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  • So scholarships would go away, with those athletes now being named school employees. Walk-ons would then become un-compensated employees? Would all players be provided with a minimum benefits package? It may not make much of a difference at the grass-roots level. But they will then face some friction with regard to their NIL licensing. Not a law dude, myself, but I know that employees can have more restrictions on that sort of thing than, say, an independent contractor.

    They may find more power in seeking to be named independent contractors, honestly.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by KevinR View Post
      So scholarships would go away, with those athletes now being named school employees. Walk-ons would then become un-compensated employees? Would all players be provided with a minimum benefits package?
      Starters would get a compensation package including tuition, room & board, and a salary while everybody else becomes a walk-on because the universities don't want to deal with the encumbrances of an employee relationship for bench players (benefits, W-2s, unemployment, Social Security withholdings etc.). Walk-ons would be amateur volunteers, like the players for a high school team or recreational league.

      They may find more power in seeking to be named independent contractors, honestly.
      True.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by KevinR View Post
        Mungo Man, your posts make some valid points, beyond the general discussion on this thread. Decisions about what is in the best interest of the individual students still rest on the students and their families. Your case for two-year degrees with job potential is also a good one, but is probably geared more toward Community and Junior Colleges.

        Perhaps with the potential for a lot of the money apparel companies pay to the University athletic departments going directly to the players, we will see a small shift in admin salaries. But I expect the only way that you will see improvements in funding for academic programs is if the schools are driven to by market forces. Maybe changes to student loan structures. In any event, it is a pretty big problem to get our hands around.
        Yep
        Thats why I said big schools should partner with community colleges and junior colleges.
        As it is, a high percentage of division one basketball players are junior college transfers. Which means they already get about half their college credits from a junior college. They then transfer the credits to the big school.

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        • Originally posted by mungo man View Post

          Yep
          Thats why I said big schools should partner with community colleges and junior colleges.
          As it is, a high percentage of division one basketball players are junior college transfers. Which means they already get about half their college credits from a junior college. They then transfer the credits to the big school.
          Hmmm. Not so sure of that. Define high percentage. I would wager it is less than 10%. So my gut level response was off. Looks closer to 20%.
          Last edited by donley2; 02-10-2022, 03:21 PM.

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          • Originally posted by donley2 View Post

            Hmmm. Not so sure of that. Define high percentage. I would wager it is less than 10%. So my gut level response was off. Looks closer to 20%.
            10% is a high percentage. It means its not rare. It means there are thousands of players transferring JC credits to 4 year colleges each year.

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            • Originally posted by mungo man View Post

              Yep
              Thats why I said big schools should partner with community colleges and junior colleges.
              As it is, a high percentage of division one basketball players are junior college transfers. Which means they already get about half their college credits from a junior college. They then transfer the credits to the big school.
              A partnership arrangement would be one way, where it is feasible. But at the end of the day, it should be the responsibility of the student and family to make the decision which is best for them. Legally, most students are capable of making decisions, for themselves. They should bear some responsibility for the ramifications of their choices.

              But I share your thoughts on Community Colleges being of more value to young adults than they are given credit for.

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              • Originally posted by KevinR View Post

                A partnership arrangement would be one way, where it is feasible. But at the end of the day, it should be the responsibility of the student and family to make the decision which is best for them. Legally, most students are capable of making decisions, for themselves. They should bear some responsibility for the ramifications of their choices.

                But I share your thoughts on Community Colleges being of more value to young adults than they are given credit for.

                Currently students athletes don't have the option of attending a community college in order to learn the trades I mentioned above. Some of them probably want to take classes in HVAC, plumbing, Pharmacy technician, cosmetology etc and pursue two year degrees. But the option is not available.

                Instead schools like Duke University are offering them courses in "African American studies".
                At schools like UNC, student athletes are given grades they did not earn in classes like "Swahili" which they will never use.

