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  • TN1965
    replied
    Originally posted by 18.99s View Post

    I was like "Paige who?"

    She's not even the most famous college athlete in her sport, unless fame is measured primarily by social media followers. Caitlin Clark and Fran Belibi (the dunker) have more name recognition, IMO.
    Belibi is not even the most famous player on her team. People may have seen her dunk on Sports Center, but they probably don't remember her name. Haley Jones (Final Four MOP) is used in every ESPN promo for Stanford games, and Cameron Brink has more insta followers than any other Stanford player.

    And you probably live somewhere in the Big Ten territory if you think Clark is famous.

    Leave a comment:


  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    Originally posted by 18.99s View Post

    Offering classes in AA studies is one thing, and a very important thing. Offering a whole degree in it and cajoling athletes to study it as their only major is another. Nobody's getting a job based on that degree except the tiny percentage who will get to teach it. Almost every degree named "_____ studies" is 99% useless in the job market.
    I agree with this, but mungo was pooh-poohing AA studies classes, so that's what I was addressing. AA studies degrees are useless. Kids would be better served majoring in history if they have a passion for AA studies, which is just a subset of American history, which just a subset of world history.

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  • 18.99s
    replied
    Originally posted by jazzcyclist View Post
    Ideally, there shouldn't be any African-American History classes because it should all be covered under American History. However, in this country that part of our history was whitewashed out of all the American History classes I had in school, so there are certain things I would have never learned about if I hadn't taken classes in college specifically aimed at the Black experience.
    Offering classes in AA studies is one thing, and a very important thing. Offering a whole degree in it and cajoling athletes to study it as their only major is another. Nobody's getting a job based on that degree except the tiny percentage who will get to teach it. Almost every degree named "_____ studies" is 99% useless in the job market.

    Leave a comment:


  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by jazzcyclist View Post
    Ideally, there shouldn't be any African-American History classes because it should all be covered under American History. However, in this country that part of our history was whitewashed out of all the American History classes I had in school, so there are certain things I would have never learned about if I hadn't taken classes in college specifically aimed at the Black experience. It's the same with the history of Red folks in this country where as kids we are taught that Cowboys were the good guys and the Indians were the bad guys.
    It rankles me rankled every February that we need to have a 'Black History Month' . . . but we do, for the reason you give. And yes, same with most other 'minorities', which apparently women are too (this being Women's History Month & November is Native American Heritage Month). All those poor pale-skinned people don't get a month - oh wait - every month is theirs! We are sooo far away from the goal.
    Last edited by Atticus; 03-25-2022, 05:57 PM.

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  • jazzcyclist
    replied
    Originally posted by mungo man View Post
    Instead schools like Duke University are offering them courses in "African American studies".
    At schools like UNC, student athletes are given grades they did not earn in classes like "Swahili" which they will never use.
    Ideally, there shouldn't be any African-American History classes because it should all be covered under American History. However, in this country that part of our history was whitewashed out of all the American History classes I had in school, so there are certain things I would have never learned about if I hadn't taken classes in college specifically aimed at the Black experience. It's the same with the history of Red folks in this country where as kids we are taught that Cowboys were the good guys and the Indians were the bad guys.

    There's no excuse for giving kids grades they didn't earn but surely you know that this is being done in many courses besides Swahili, which is spoken by more people worldwide than Italian or Swedish, not to mention Latin.

    Having said this, most of the athletes I know who are only in school for sports seem to major in Sports Management these days which is a total waste IMO. I know one well-known athlete who would have majored in Sports Management too if not for her college-educated parents, one of whom is a high school principal, who were having none of that.

    Leave a comment:


  • KevinR
    replied
    Kentucky is still waiting to hear about Oscar Tshiebwe's decision to go pro or remain in school. He is projected in the second round of the NBA draft, so no guaranteed contract. If he returns to UK, he has over $2M in NIL offers waiting for him. Those sponsors would probably not remain interested if he were just another journeyman in the pros. The times have certainly changed.

    Leave a comment:


  • 18.99s
    replied
    Originally posted by TN1965 View Post
    The superstar UConn Huskies point guard — who may very well be the most famous college athlete in the country at present — has taken full advantage of recent legislation that allows NCAA stars to make money off of their Name, Image, and Likeness (NIL).
    I was like "Paige who?"

