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  • Conor Dary
    replied
    Originally posted by gh View Post
    while I haven't read chapter and verse on the whole thing, nowhere have I ever seen the most crucial thing that would apply to track: can you accept prize money? (not something that applies to football and hoops, the big drivers of the legislation in the first place)
    How much prize money is there these days? At least compared to a scholarship or shoe contracts. Road races don't pay much except for marathons...and even that is only the top.

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  • KevinR
    replied
    Still too early to fully appreciate all of the ramifications, but I wonder about "boosters" from the local community paying huge sums for an athlete to endorse their car lot, or whatever. That would definitely be a key factor in shaping what programs rise to the top in the next few years.

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  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    Originally posted by Atticus View Post
    With the new NCAA ruling on Name-Image-Likeness (NIL), isn't that the end of the idea of having to leave the team to sign an endorsement deal?
    Any NCAA athlete can go pro now without losing their scholarship!!
    Yeah, if this ruling has come down a couple of years ago, a guy like Mondo who really enjoyed being part of a college team and who is somewhat of a celebrity in south Louisiana, might have stayed in school. And what about Zion Wlliamson? Perhaps Nike would have gave him the same deal regardless of whether he went to the NBA or stayed at Duke.
    Last edited by jazzcyclist; 07-01-2021, 04:21 PM.

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  • KevinR
    replied
    Kentucky's Governor, last week, signed an NIL bill allowing students to receive compensation for those purposes. It will be interesting to see how this impacts basketball. Conceivably, I can see college players making more money from NIL playing at a major school than they could in the G-League.

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  • gh
    replied
    while I haven't read chapter and verse on the whole thing, nowhere have I ever seen the most crucial thing that would apply to track: can you accept prize money? (not something that applies to football and hoops, the big drivers of the legislation in the first place)

    Leave a comment:


  • Atticus
    replied
    With the new NCAA ruling on Name-Image-Likeness (NIL), isn't that the end of the idea of having to leave the team to sign an endorsement deal?
    Any NCAA athlete can go pro now without losing their scholarship!!

    Leave a comment:


  • gh
    replied
    Originally posted by Powell View Post

    But can they still restrict athletes making money outside the college system, like T&F athletes earning prize money in the DL?
    that's the $64,000 question (or prize money at the WC)

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  • Powell
    replied
    Originally posted by ralmcg;n1697955The NCAA can still restrict non-educational sources of student-athlete funding, such as internships with shoe companies and a school paying for an expensive car for the athlete. /URL
    .
    But can they still restrict athletes making money outside the college system, like T&F athletes earning prize money in the DL?

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  • 26mi235
    replied
    Originally posted by ralmcg View Post
    I read the main opinion, not the concurring opinion. The NCAA can still restrict non-educational sources of student-athlete funding, such as internships with shoe companies and a school paying for an expensive car for the athlete. Full decision is at 20-512 National Collegiate Athletic Assn. v. Alston (06/21/2021) (supremecourt.gov).
    One of the Justices commented that the broader question about paying for playing. Basically, he thought that it would be applicable beyond the scope of the current ruling, and if treated like virtually any other industry the restrictions would not be legal.

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  • wamego relays champ
    replied
    Originally posted by polevaultpower View Post
    "track meets in Eugene" got a mention!
    Justice Kavanaugh clearly a fan of college sports.

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  • ralmcg
    replied
    I read the main opinion, not the concurring opinion. The NCAA can still restrict non-educational sources of student-athlete funding, such as internships with shoe companies and a school paying for an expensive car for the athlete. Full decision is at 20-512 National Collegiate Athletic Assn. v. Alston (06/21/2021) (supremecourt.gov).

    Leave a comment:


  • aaronk
    replied
    That would take all the fun out of stories like "Athing Mu Going Pro!".
    LOL

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  • Conor Dary
    replied
    Originally posted by polevaultpower View Post
    "track meets in Eugene" got a mention!
    Jolly good.

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  • gm
    replied
    This only really applies to those schools who actually make a profit, and there aren't many of them. Hopefully they will bill athletes at schools who show a loss.
    If I were a student who had to pay a "service fee" every semester to support a money-losing program, I would be more than upset if any of the players were taking in cash on the side without handing that over to those students who pay the fee.

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  • lonewolf
    replied
    Hmmm???? I may have been a professional athlete. Back in 1950-51, I (and others) was paid $20/month to sweep the basketball court at halftime for four games/year.... that and compete in four or five track and field events every Saturday during the season. Basketball players "officiated" at track meets.

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