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What do we think of the NBA dress code?

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  • #31
    so you were.... now that I'm getting inculcated into the ways of this new board, unless something is in a white quote box, I tend to think it's from the poster, particulalry if not set off by any kind of quote marks.

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    • #32
      Thanks for the info about the salaries gh! I also mentioned that not all the players (NBA) manage their money well (like getting into debt). But if I confused anyone here, my bad.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by tlb747
        I also mentioned that not all the players (NBA) manage their money well (like getting into debt).
        So what? This means they can't afford to buy a polo shirt and some nice jeans? Any excuses as to why these players ( who make a minimum of $400,000 + per diem during the season) can't afford a few business casual digs deserves to be laughed out of any logical conversation.

        This is not generational, racial, or class-driven, and calling it that is a shot to people who legitimately suffer from those biases. Thousands of young black men from every socioeconomic background accept jobs every day that require them to dress business casual. This is about outsized cases of entitlement, nothing more.

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        • #34
          The essay linked below, by Earl Ofari Hutchinson, "The NBA Dress Code: Its Not About the Dress, Its the Stereotypes," is one of the best comments on the issue I have read so far:

          http://www.blackathletesportsnetwork.ne ... 1201.shtml

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          • #35
            Originally posted by KevinM
            Originally posted by tlb747
            I also mentioned that not all the players (NBA) manage their money well (like getting into debt).
            So what? This means they can't afford to buy a polo shirt and some nice jeans? Any excuses as to why these players ( who make a minimum of $400,000 + per diem during the season) can't afford a few business casual digs deserves to be laughed out of any logical conversation.

            This is not generational, racial, or class-driven, and calling it that is a shot to people who legitimately suffer from those biases. Thousands of young black men from every socioeconomic background accept jobs every day that require them to dress business casual. This is about outsized cases of entitlement, nothing more.

            And in any case, it is their own responsibility to manage their money well. If they can't manage a 400,000+ salary effectively enough to buy some respectable clothing, it's their problem.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by utkvol80
              The essay linked below, by Earl Ofari Hutchinson, "The NBA Dress Code: Its Not About the Dress, Its the Stereotypes," is one of the best comments on the issue I have read so far:

              http://www.blackathletesportsnetwork.ne ... 1201.shtml
              excerpt:
              "Their dress, hip style, brash bravado, and the gangster rap that blare out of the NBA locker rooms and even through the PA systems at games reinforces the old stereotypes that young black males are sullen, defiant, and eternally in rebellion against the established order, and that includes the NBA. That has convinced even more Americans that the thug lifestyle is the black lifestyle."

              It's probably just me, but I have a problem buying that. So because I listen to the Beatles and Stones, I reinforce the old stereotype that we (I) were all drug-addled hippies?

              The NBA types who listen to rap music and wear 'those' clothes are simply following the styles of their sub-culture. If someone sees that as a negative thing, he/she/it needs to examine his/her/its own biases.

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              • #37
                >The NBA types who listen to rap music and wear 'those' clothes are simply following the styles of their sub-culture. If someone sees that as a negative thing, he/she/it needs to examine his/her/its own biases<

                But nut, couldnt you make the same arguement for the girls in your highschool who want to dress like a "hooker"?
                phsstt!

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by tafnut
                  The NBA types who listen to rap music and wear 'those' clothes are simply following the styles of their sub-culture. If someone sees that as a negative thing, he/she/it needs to examine his/her/its own biases.
                  I feel (and probably sound) like a broken record here, but can you really not discern between work clothing and casual wear?

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by tafnut
                    Originally posted by utkvol80
                    The essay linked below, by Earl Ofari Hutchinson, "The NBA Dress Code: Its Not About the Dress, Its the Stereotypes," is one of the best comments on the issue I have read so far:

                    http://www.blackathletesportsnetwork.ne ... 1201.shtml
                    excerpt:
                    "Their dress, hip style, brash bravado, and the gangster rap that blare out of the NBA locker rooms and even through the PA systems at games reinforces the old stereotypes that young black males are sullen, defiant, and eternally in rebellion against the established order, and that includes the NBA. That has convinced even more Americans that the thug lifestyle is the black lifestyle."

                    It's probably just me, but I have a problem buying that. So because I listen to the Beatles and Stones, I reinforce the old stereotype that we (I) were all drug-addled hippies?

                    The NBA types who listen to rap music and wear 'those' clothes are simply following the styles of their sub-culture. If someone sees that as a negative thing, he/she/it needs to examine his/her/its own biases.

                    You're being a bit self-righteous here, Tafnut. You're basically adopting the college anthropology professor view that all other cultures should be judged only by their own standards, and not through the biased lens of our own culture. So by your logic, should I look at militant Islamic clerics in London who preach hatred for America and say it's okay because it's within the bounds of their sub-culture?

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by KevinM
                      Originally posted by tafnut
                      The NBA types who listen to rap music and wear 'those' clothes are simply following the styles of their sub-culture. If someone sees that as a negative thing, he/she/it needs to examine his/her/its own biases.
                      I feel (and probably sound) like a broken record here, but can you really not discern between work clothing and casual wear?
                      NBA work cloths = jersey and baggy shorts and high tops, maybe a headband, or are those out now too?

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                      • #41
                        the nba players are adults who can wear whatever they want 99.9 of the time, including arriving and leaving the stadium.

