was his reward.

    Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery, Hall, Clymer,
    Walton, Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton.

    At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that
    the British General Cornwallis had taken over the Nelson
    home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General
    George Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed,
    and Nelson died bankrupt.

    Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed.
    The enemy jailed his wife, and she died within a few months.

    John Hart was driven from his wife's bedside as she was dying.
    Their 13 children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill
    were laid to waste. For more than a year he lived in forests
    and caves, returning home to find his wife dead and his
    children vanished.
    So, take a few minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and
    silently thank these patriots. It's not much to ask for the price they paid.

    Remember: freedom is never free!

    I hope you will show your support by sending this to as many
    people as you can, please. It's time we get the word out that patriotism
    is NOT a sin, and the Fourth of July has more to it than beer,
    picnics, and baseball games.
    "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
    by Thomas Henry Huxley

  • #2
    http://www.snopes.com/history/american/pricepaid.asp

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by tandfman
      http://www.snopes.com/history/american/pricepaid.asp
      This one time where Snopes fails. If you read all the way through, you'll see a lot of phrases where it says, 'this is partially true, but'. IF only half is true, it is STILL an astonishing story. These men knew they were committing high treason to the country they lived under - Great Britain. There was zero certainty that the colonies would win the war. Had the British not simply given up, which is essentially what they did, MOST of the signers would have lost a great deal.

      I'm with pego on this. The founding fathers WERE heroes. Sure, much of their motivation was personally financial, but much were also simple 'rights of man' issues.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Marlow
        Originally posted by tandfman
        http://www.snopes.com/history/american/pricepaid.asp
        This one time where Snopes fails. If you read all the way through, you'll see a lot of phrases where it says, 'this is partially true, but'. IF only half is true, it is STILL an astonishing story.
        But the facts are that parts of it are flat out lies and others ignore inconvenient facts that would otherwise make them sound less heroic. No doubt that they all acted heroically in signing the DOI and of course we all owe them a huge debt of gratitude, but whoever wrote this does them all a disservice.

        Comment


        • #5
          It's ironic that this thread would be started on June 19th. I guess when it comes to July 4th, it's all a matter of perspective.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by jazzcyclist
            It's ironic that this thread would be started on June 19th. I guess when it comes to July 4th, it's all a matter of perspective.
            I don't think its irony at all.

            http://mb.trackandfieldnews.com/discuss ... hp?t=35973

            The 4th of July isnt for another two weeks.
            The fool has said...there is no God. Psa 14

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by bad hammy
              Originally posted by Marlow
              Originally posted by tandfman
              http://www.snopes.com/history/american/pricepaid.asp
              This one time where Snopes fails. If you read all the way through, you'll see a lot of phrases where it says, 'this is partially true, but'. IF only half is true, it is STILL an astonishing story.
              But the facts are that parts of it are flat out lies and others ignore inconvenient facts that would otherwise make them sound less heroic. No doubt that they all acted heroically in signing the DOI and of course we all owe them a huge debt of gratitude, but whoever wrote this does them all a disservice.
              The truth is kinda like being pregnant: you is or you ain't.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by gh
                The truth is kinda like being pregnant: you is or you ain't.
                Truth is not only relative, it's many-layered like an onion. And yes, it often makes you cry.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm curious how many are going to spare a few moments from their BBQ's, fireworks, beer drinking and "USA USA USA..." celebrations on July 4th, and consider the last two hundred years plus of Native American history

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by marknhj
                    consider the last two hundred years plus of Native American history
                    Good point. I do, very much, think about all the people who sacrificed their lives to allow us to celebrate this holiday.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Marlow
                      Originally posted by marknhj
                      consider the last two hundred years plus of Native American history
                      Good point. I do, very much, think about all the people who sacrificed their lives to allow us to celebrate this holiday.
                      "Sacrificed" is a very odd and convenient word to use in this context...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by marknhj
                        Originally posted by Marlow
                        Originally posted by marknhj
                        consider the last two hundred years plus of Native American history
                        Good point. I do, very much, think about all the people who sacrificed their lives to allow us to celebrate this holiday.
                        "Sacrificed" is a very odd and convenient word to use in this context...
                        I see your point, but in this context it is used quite often, and appropriately so (IMO). (Not that the NAs didn't 'sacrifice' more).

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by marknhj
                          I'm curious how many are going to spare a few moments from their BBQ's, fireworks, beer drinking and "USA USA USA..." celebrations on July 4th, and consider the last two hundred years plus of Native American history
                          I can tell you sir in one word NONE.

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                          • #14
                            Benjamin Franklin had a son that was a supporter of Britain and he did all he could to help the folks who raise the Union Jack as a flag.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by marknhj
                              I'm curious how many are going to spare a few moments from their BBQ's, fireworks, beer drinking and "USA USA USA..." celebrations on July 4th, and consider the last two hundred years plus of Native American history
                              I think most responders have overlooked the word "Native" in this query.

                              Comment

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