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  • bambam1729
    replied
    Originally posted by Tuariki View Post

    In 1974 at Fort Leonard Wood during basic training you weren't asked. You were told to line up, roll up your sleeves, and a medic went down the line with some sort of injection gun.

    They did that 3 or 4 times from memory.

    The closest thing to informed consent was something like this from the drill sergeant

    "line the f**k up, you useless pieces of dog turd. Time for your 2nd vaccination shot".
    They were a little nicer to us, but when I started as an intern at Duke in 1984, we were required to get a series of vaccinations - Hepatitis B, tetanus, and a couple others that I really don't remember. As I recall there were 4 injections. We also had no choice in the matter if we wanted to start that internship and eventually be able to practice medicine.

    Leave a comment:


  • jeremyp
    replied
    Originally posted by bambam1729 View Post

    At least that drill sergeant knew you fairly well, Tuariki
    ROFL

    Leave a comment:


  • bambam1729
    replied
    Originally posted by Tuariki View Post

    In 1974 at Fort Leonard Wood during basic training you weren't asked. You were told to line up, roll up your sleeves, and a medic went down the line with some sort of injection gun.

    They did that 3 or 4 times from memory.

    The closest thing to informed consent was something like this from the drill sergeant

    "line the f**k up, you useless pieces of dog turd. Time for your 2nd vaccination shot".
    At least that drill sergeant knew you fairly well, Tuariki

    Leave a comment:


  • Tuariki
    replied
    Originally posted by 18.99s View Post

    Nothing new or surprising. The military has a decades-long policy of mandatory vaccinations, including some vaccines that civilians don't normally get, like the anthrax vaccine. Can't have military readiness weakened by an outbreak of a preventable disease.
    In 1974 at Fort Leonard Wood during basic training you weren't asked. You were told to line up, roll up your sleeves, and a medic went down the line with some sort of injection gun.

    They did that 3 or 4 times from memory.

    The closest thing to informed consent was something like this from the drill sergeant

    "line the f**k up, you useless pieces of dog turd. Time for your 2nd vaccination shot".

    Leave a comment:


  • jeremyp
    replied
    Mama Mia that's some spicy arm.


    An Italian man who wanted a Covid vaccination certificate without getting the jab turned up for his vaccine with a fake arm, officials say.

    The man, in his 50s, arrived for his shot with a silicone mould covering his real arm, hoping it would go unnoticed.

    But a nurse was not fooled and the man has now been reported to the police.

    The nurse told local media that when she had rolled up his sleeve, she found the skin "rubbery and cold" and the pigment "too light".

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-59524527

    Leave a comment:


  • TN1965
    replied
    Forget horse paste. Anti-vaxxers are now literally eating dirt to stay healthy (dailykos.com)

    What else might people do to prevent COVID-19—aside from taking a free, safe, effective, FDA-approved vaccine? Horse paste was all the rage for a while. Bleach injections never really took off, despite the ocher abomination’s imprimatur. Oh, I know, maybe we can prank them into eating handfuls of dirt!

    Leave a comment:


  • jeremyp
    replied
    Originally posted by 18.99s View Post
    The individual with omicron in Minnesota didn't travel internationally -- they tested positive after returning from New York, which means it's already in New York, or was already circulating among other people in Minnesota. And they got a booster in early November.

    The good news is they only had mild symptoms.
    1 case does not tell us squat. The real issue is how will 65+ folks do with vaccines and boosters. I do not intend to test it.

    Leave a comment:


  • 18.99s
    replied
    The individual with omicron in Minnesota didn't travel internationally -- they tested positive after returning from New York, which means it's already in New York, or was already circulating among other people in Minnesota. And they got a booster in early November.

    The good news is they only had mild symptoms.

    Leave a comment:


  • jeremyp
    replied
    Latest news is that "Natural Immunity" i.e. Had covid but no vaccine, doesnt work with Omicron. Get vaccinated.

    Leave a comment:


  • TN1965
    replied
    Marcus Lamb, founder of Christian network Daystar and vaccine opponent, dies after contracting COVID-19

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/...id/8820884002/

    Marcus Lamb, head of Christian network Daystar who has been a vocal opponent of the coronavirus vaccine, has died of COVID-19, his family announced.

    The conservative Christian Daystar Television Network announced his death Tuesday on Twitter, saying the Network's founder "went home to be with the Lord this morning." His wife, Joni, confirmed on the network his coronavirus diagnoses and that he had "pre-existing conditions" including diabetes. He was 64, she said.

