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  • Running and Aging

    This is not a happy graph!

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/E0qG887X...pg&name=medium

    The good news is that 35 is still good.
    The bad news is that 40 is already bad.

  • #2
    As I interpret the graph, seniors retain a higher percentage of proficiency in the sprints than in longer distances. Can someone figure out how 9.6y at age 20 compares to 11.0m at age 40?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by lonewolf View Post
      As I interpret the graph, seniors retain a higher percentage of proficiency in the sprints than in longer distances. Can someone figure out how 9.6y at age 20 compares to 11.0m at age 40?
      There are age-graded tables.

      http://www.mastersathletics.net/index.php?id=2595

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      • #4
        Originally posted by lonewolf View Post
        As I interpret the graph, seniors retain a higher percentage of proficiency in the sprints than in longer distances.
        Partly, I would assume, because it's easier for some of us folks to get 100m down the track than a mile.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Atticus View Post
          Thanks, Atticus. I plugged in the numbers but do not understand the meaning of the percentages. I guess my physical resilience has outpaced my mental acuity.

          100 m, Age 20, Time 10.6, Factor 98.99, Age Grade 10.49, Open Std 9.79, Age Std. 9.89, Age Perform 93.24
          100 m, Age 40, Time 11.00, Factor 99.45, Age Grade 10.50, Open Std 9.79, Age Std. 10.26, Age Perform 93.24

          BJ, Age 20, 7.77m, Factor 1.1113, Age Grade 7.86, Open Std. 8.95, Age Std. 8.85, Age Perform 87.8
          LJ, Age 40, 7.11m, Factor 1.1112, Age Grade 7.79, Open Std 8.95, Age Std. 8.05, Age Perform 88.28

          Did I slow down? speed up? stagnate?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by bad hammy View Post
            Partly, I would assume, because it's easier for some of us folks to get 100m down the track than a mile.
            Ok, I ran the numbers for the mile. This interesting and will be more so when I figure out what it means.

            Mile (1951) Age 20, 4:13,Factor 0.9893, Age Grade 4:10.3, Open Std 3:42.0, Age Std 3:45.0, Age Perform 78.94
            Mile (1971) Age 44, 4:58, Factor 0.9161, Age Grade 4:24.1, Open Std, 3:42.6, Age Std 4:02.68 Age Perform 84.3

            I was never a distance runner. The age 20 race was a one-off experiment in college following our 4:10 Scandinavian milers. The age 40 race was on a dare/challenge paced by my 17-year-old son, a 4:10 miler at the time.
            Age correction: 44 not 40
            Last edited by lonewolf; 05-06-2021, 10:48 PM.

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            • #7
              Good Lord! Performance REALLY falls off the map after 80 LOL. I guess I have a few decades left before that happens. I was a 400-800 m man in high school (avg. at best) and would be lucky to crack a 7-minute mile today.

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              • #8
                My doc sent me to a Physical Therapist for my shoulder. Small world, turned out to be same therapists I had for rehab after knee replacement/implant in 2008. She found the sore spot and explained more about my shoulder than two doctors. Says she can help with my shoulder and balance and will have me ready to run a 90 second 440y on Aug 4.
                I have run my age, or better, for 440 yards on every birthday since age 51, running 84 seconds on 88th. I was too wobbly to risk last year on 89th.

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                • #9
                  World Masters Athletics lists the World Record for the M90 age group as 1:29.15, by Canada's renowned Earl Fee. It sounds as if you could challenge or better that!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by lonewolf View Post
                    My doc sent me to a Physical Therapist for my shoulder. Small world, turned out to be same therapists I had for rehab after knee replacement/implant in 2008. She found the sore spot and explained more about my shoulder than two doctors. Says she can help with my shoulder and balance and will have me ready to run a 90 second 440y on Aug 4.
                    I have run my age, or better, for 440 yards on every birthday since age 51, running 84 seconds on 88th. I was too wobbly to risk last year on 89th.
                    Wow! That says a lot about your commitment and the benefits of simply refusing to give up. Well done.

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                    • #11
                      Of all the amazing things lonewolf has shared with us here about his life, I have always found his "run your age" 400/440 thing to be the most impressive.

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                      • #12
                        Came home from my second physical therapy session all inspired, ran an experimental 140 yards on grass in 28 seconds. Heavy going in grass. Walked 200 yards, risked running on a concrete path at the threshold of my confidence of remaining vertical, figuring I would launch onto the grass if I fell. Did not fall, Ran 220 yards in 38 seconds. Need 2 x 45 second 220s for 90 second 440. It was not exhausting but also not pretty. Feels like I am plodding/lumbering, and my feet weigh 50 pounds each. I could actually run faster (if I don't fall) but I am going to have to do some conditioning before August 4th.
                        I don't know how my therapist is going to improve my balance as promised but she forced me to turn a bicycle crank today for the first time since my knee replacement in 2008. I think the object of physical therapy is to hurt you so badly that when they turn you loose, you think you are cured.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by wamego relays champ View Post
                          Of all the amazing things lonewolf has shared with us here about his life, I have always found his "run your age" 400/440 thing to be the most impressive.
                          I'm impressed with his 7.77m (25-6) LJ combined with a 4:13 mile. Not too many folks could exceed both of those marks; maybe a few decathletes who are excellent middle distance runners. Curtis Beach, an 8000+ point guy, has done 7.88 and a 3:59 1500m. He's also run a 1:47xx 800 in an open race, so he could have run 4:13. But Lonewolf did it back in the 1950s!

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                          • #14
                            I don't have a later age performance to compare but out of curiosity, I ran my age 20 880y, (51-60) 1:51.0, another one-off experiment. The most painful, never again repeated experienced of my running life.

                            880y,(1952), Age 20, 1:51.0, Factor 0.9925, Age Grade 1:50.2, Open Std 1:41.1, Age Std 141.9, Age Perform 91.78


                            But I still don't know what the numbers mean?? Anyone??


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                            • #15
                              The Age Factor (0.9925) basically means you, at age 20, should be at about 99.25% as good as at your theoretical peak (supposedly a couple of years older). The Age Grade (1:50.2) is what the tables suggest you would have run at that peak. The Age Performance (91.78), is the World Record, or hypothetical World Record (1:41.1, at the time these tables were developed) divided by your time.

                              From an earlier post, your 4:58 mile at age 44 is equivalent to a 4:24.3 by someone in his prime.
                              Your 7.11m long jump at age 40 is the equivalent of a 7.79m by someone in his prime (almost as good as you did when you were young. In other words, you had lost very little).

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