                The point is that instead of offering students useless classes. Instead of focusing on whether some students get paid. The focus should be on offering students the opportunity to gain useful skills.
                If the opportunity is offered and students don't take it , then blame the student.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by mungo man View Post


                  Currently students athletes don't have the option of attending a community college in order to learn the trades I mentioned above. Some of them probably want to take classes in HVAC, plumbing, Pharmacy technician, cosmetology etc and pursue two year degrees. But the option is not available.

                  Instead schools like Duke University are offering them courses in "African American studies".
                  At schools like UNC, student athletes are given grades they did not earn in classes like "Swahili" which they will never use.

                  The point is that instead of offering students useless classes. Instead of focusing on whether some students get paid. The focus should be on offering students the opportunity to gain useful skills.
                  If the opportunity is offered and students don't take it , then blame the student.
                  Yes! My 18 and 21 year olds are young women but had they been boys I would have suggested more firmly that they consider trades. There will be a swing back soon, I think. Becaue of the dearth of tradesmen they can demand more $$ and as more and more young folk wake up to that maybe traditionally 4-year schools will offer these courses.
                  You there, on the motorbike! Sell me one of your melons!

                  Comment


                  • They still have choices. They may choose to go to a four year school for athletics, or they may choose to go to a Community College to learn a trade. I would really like to see four-year schools teach more technical degrees, but that will only be driven by demand from their consumers.

                    If the athletes are going to become employees of the university, they should have some academic agreements/responsibilities in their favor. Their "collective representatives" could make the case for including more trades-based courses. Unless there is a motivation to do so, I doubt the Unis will make any change whatsoever. Short of expanding the athletics programs at two-year institutions (not fiscally possible), or establishing a broad and vibrant club-based system outside of academia, that is the best path for change.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by mungo man
                      Instead schools like Duke University are offering them courses in "African American studies".
                      At schools like UNC, student athletes are given grades they did not earn in classes like "Swahili" which they will never use.
                      The point is that instead of offering students useless classes . . .
                      Uh oh, duck and cover!

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Atticus View Post
                        Uh oh, duck and cover!
                        It was at this point that the situation took a drastic turn for the worse................

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                        • Paige Bueckers can rake in more NIL money than the top 9 men's stars in the Sweet 16 combined

                          https://www.yahoo.com/news/paige-bue...165852129.html

                          The superstar UConn Huskies point guard — who may very well be the most famous college athlete in the country at present — has taken full advantage of recent legislation that allows NCAA stars to make money off of their Name, Image, and Likeness (NIL).

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by TN1965 View Post
                            "Paige Bueckers can rake in more NIL money than the top 9 men's stars in the Sweet 16 combined — who may very well be the most famous college athlete in the country at present"
                            I don't follow either side of March Madness, but that is the first time I've ever heard of her, and I can name dozens of NCAA football players (and even a few male basketball players, just thru incidental contact on Sports Center or the newspaper).

                            In any case, more power to her to leverage her NIL into bankable income!

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Atticus View Post
                              I don't follow either side of March Madness, but that is the first time I've ever heard of her, and I can name dozens of NCAA football players (and even a few male basketball players, just thru incidental contact on Sports Center or the newspaper).

                              In any case, more power to her to leverage her NIL into bankable income!
                              She won all the National Player of the Year awards as a freshman last season. (Naismith, Wooden, AP, USWBA, ESPN, etc.)

                              She got injured early this season, and just came back right before the tournament. But she is doing very well of the court.

                              Comment


                              • . . . who may very well be the most famous college athlete in the country at present . . .


                                Originally posted by Atticus View Post
                                I don't follow either side of March Madness, but that is the first time I've ever heard of her . . .
                                Yeah, I'm going with Hyperbole Alert on that one.


                                Originally posted by Atticus View Post
                                In any case, more power to her to leverage her NIL into bankable income!
                                Yep - congrats to her - get it while she can!


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