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Naomi Osaka and Mental Health Reform

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  • NotDutra5
    replied
    Originally posted by Atticus View Post
    But my point is - it should NOT be. No mental health professional is OK with this status quo, so why should we be? This is not a 'suck it up, snowflake' situation.
    If it shouldn't be then she should (have) negotiated the contract as such.

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  • NotDutra5
    replied
    Originally posted by Trickstat View Post

    I suspect when Billie Jean fought for greater coverage she was thinking more of actual matches than press conferences.
    I suspect that when Billie Jean was fighting, she recognized the value of the press conferences.

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  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    Originally posted by jc203 View Post
    Simple: Osaka chose not to play and not to be paid. She joins a long list of tennis hall of famers who abandoned the existing structures because they were unhappy with then-current restrictions or demands: Kramer, Gonzales, Segura, Laver, Billie Jean, et al. They were all heavily criticized for pursuing their own best interests.
    Not just tennis players but athletes in all sports have been willing to pay fines in order to make a point. She's not unique on this point. Hell, look at Serena Williams and John McEnroe. However, other athletes took the hit and kept on truckin'. The fact that Osaka isn't willing to keep on truckin' is what makes her unique.

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  • jc203
    replied
    Simple: Osaka chose not to play and not to be paid. She joins a long list of tennis hall of famers who abandoned the existing structures because they were unhappy with then-current restrictions or demands: Kramer, Gonzales, Segura, Laver, Billie Jean, et al. They were all heavily criticized for pursuing their own best interests.

    Leave a comment:


  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    Originally posted by 18.99s View Post
    A $15,000 penalty isn't an unfair consequence; it's less than 0.1% of her annual earnings. I wish I could skip doing parts of my job and only get a 0.1% reduction in salary.
    There are inane, repetitive, computer-based training modules that everyone at my job has to do that I doubt anyone would do if you could pay 0.1% of you salary to get out of them.

    Leave a comment:


  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    Originally posted by Trickstat View Post

    I suspect when Billie Jean fought for greater coverage she was thinking more of actual matches than press conferences.
    King was fighting for better/equal pay which comes partly from increased media coverage. No one was preventing from playing tournaments in empty arenas with no TV.

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  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    Originally posted by CookyMonzta View Post

    Bad comparison. The Super Bowl is a championship game. Naomi pulled out after the first round of the French Open. Comparing a championship to a playoff round is like comparing a Lamborghini to a Yugo.
    The fact that it was the first round and not the final is besides my point. She didn't get fined for withdrawing, she got fined for refusing to due the post-match press conference, a contractual obligation to the French Open and WTA. I'll bet there would have been no backlash had she withdrew from the final but still did all her press conferences. After all, athletes withdraw from matches all the time for injuries without controversy. It seems that Osaka would have been perfectly fine to play all 7 matches and win the tournament as long as she didn't have to do the part of the job she doesn't like. And as bambam pointed out, she had no problems continuing to do the interviews with Japanese media that she was paid extra for.

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  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by 18.99s View Post
    If ordinary people can't or won't do part of their job because of a mental or physical health problem, they'll expect to collect less pay, or use up some of their vacation time to recover, or get suspended or demoted or fired.
    Why should celebrities with an 8-figure income be exempt from such consequences? It's not like they're imposing a 1-year ban on her or anything of that magnitude.
    The Americans with Disabilities Act protects bodily impaired people, but because we can't see mental issues, we toss it off as less important, when it's actually just as important, if not more so.
    People with physical and mental issues go into jobs with their eyes open, know what is expected of them, but that doesn't mean we should put them in harm's way. A tennis player should be expected to play tennis. If they have problems with contentious press, they should be able to find alternate methods, like written questions and answers. Everyone realizes that press relations are an important part of pro sports, but not at the expense of athletes with problems so bad that it forces them to stop playing.
    I will be very disappointed (but not surprised) if this incident doesn't spark some changes in how we treat (at least) athletes suffering from clinical depression and anxiety (which has crossed far over the line from the helplessness/apathy and/or anxiety we all experience).

