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  • Originally posted by J Rorick View Post
    Maybe it just means "obviously".
    It's not an actual phrase that I've heard myself before. I suppose it is just crystal clear that they are drunk.

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    • Originally posted by tandfman View Post

      I don't think I've ever seen or heard of anyone getting drunk on vermouth. It's got less than half the alcohol content of gin. It's also not something I can imagine drinking straight.
      <<If you prefer your martinis extra dry, then the idea of sipping vermouth on the rocks might sound a little off, like drinking ketchup from the bottle just because you pour it on your fries. But straight, on the rocks, or with a splash of soda is how most vermouth-producing countries — France, Italy, and Spain — drink the stuff. In fact, there are bars entirely devoted to it. Which is no surprise: Vermouth is wine after all, wine that’s been flavored with bitter herbs and spices, slightly sweetened, and fortified with a high-proof spirit. Mixing it with liquor is an American phenomenon.>>

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      • Good French vermouth is a fine aperitif..I've had it....reminds me of a fino sherry..

        but it is only about 15% alcohol....that is why if you use it sparingly you have to keep it in the refrigerator. After 6 months it turns to vinegar.

        The dry martini is an American thing. Not a Brit thing.

        The Ideal Aperitif: Good Vermouth, Cool and Fragrant

        https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/18/d...-aperitif.html
        Last edited by Conor Dary; 07-06-2020, 06:12 PM.

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        • James Bond was American??

          After meeting his CIA contact Felix Leiter for the first time, Bond orders a drink from a barman while at the casino. 'A dry martini,' he said. 'One. In a deep champagne goblet.'

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          • I figured someone would bring up the James Bond connection...nice try!..the most famous saying..but Fleming wasn't living in Britain when he wrote his Bond novels but in Jamaica...

            The martini is not a British thing. It's gin and tonic...

            Just a guess but ice is not part of the British scene. And you can't make a proper cocktail without ice cubes.
            Last edited by Conor Dary; 07-06-2020, 07:06 PM.

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            • So Fleming was Jamaican? And if so wouldn't Bond be drinking rum drinks??

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              • He wasn't Jamaican....he was as British as they come...

                Fleming came from a wealthy family connected to the merchant bank Robert Fleming & Co., and his father was the Member of Parliament for Henley from 1910 until his death on the Western Front in 1917. Educated at Eton, Sandhurst and, briefly, the universities of Munich and Geneva, Fleming moved through several jobs before he started writing.

                I have no idea why he picked that drink...my point is it isn't a British thing. It's a novel about a worldly spy...rum sounds rather plebeian. Also it's vodka....

                Ice is American....scotch on the rocks is definitely a no no in Britain...
                Last edited by Conor Dary; 07-06-2020, 07:31 PM.

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                • Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
                  Good French vermouth is a fine aperitif..I've had it....reminds me of a fino sherry..

                  but it is only about 15% alcohol....that is why if you use it sparingly you have to keep it in the refrigerator. After 6 months it turns to vinegar.
                  I learned that only recently, went out and bought a bottle of dry and a bottle of sweet and put them right in the fridge. That was about a month ago and I haven't opened either bottle. We use them almost exclusively as components of cocktails and neither I nor Mrs. tandfman drink martinis very much. I drink gin and in warm weather I enjoy a gin and tonic. Mrs. t prefers vodka and tonic or sometimes a vodka gimlet. When I drink vodka, I like it on the rocks. A couple of times a year, maybe, I'll drink a martini.

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                  • Originally posted by Trickstat View Post

                    It's not an actual phrase that I've heard myself before. I suppose it is just crystal clear that they are drunk.
                    We can have the court reporter read back what they said ...

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                    • I've never had a problem with Vermouth going bad if not refrigerated.

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                      • Nor have I, but I've never drunk enough of it to notice. I never drink it straight and I put very little in martinis--the taste of the vermouth is overwhelmed by the taste of the gin, as it should be.

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                        • Originally posted by gh View Post
                          I've never had a problem with Vermouth going bad if not refrigerated.
                          I did....my Martinis were tasting odd....I couldn't figure out what was wrong....then one day shortly after the Times had an article on vermouths... and noted that they had to be kept refrigerated....

                          Sure enough I tasted the vermouth and it had turned vinegary...bought a new bottle and all was well.

                          A vermouth you would use in a martini, like the dry Dolin Vermouth de Chambéry ($10, 375 milliliters), also makes a pretty good aperitif: light, floral and herbal with a citrus edge.

                          No matter what sort of vermouth you want to drink, do not allow it to gather dust on the bar once you’ve opened it. Put it in the refrigerator, where a good vermouth will last and evolve for months.

                          “Anything that is made of less than 25 percent alcohol should go in your refrigerator once it’s opened,” Ms. Miraglia of Uncouth Vermouth said. “But even if you don’t refrigerate, they won’t go bad. They’ll just turn into the most gorgeous cooking vinegars ever.”


                          Sweet or dry and infused with herbs, spices and botanicals, this often misunderstood fortified wine whets the appetite.


                          Last edited by Conor Dary; 07-06-2020, 09:07 PM.

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                          • Meanwhile....

                            Brilliant messaging. Social proof - demonstration that people like you do the thing we are trying to get you to do - among the most effective approaches to shape behavior. Also, more effective to cue - not mandate - action you want people to adopt.



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                            • Getting back to vermouth (hey, why not?) I just saw this article. Headline - 7 Unexpected Ways to Use Vermouth in Cocktails

                              https://vinepair.com/articles/7-unex...ktail-recipes/

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                              • meanwhile, in Britain...

                                Workers who have regular Covid-19 tests could face huge tax bill


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