Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

NCAA Amateurism Lawsuit

Collapse

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • LSU's Sean Burrell recently signed an NIL deal with a Baton Rouge law firm that also happens to be a major LSU booster. It will be interesting to see what type of deals other elite college track and field athletes get.

    College football is having its busiest off-season in history which should come as no surprise. The NIL/transfer portal rules have changed the game forever and Jimbo Fisher and the Texas A&M boosters are apparently playing it better than anyone else. Meanwhile, Lane Kiffin is lamenting the fact that Ole Miss is having trouble competing in this new era, and joked that Texas A&M may have to pay a luxury tax. I don't know why Fisher is so defensive. It's all legal now Jimbo. Many coaches are more concerned with the transfer portal, in which every player is an unrestricted free 365 days per year, and they want restrictions put on it. But give credit to Mario Cristobal who says that coaches should be held to the same standard as the players.

    I feel like we’re dipping our toe in the NFL pool. We gotta go one way or the other. Either full into it or out of it. If there’s a transfer portal and coaches also make moves, both coaches and players should be held to the same standard. Say, ‘OK, there’s a period of time after the season and spring ball when both parties can use it and there’s clarity on what moves are being made,’ then we might resolve a lot of these issues. If you don’t, I think it becomes a trust and safety issue because of lack of a number of personnel at certain positions.
    https://www.on3.com/college/miami-hu...mi-hurricanes/

    I'll leave it to gh to determine if this discussion needs a separate thread in the "Things Not T&F" forum
    Last edited by jazzcyclist; 02-04-2022, 04:39 PM.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by jazzcyclist View Post
      The NIL/transfer portal has changed the game forever.
      Tafny for UOY (Understatement of the Year).

      Jimbo is definitely a gamer; Saban will have to respond in kind to keep his step ahead.

      Comment


      • That puts an interesting spin on things. Is it appropriate for the University to be pushing NIL opportunities as recruiting tools? I can see value in having an office to assist athletes in understanding the rules, potential pitfalls, contract stuff (as they cannot have agents).

        Comment


        • With these NIL rules John Chaplin would have had a field day in getting the best athletes to Pullman.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by KevinR View Post
            I can see value in having an office to assist athletes in understanding the rules, potential pitfalls, contract stuff (as they cannot have agents).
            How 'bout a nice restraint-of-trade lawsuit? If I can make beaucoup money off my NIL, an agent is necessary.

            Comment


            • Pete Thamel tweet:

              A source tells ESPN that Grambling State University is set to announce a Name Image and Likeness deal for all of its scholarship student athletes, where every Grambling athlete receives annual income for their NIL. The deal is believed to be the first of its kind.
              https://mobile.twitter.com/petethame...99548862357511

              Alcyallen won't like this. 😄

              Comment


              • Originally posted by jazzcyclist View Post
                Pete Thamel tweet:



                https://mobile.twitter.com/petethame...99548862357511

                Alcyallen won't like this. 😄
                Poor guy. What does he do with his time now?
                You there, on the motorbike! Sell me one of your melons!

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Atticus View Post
                  How 'bout a nice restraint-of-trade lawsuit? If I can make beaucoup money off my NIL, an agent is necessary.
                  A good point. That would be one of the best funded legal battles in US history, as a whole bunch of universities would have a lot of money on the line.

                  Comment


                  • LSU athletes are getting another slice of the pie. I can imagine NIL's causing some college football and basketball players in the future to delay turning pro if they're projected to be a low-round draft pick or not drafted at all. College basketball may be the biggest beneficiariy of the new NIL rules.

                    In the latest development surrounding name, image and likeness opportunities, LSU will begin selling customizable jerseys with football players' names on them ahead of the 2022 season.