    Leave a comment:


  • TN1965
    replied
    He faked PPP loan applications, got the money, then spent it on a Lamborghini and Rolex. Now he's serving nine years in prison

    https://www.cnn.com/2021/11/30/us/co...rnd/index.html

    A Houston man was sentenced to nine years in prison for using money he got from Covid-19 relief funds to buy cars, a watch and a pay off a home loan, the Justice Department announced.

    Leave a comment:


  • jeremyp
    replied
    Originally posted by 18.99s View Post
    That's just from the small sample size of omicron patients at that one clinic. Time will tell how severe it really is across a broader spectrum of patients worldwide.

    The potential good news is that if omicron is truly and significantly less severe than delta and other widespread variants, and it is much more transmissible, it could become the dominant strain and bring about the end of the pandemic. That doesn't mean it would go away; it may still persist in the population for decades or centuries, but with deaths and hospitalizations at levels similar to the flu (usually under 50K/year deaths in the US), never threatening to overwhelm the hospitals.
    Good point. A nicer, kinder Covid.

    Leave a comment:


  • 18.99s
    replied
    That's just from the small sample size of omicron patients at that one clinic. Time will tell how severe it really is across a broader spectrum of patients worldwide.

    The potential good news is that if omicron is truly and significantly less severe than delta and other widespread variants, and it is much more transmissible, it could become the dominant strain and bring about the end of the pandemic. That doesn't mean it would go away; it may still persist in the population for decades or centuries, but with deaths and hospitalizations at levels similar to the flu (usually under 50K/year deaths in the US), never threatening to overwhelm the hospitals.
    Last edited by 18.99s; 11-29-2021, 08:40 AM.

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  • jeremyp
    replied
    JOHANNESBURG, Nov 28 (Reuters) - A South African doctor who was one of the first to suspect a different coronavirus strain among patients said on Sunday that symptoms of the Omicron variant were so far mild and could be treated at home.

    Dr. Angelique Coetzee, a private practitioner and chair of South African Medical Association, told Reuters that on Nov. 18 she noticed seven patients at her clinic who had symptoms different from the dominant Delta variant, albeit "very mild".

    Now designated Omicron by the World Health Organization, the variant was detected and announced by South Africa's National Institute of Communicable Diseases (NICD) on Nov. 25 from samples taken from a laboratory from Nov. 14 to Nov. 16.

    Coetzee said a patient on Nov. 18 reported at her clinic being "extremely fatigued" for two days with body aches and headache.

    "Symptoms at that stage was very much related to normal viral infection. And because we haven't seen COVID-19 for the past eight to 10 weeks, we decided to test," she said, adding that the patient and his family turned out to be positive.

    On the same day, more patients came in with similar symptoms, which was when she realised there was "something else going on." Since then, she's seen two to three patients "We have seen a lot of Delta patients during the third wave. And this doesn't fit in the clinical picture," she said, adding she alerted NICD on the same day with the clinical results.

    "Most of them are seeing very, very mild symptoms and none of them so far have admitted patients to surgeries. We have been able to treat these patients conservatively at home," she said.

    Coetzee, who is also on the Ministerial Advisory Committee on Vaccines, said unlike the Delta so far patients have not reported loss of smell or taste and there has been no major drop in oxygen levels with the new variant.

    Her experience so far has been that the variant is affecting people who are 40 or younger. Almost half of the patients with Omicron symptoms that she treated were not vaccinated.

    "The most predominant clinical complaint is severe fatigue for one or two days. With them, the headache and the body aches and pain."

    https://www.reuters.com/world/africa...ms-2021-11-28/

    Let's hope she's right. We still don't know how it will affect the elderly vaccinated.

    Leave a comment:


  • jeremyp
    replied
    Meanwhile in Leipzig Germany


    "We are certain that the fourth wave is going to be a nightmare,” says Sylvia Köppen, head nurse at the Interdisciplinary Surgical Intensive Care Unit (IOI).
    "It’s going to be a catastrophe," says Andreas Knauth, a nurse specialized in intensive care and anesthesiology.
    "It just going to be terrible," says Anke Schrötter, also a specialist, who has been working in health care for 18 years.
    DER SPIEGEL spent three days with her and her colleagues in a station that has already reached its limits. It is a place where the fear of what lies ahead in the coming months is at least as great as their incomprehension for a society that is simply carrying on as if the coronavirus were history.

    "One thing we have learned is that COVID is an asshole," says Knauth, just beginning his third early shift in a row. He has two more ahead of him. The rings under his eyes tell you all you need to know about his work schedule: four late shifts, then a day off, five early shifts, two late, two early. And any time he doesn’t have off is full of stress. "You can have the perfect patient for seven hours, with all the values stable and everything going well. And then COVID will just rip him away."
    https://www.spiegel.de/international...f-60a6442b1235
    Last edited by jeremyp; 11-28-2021, 07:04 PM.

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