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  • 18.99s
    replied
    Originally posted by deroki View Post

    I don't think this is correct. Ms Osaka did an on-court interview after her first match. My understanding is that she was refusing to do press conferences. Is it the case that journalists at press conferences, and the media firms that they represent (largely the print media) pay for a place. My understanding is that Newspaper A applies for a press pass and the tournament chooses who and how many press passes they offer and little or no money is involved.
    If the newspapers and other media companies get free access to press conferences with athletes, and the tournament organizers require the athletes to participate in order to get fully paid, that must mean those conferences are thought to be important for promoting the tournament and improving the organizer's bottom line. In which case the athletes' obligation would be to the organizers who pay them to play.

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  • deroki
    replied
    Originally posted by 18.99s View Post

    It's part of the job and in her contract. The media wouldn't pay the tournament organizers so much if they couldn't get access to interview the athletes, and consequently the athletes would be paid less.
    I don't think this is correct. Ms Osaka did an on-court interview after her first match. My understanding is that she was refusing to do press conferences. Is it the case that journalists at press conferences, and the media firms that they represent (largely the print media) pay for a place. My understanding is that Newspaper A applies for a press pass and the tournament chooses who and how many press passes they offer and little or no money is involved. The on-court interview would meet obligation to those who were paying significantly towards the tournament - the tournament sponsors and the TV broadcasters.

    Leave a comment:


  • 18.99s
    replied
    Originally posted by Atticus View Post
    But my point is - it should NOT be. No mental health professional is OK with this status quo, so why should we be? This is not a 'suck it up, snowflake' situation.
    If ordinary people can't or won't do part of their job because of a mental or physical health problem, they'll expect to collect less pay, or use up some of their vacation time to recover, or get suspended or demoted or fired.

    Why should celebrities with an 8-figure income be exempt from such consequences? It's not like they're imposing a 1-year ban on her or anything of that magnitude.

    Leave a comment:


  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by 18.99s View Post
    It's part of the job and in her contract.
    But my point is - it should NOT be. No mental health professional is OK with this status quo, so why should we be? This is not a 'suck it up, snowflake' situation.

    Leave a comment:


  • 18.99s
    replied
    Originally posted by Atticus View Post
    If an athlete/celebrity/anyone doesn't want to be interviewed by the press, that's their RIGHT [freedom of non-speech, as it were]. Get rid of the fines now, and then deal with the rules that exacerbate mental health issues.
    It's part of the job and in her contract. The media wouldn't pay the tournament organizers so much if they couldn't get access to interview the athletes, and consequently the athletes would be paid less.

    She has the right to decline to speak to the press, just like I have the right to decline to speak to my employer's distributors and suppliers. But then my employer has the right to dock my pay or fire me for that.

    A $15,000 penalty isn't an unfair consequence; it's less than 0.1% of her annual earnings. I wish I could skip doing parts of my job and only get a 0.1% reduction in salary.

    Leave a comment:


  • Trickstat
    replied
    Originally posted by jazzcyclist View Post

    When the governing bodies of professional sports organizations negotiate contracts with TV networks and sponsors, media availability of the athletes is part of the deal. Not only is she not the first athlete or coach to hate this part of the job, but practically everyone I know, regardless of occupation, has parts of their job that they detest, but you do it because you want the paychecks. Maybe she should take a page out of Marshawn Lynch's playbook if she hates it that much. Or perhaps she could lead a movement among women tennis players have the WTA renegotiate the contracts to remove this duty from the job if they're willing to take a hit on the bottom line. It's ironic that Billie Jean King fought for the increased media coverage that Osaka despises.
    I suspect when Billie Jean fought for greater coverage she was thinking more of actual matches than press conferences.

    Leave a comment:


  • CookyMonzta
    replied
    My first thought, when I first heard about this was, next time she shows up at a press conference, and they ask a question that rubs her the wrong way, her response should be two words: "Next question."

    Leave a comment:

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