                        but if are gonna argue that the players should be allowed to dress during the game like a "bum" or a rap or punk star then i think you would also have no problem with, lets say the coach of the lakers, in a tank top and shorts during the game. why does the caoch have to wear a suit and not the players!
                        phsstt!

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by twittering debutante
                          These NBA guys have been pampered their entire lives, at least as long as their basketball prowess became known.

                          None of these guys have ever worked a 9-5 job and none will ever have to.

                          If I were making 3.8 million dollars a year (NBA avg salary) to play 82-100 games and my boss asked me to put away my pimp outfits until the season was over, I'd be down at the Armani store real quick.

                          When you've got professional jackasses like Iverson making 20 million annually say he;d like a clothing stipend, it's easy to realize none of these spoiled crybabies will ever get it.
                          Please make an attempt to get your facts straight before you slander people for things they didn't say. Iverson's responses to the dress code have all followed the line of the old adage "the clothes don't make the man, the man makes the clothes." Marcus Camby and Brevin Knight are the ones suggesting a stipend. Iverson doesn't make 20 million dollars a year. 5.3 million was the league average last season not 3.8 million. If you believe that all players in the NBA have taken that movie script road to get to where they are then you are a fool. You've been watching too many movies like 'Blue Chips.'

                          The "no do-rags" aspect of the dress code could be viewed as racist; do-rags are worn to keep your hair presentable. I have not seen a caucasian athlete in the NBA wearing one yet. Often during a game, athletes with braids have them frazzled due to contact and sweat. To some they look "thuggish" and this is due to their own perception. It is important to know that not everyone can pull back their hair or comb it after they get out of the shower. Do-rags are at times worn by bald people to obtain a certain look but in many cases they are necessary.

                          I respect tafnut for his open mind response and he appears to feel that way due to his present environment, hence, his perception is different and more accepting then others that might not have similar interaction with this new generation that is often referred to as the Hip Hop Generation. I think people forget about the likes of Bill Walton and his unkempt presentation during his era. Walton was often sporting tie die shirts with his wild beard and long wandering hair. Back then, individualism was valued. Let us not forget that individualism is what made a lot of these NBA players who they are today. Individualism can provide an edge. Should it be discouraged?

                          A model citizen and role model for all children is Tim Duncan. He is not considered by manor or style of play to be a part of Hip Hop Generation. Many find the Hip Hop Generation to be negative. Many felt the same way about the 70's. Tim Duncan plays as pure a form of basketball as we have every seen. Duncan openly contested the dress code yet no one has mentioned him. He was quoted as saying:

                          "I think it's a load of crap, I understand what they're trying to do with the hats and do-rags and jerseys and stuff. That's fine. But I don't understand why they would take it to this level. I think it's basically retarded. I don't like the direction they're going, but who am I?"

                          Duncan doesn't sound very "thuggish or pimpish" to me. Duncan likes to dress casual because it is comfortable to him. I think if the league MVP, winner of the Wooden Award and very upstanding role model is against the dress code then we should share his comments.

                          In my opinion, I see the players adhering to the dress code. In time maybe children will say "I want to make it to the NBA so I can dress in nice suits before and after every game." Wait a second though, isn't this possibly sending the wrong message? Isn't this stressing materialism and clothes making the man not man making the clothes? Will children start to focus on the way that they dress more? Won't this lead to other issues for the youth that do not have the means to dress properly? Didn't Iverson say:

                          "It sends a bad message to kids, If you don't have a suit when you go to school, is your teacher going to think you're a bad kid because you don't have a suit on?"

                          Have all of us in this thread asked ourselves:
                          "SHOULD TRACK AND FIELD ATHLETES CONFORM TO THIS SAME DRESS CODE?" The shoe is on the other foot now.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by OwenSamuela15
                            Have all of us in this thread asked ourselves:
                            "SHOULD TRACK AND FIELD ATHLETES CONFORM TO THIS SAME DRESS CODE?" The shoe is on the other foot now.
                            I'd like to assume you are joking here and throughout your post, but I fear you are not.

                            Every time I left campus on the team van or bus when I was in college, I was wearing one of three outfits. If we were travelling directly to the meet (same day, no flight or hotel stay), I (and all of my teammates) would be wearing team-issued warm-ups. If we were driving to the hotel to stay overnight before a meet, I would be wearing a team-issued polo shirt, khakis, and "nice" shoes. If we were flying to a meet, I would have on a coat and tie.

                            I can't tell you how many times we bitched to our coach about this. I also can't tell you how many times strangers in airports, gas stations, etc. would tell my coach or me directly that we looked very respectable and represented ourselves and our university very well. Isn't that the goal here?

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                            • #44
                              >It sends a bad message to kids<

                              the message i see mostly toward kids is do, say and wear whatever you feel like. the truth , which these kids will find out later, is most jobs have a dress code. like i said i worked as a janitor for 8 dollars an hour and i HAD to wear a uniform or quit. maybe this "message" from the nba is not all bad?
                              phsstt!

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by KevinM
                                ...If we were flying to a meet, I would have on a coat and tie. I can't tell you how many times we bitched to our coach about this. I also can't tell you how many times strangers in airports, gas stations, etc. would tell my coach or me directly that we looked very respectable and represented ourselves and our university very well. Isn't that the goal here?
                                I'll never forget getting off the team bus on a college road trip, in our matching school blazers and a LOL asking us, "What choir are you with?" We wuz mortified!

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