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Tokyo Olympics ... [no foreign fans] [no fans period]

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  • Originally posted by 18.99s View Post

    That implies you also need a phone with a SIM card that works in Japan, with a US-based data plan that will allow roaming in Japan without bankrupting you, or you have to sign up for a plan with a Japan-based carrier.

    Are they providing information on how to obtain that to every athlete, coach, and support staff in the world who will be in Tokyo? Or will there be wifi coverage for all the areas within the bubble?
    They're providing everything in terms of support. Its been amazing the amount of work and detail they are going thru to get TeamUSA to Tokyo, and all the support staff. They provide us USOPC cell phones for the duration of our stay there.

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    • One other thing I forgot to add - we cannot take public transportation in Tokyo as a foreign visitor. We have to only use Games provided transport throughout. The USOPC also will have their own fleet of vehicles to help us with that, which also qualify.

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      • Originally posted by Trickstat View Post

        I knew someone, sadly now deceased, who was in Atlanta in 1996 and was rather proud of having smuggled a can of Pepsi into the stadium.
        As I recall, there were free Coke dispensing machines throughout the stadium.

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        • British medical journal calls for global conversation about Olympics

          A British medical journal has called for a "global conversation" about what to do with the Tokyo Olympics set to open next month amid the coronavirus pandemic, while criticizing global health organizations for being largely silent on the topic.

          In an editorial dated Saturday, The Lancet said the silence by the World Health Organization and other major health bodies such as the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is a "deflection of responsibility" as the Olympics and the Paralympics could lead to spreading the virus in Japan and other countries.

          With about 40 days until the opening of the Olympics, Tokyo remains under a state of emergency to bring down the number of infections. Health care experts in Japan have expressed concerns about going ahead with the games, while opinion polls show that public opposition to the games is high.


          https://english.kyodonews.net/news/2...-olympics.html

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          • Japan averaging almost a million vaccine doses a day over the last seven days per ourworldindata.

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            • How the Olympics will navigate COVID-19 (yahoo.com)

              The International Olympic Committee and Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee on Tuesday revealed the third and final version of "playbooks" that outline countermeasures and rules that athletes and other Olympic participants must follow while in Japan.

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              • Originally posted by donley2 View Post
                Japan averaging almost a million vaccine doses a day over the last seven days per ourworldindata.
                Swell they are only 3+ months behind the US..... and they don't have a domestic source...meanwhile the Olympics are supposed to start in 5 weeks...


                Last edited by Conor Dary; 06-15-2021, 07:06 PM.

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                • Originally posted by TN1965 View Post
                  How the Olympics will navigate COVID-19 (yahoo.com)

                  The International Olympic Committee and Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee on Tuesday revealed the third and final version of "playbooks" that outline countermeasures and rules that athletes and other Olympic participants must follow while in Japan.
                  An IOC report....completely believable....

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                  • Meanwhile....in the Financial Times...

                    Olympics will need bailout if games go ahead without spectators



                    ROBIN HARDING AND LEO LEWIS TOKYO

                    The Tokyo Olympics will need a public bailout of about $800m if the games are held behind closed doors as organisers delay a decision on domestic spectators to the last possible moment.

                    Recent budgets show the Tokyo 2020 organisers are still assuming full stadiums. Having already spent the billions of yen raised from ticket sales, a new subsidy from taxpayers would be the only way to finance refunds, according to a Financial Times analysis of organising committee accounts.

                    With Japan’s government determined to press ahead and hold the games from July 23, the decision to allow fans into the stadiums has become one of the biggest controversies around the Olympics.

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                    • Financial Times...

                      Sponsors’ hopes of Olympic-size marketing gains put to the torch

                      Kana Inagaki

                      In 1964, the Tokyo Olympics was watched via the first worldwide satellite broadcast through a gigantic antenna developed by NEC.
                      In the Olympics starting in late July, NEC will again be deploying new technology. Its facial-recognition system will be installed at Olympic stadiums to identify athletes and staff, as the government pushes ahead with what it has promised will be a “safe and secure” games despite the pandemic.

                      However, there will probably be little promotion by NEC or by any of the other Olympic sponsors of tech used in the games this summer, whether it be related to Toyota’s self-driving vehicles or to security robots developed by Secom.

                      As one sponsor has grimly acknowledged, silence is the best marketing strategy to navigate a toxic environment where any association with the games could be damaging to the corporate brand.

                      Another chief executive quietly retracted a comment he made to the Financial Times a few months ago that he loved sport and wanted the Olympics to go ahead, saying that what would have been a harmless comment in any other context was inappropriate in the light of lingering public opposition to the games.

                      In a further sign of how hazardous the situation is, NEC was unexpectedly drawn into a scandal that is revealing of how much the Olympics have raised the stakes for both the Japanese government and businesses.

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                      • But even if they manage to navigate the games in Tokyo safely, a minefield lies ahead for Olympics sponsors such as Toyota and Panasonic with the 2022 Beijing winter Olympics. Companies are likely to come under activist pressure to take a stance against China’s human rights abuses in Xinjiang.

                        For too long, Japanese companies have considered sport simply as something they need to support. A greater sophistication is called for as Olympics sponsorship becomes even more political and contentious.

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                        • Japanese fans to be allowed in Tokyo, up to 10,000 per venue and 50% capacity. Masks will be required, but no mention of vaccination requirements.

                          https://www.cbssports.com/olympics/n...utdoor-events/

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                          • Tokyo shapes up to be No-Fun Olympics with many rules, tests

                            The Tokyo Olympics, already delayed by the pandemic, are not looking like much fun: Not for athletes. Not for fans. And not for the Japanese public. They are caught between concerns about the coronavirus at a time when few are vaccinated on one side and politicians who hope to save face by holding the games and the International Olympic Committee with billions of dollars on the line on the other.

                            Japan is famous for running on consensus. But the decision to proceed with the Olympics — and this week to permit some fans, if only locals — has shredded it.

                            “We have been cornered into a situation where we cannot even stop now. We are damned if we do, and damned if we do not,” Kaori Yamaguchi, a member of the Japanese Olympic Committee and a bronze medalist in judo in 1988, wrote in a recent editorial published by the Kyodo news agency. “The IOC also seems to think that public opinion in Japan is not important.”

                            https://apnews.com/article/tokyo-202...dde7f8ec9c8429

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                            • Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
                              Tokyo shapes up to be No-Fun Olympics with many rules, tests
                              Probably because some people have been so insistent that they not happen at all.
                              They are taking all the necessary precautions. No need to apologize for that.

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                              • A Month Before the Olympics, How Is Japan Faring With Covid?


                                By Lauren LeatherbyJune 23, 2021


                                With a month to go until the Tokyo Olympics and a state of emergency freshly lifted in most of the country, Japan is seeing relatively low coronavirus case counts after a surge last month. But the country’s low vaccination rate, especially compared with other rich countries, and variants on the rise there have prompted some public health experts in recent weeks to express concerns about the Games or call for them to be canceled.

                                As athletes and coaches from almost every country in the world prepare to descend on Japan, where tens of thousands of residents will work at or attend the Games, just 7 percent of the country’s residents are fully vaccinated, compared with around a quarter of the population or more in most other rich countries. About 18 percent have received at least one shot, ranking Japan’s vaccination rate among the lowest of its peers and leaving the population vulnerable at a time when the Delta variant is on the rise and predicted to become dominant.

                                https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/...-olympics.html

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