                    Players will receive a portion of the profits. That wasn't possible before NIL deals became a reality last summer. Since then, group licensing has allowed players to use school logos in certain cases, resulting in items such as the official Nike jerseys.
                    https://www.theadvocate.com/baton_ro...f4477d3ac.html

                    Comment


                    • According a press release by the Ohio State Athletic Department, Buckeye athletes have thus far made $2.98 million off of NIL deals. I have a hunch that that figure will grow significantly in the coming years and that these sort of press releases will become part of the arms race of big-time college football and basketball.

                      https://www.si.com/college/ohiostate...eals-edge-team

                      Comment


                      • There is too much myopia from activists like Jay Bilas. Too much emphasis on making money as if most athletes will make money. The number of athletes who will actually make good money from jersey sales and endorsements is very limited. Less than 5%. And that gig will last 4 years. For some it will totally distract them from their studies. Giving an 18 year old $10,000 and expecting them to remain focused on their studies is short sighted.

                        The real issue is not whether athletes can get money in the short term. Its what they will do after their 4 years of eligibility is finished. How will they pay rent, pay for a car, medical insurance and so forth?
                        Many are leaving college without any useful skills. And 50% of those who go to the NFL only play for only 3 years.

                        Rather than focus on how much money athletes can make in the short term, it would be great if LSU for example could partner with Baton Rouge community college and have athletes work towards two year diplomas in carpentry, welding, HVAC, Medical Assistant, cosmetology, mechanic, electrician, childcare, Pharmacy technician and other two year degrees for which there is an acute shortage at the moment.

                        Rather than focus on short term financial gain, Activists should be demanding that schools ensure that every athlete is making progress towards a 2 year degree or a 4 year degree. Schools like Duke should stop offering classes in "African American studies" and other courses that add no value and instead ask athletes to work towards two year degrees that provide useable skills. Which pay very well I might add.

                        This is the reform we need in my opinion.
                        Last edited by mungo man; 02-08-2022, 03:46 PM.

                        Comment


                        • Also it would be great if LSU for example would use the $95 million in revenue that they earn in a year to reduce the financial burden on parents and students who are the fans that are actually generating this revenue. This means using the money to subsidize tuition, books and room and board for students. Instead of paying ADs, coaches and bowl officials ridiculously high salaries.

                          Why for example does the CEO of the Outback bowl and the Cotton Bowl getting paid $1 million a year. What does he do all year?
                          It would be much better if the revenue from college sports went towards reducing the financial burden of the actual fans.

                          . The goodwill from the gesture would likely double the revenue. But it would only work if it was required by regulations.
                          Last edited by mungo man; 02-08-2022, 03:50 PM.

                          Comment


                          • Mungo Man, your posts make some valid points, beyond the general discussion on this thread. Decisions about what is in the best interest of the individual students still rest on the students and their families. Your case for two-year degrees with job potential is also a good one, but is probably geared more toward Community and Junior Colleges.

                            Perhaps with the potential for a lot of the money apparel companies pay to the University athletic departments going directly to the players, we will see a small shift in admin salaries. But I expect the only way that you will see improvements in funding for academic programs is if the schools are driven to by market forces. Maybe changes to student loan structures. In any event, it is a pretty big problem to get our hands around.

                            Comment


                            • Here's the link to LSU's official NIL policy from the LSU Board of Supervisors:

                              https://www.lsu.edu/bos/docs/policie...-2021-june.pdf

                              I would assume that the NIL policies at most other NCAA Division I universities use almost identical language. There are two things that caught my eye.:

                              Section IV, part d:
                              Athletics boosters are prohibited from creating or facilitating NIL compensation opportunities for prospective student-athletes as a recruiting inducement or current student-athlete as an inducement to remain enrolled at her respective postsecondary institution.
                              This is downright comical, since every Power 5 school in the nation as well as a few others are now blatantly violating this rule, but I guess the NCAA has just thrown their hands at this point.


                              Section VIII:
                              . . . . . An intercollegiate athlete shall not enter into a contract for compensation for the use of the intercollegiate athlete’s NIL if a term of the contract conflicts with a term of the intercollegiate athlete’s athletics program’s team contract.
                              I guess athletes are free to sign NIL deals with shoe companies as long as it's with the same shoe company that his/her school's team already has a contract with.

                              Comment


                              • Fueled by the NIL momentum, athletes at USC and UCLA are trying to get legally classified as employees of their university.

                                https://www.cbssports.com/college-fo...a-usc-players/

                                They better be careful what they wish for. If they win, most athletic scholarships will go away (can't get classified as an employee if you're voluntarily on the team for free).

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X