    She's not even the most famous college athlete in her sport, unless fame is measured primarily by social media followers. Caitlin Clark and Fran Belibi (the dunker) have more name recognition, IMO.

    Leave a comment:


  • bad hammy
    replied
    . . . who may very well be the most famous college athlete in the country at present . . .


    Originally posted by Atticus View Post
    I don't follow either side of March Madness, but that is the first time I've ever heard of her . . .
    Yeah, I'm going with Hyperbole Alert on that one.


    Originally posted by Atticus View Post
    In any case, more power to her to leverage her NIL into bankable income!
    Yep - congrats to her - get it while she can!


    Leave a comment:


  • TN1965
    replied
    Originally posted by Atticus View Post
    I don't follow either side of March Madness, but that is the first time I've ever heard of her, and I can name dozens of NCAA football players (and even a few male basketball players, just thru incidental contact on Sports Center or the newspaper).

    In any case, more power to her to leverage her NIL into bankable income!
    She won all the National Player of the Year awards as a freshman last season. (Naismith, Wooden, AP, USWBA, ESPN, etc.)

    She got injured early this season, and just came back right before the tournament. But she is doing very well of the court.

    Leave a comment:


  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by TN1965 View Post
    "Paige Bueckers can rake in more NIL money than the top 9 men's stars in the Sweet 16 combined — who may very well be the most famous college athlete in the country at present"
    I don't follow either side of March Madness, but that is the first time I've ever heard of her, and I can name dozens of NCAA football players (and even a few male basketball players, just thru incidental contact on Sports Center or the newspaper).

    In any case, more power to her to leverage her NIL into bankable income!

    Leave a comment:


  • TN1965
    replied
    Paige Bueckers can rake in more NIL money than the top 9 men's stars in the Sweet 16 combined

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/paige-bue...165852129.html

    The superstar UConn Huskies point guard — who may very well be the most famous college athlete in the country at present — has taken full advantage of recent legislation that allows NCAA stars to make money off of their Name, Image, and Likeness (NIL).

    Leave a comment:


  • KevinR
    replied
    Originally posted by Atticus View Post
    Uh oh, duck and cover!
    It was at this point that the situation took a drastic turn for the worse................

    Leave a comment:


  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by mungo man
    Instead schools like Duke University are offering them courses in "African American studies".
    At schools like UNC, student athletes are given grades they did not earn in classes like "Swahili" which they will never use.
    The point is that instead of offering students useless classes . . .
    Uh oh, duck and cover!

    Leave a comment:


  • KevinR
    replied
    They still have choices. They may choose to go to a four year school for athletics, or they may choose to go to a Community College to learn a trade. I would really like to see four-year schools teach more technical degrees, but that will only be driven by demand from their consumers.

    If the athletes are going to become employees of the university, they should have some academic agreements/responsibilities in their favor. Their "collective representatives" could make the case for including more trades-based courses. Unless there is a motivation to do so, I doubt the Unis will make any change whatsoever. Short of expanding the athletics programs at two-year institutions (not fiscally possible), or establishing a broad and vibrant club-based system outside of academia, that is the best path for change.

    Leave a comment:


  • scottmitchell74
    replied
    Originally posted by mungo man View Post


    Currently students athletes don't have the option of attending a community college in order to learn the trades I mentioned above. Some of them probably want to take classes in HVAC, plumbing, Pharmacy technician, cosmetology etc and pursue two year degrees. But the option is not available.

    Instead schools like Duke University are offering them courses in "African American studies".
    At schools like UNC, student athletes are given grades they did not earn in classes like "Swahili" which they will never use.

    The point is that instead of offering students useless classes. Instead of focusing on whether some students get paid. The focus should be on offering students the opportunity to gain useful skills.
    If the opportunity is offered and students don't take it , then blame the student.
    Yes! My 18 and 21 year olds are young women but had they been boys I would have suggested more firmly that they consider trades. There will be a swing back soon, I think. Becaue of the dearth of tradesmen they can demand more $$ and as more and more young folk wake up to that maybe traditionally 4-year schools will offer these courses.

    Leave a comment:

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