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  • non-sexual abuse of young athletes

    Gymnasts Worldwide Push Back on Their Sport’s Culture of Abuse
    On Instagram and other social networks, gymnasts have tagged posts with #GymnastAlliance to share their own experiences in the wake of a new documentary that highlights verbal and physical abuse by coaches.


    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/08/03/s...64ec6c6db2007c

  • #2
    The US is not the only country with problems of coaches abusing young athletes.

    Headline - Human Rights Watch report documents abuse of child athletes in Olympic host nation

    Lede paragraphs -

    Japanese child athletes are routinely subjected to physical, sexual and verbal abuse from their coaches, according to a new report from Human Rights Watch.

    The report, entitled "I Was Hit So Many Times I Can't Count: Abuse of Child Athletes in Japan", and released in the week the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games had been due to begin, documents how some athletes committed suicide after suffering abuse.

    Depression, physical disabilities and lifelong trauma were also uncovered in the report, which includes testimony from athletes competing in more than 50 sports.
    https://www.insidethegames.biz/artic...abuse-olympics




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    • #3
      Originally posted by tandfman View Post
      The US is not the only country with problems of coaches abusing young athletes.

      Headline - Human Rights Watch report documents abuse of child athletes in Olympic host nation

      Lede paragraphs -



      https://www.insidethegames.biz/artic...abuse-olympics



      I’d be interested in knowing the stories from the eastern block countries from the 50s to the 90s.

      Comment


      • #4
        As far as Japan goes, nothing new here. I can't be the only one who remembers the documentary on their 1964 gold medal volleyball team. It is included in this article (part 2 of 5):

        https://theolympians.co/2017/07/11/j...or-tough-love/
        Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Master403 View Post
          As far as Japan goes, nothing new here. I can't be the only one who remembers the documentary on their 1964 gold medal volleyball team. It is included in this article (part 2 of 5):

          https://theolympians.co/2017/07/11/j...or-tough-love/
          i remember watching that when I was a kid and being in awe of how hard they were willing (aka in retrospect, "willing") to work. I would have happily emulated them.

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          • #6
            Australian gymnastics doesn't want to be left out:

            https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/spo...22-p55ehx.html

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Dave View Post

              I’d be interested in knowing the stories from the eastern block countries from the 50s to the 90s.
              Abuse is still common today in many sports. Some Russian gymnasts are coming forward, and Svetlana Khorkina (the Isinbayeva of gymnastics) has accused them all of making it up for attention. The same accusations were made toward Olga Korbut when she came forward as having been abused.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by polevaultpower View Post

                Abuse is still common today in many sports. Some Russian gymnasts are coming forward, and Svetlana Khorkina (the Isinbayeva of gymnastics) has accused them all of making it up for attention. The same accusations were made toward Olga Korbut when she came forward as having been abused.
                “the Isinbayeva of gymnastics”. Is your implication that she is really dominant or that she is closely linked to the regime?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Master403 View Post
                  As far as Japan goes, nothing new here. I can't be the only one who remembers the documentary on their 1964 gold medal volleyball team. It is included in this article (part 2 of 5):

                  https://theolympians.co/2017/07/11/j...or-tough-love/
                  So, where is the line between tough and abusive lie? Obviously sexual abuse is not up for debate.

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                  • #10
                    Khorkina wasn't as dominant (she was an all-time great as compared to Isi's GOAT). She is likely the best Russian female gymnast of this millenium. She seems to be the gymnastics link to the regime that Isi is for athletics.
                    Last edited by J Rorick; 07-30-2020, 05:22 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Dave View Post

                      So, where is the line between tough and abusive lie? Obviously sexual abuse is not up for debate.
                      As gh noted, the thread has wandered. Sorry to have contributed to that. There was no suggestion of sexual abuse.

                      Yours is a good question, and was the point of the documentary. I'm not sure there is a clear line. Some of it depends on the subjects of the toughness/abuse and their ability to change coaches or programs. It's easy in T&F, much more difficult in gymnastics. The volleyball women all worked at the same company.

                      Similar discussions have occurred with military programs. Again, no clear division. Extreme cases are easy to identify, but others are debatable. The article and documentary I referenced could be viewed as toughness or abuse. That was true 50 years ago, and remains so today.
                      Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants

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                      • #12
                        this is a new thread composed of material that wandered off-topic in the Nassar thread, except the OP that starts it is brand new.

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                        • #13
                          non-sexual abuse of young athletes
                          Psychological abuse of young athletes is as pandemic as Covid. I have been primarily involved with HS T&F and club/HS soccer. Generally speaking, boys brush it off better, but girls can be very susceptible to it. I have witnessed MANY cases that I've had to get involved with. I have brought action against coaches in both sports. I even had a referee removed in mid-season.

                          It will continue, primarily because of runaway egos of many coaches.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Master403 View Post
                            As far as Japan goes, nothing new here. I can't be the only one who remembers the documentary on their 1964 gold medal volleyball team. It is included in this article (part 2 of 5):

                            https://theolympians.co/2017/07/11/j...or-tough-love/
                            I am not a fan of Daimatsu or his method, but what he did is different from what's reported by Human Rights Watch.
                            He never hit or kicked his players. He used some harsh language, but I don't think it was verbal abuse. Players often talked back.

                            A few other points to note. All the players were adults. They voluntarily joined the team. They could have left for other teams, although that probably would have meant losing their spots on the national team. (The gold medal team had two players from other clubs, but they were never part of his club.) Most importantly. practice sessions were open to public, and anyone could see what was going on.

                            Would today's players tolerate that? Probably not. But that wouldn't make it abuse.




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                            • #15
                              Verbal aggression and intimidation would definitely qualify as abusive, certainly by today's standards. They can produce very high performing athletes, but the long term prognosis is not always worth it. You can squeeze higher performance from a young athlete, but from what I have seen (limited sample size, to be sure) those who truly love their sport will be more likely to succeed.

                              I have witnessed baseball parents who were harsh on their children for not living up to their potential, leave the sport gladly. I have seen three young men in their early teens who would sooner play a few innings than eat, two of whom are still in the major leagues a decade later (with one holding a few MLB pitching records) and another who retired after 9 lucrative years.

                              I understand the compunction of national team/level coaches to pressure their athletes to overachieve, as their jobs may depend on it. But IMHO, the juice is simply not worth the squeeze.

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