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  • Cooter Brown
    replied
    I think that when the big schools have their current Nike/Adidas/etc. contract about to expire, the new contracts will include a cut for athletes in at least football and basketball. What's another $850K to Nike to add in a $10K NIL contract for each scholarship football player in order to get the apparel contract for a blue blood program.

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  • 18.99s
    replied
    Originally posted by Atticus View Post
    So my point remains - NIL changes the entire landscape of what it means to go pro in track.
    For track, only a few blades of grass on the landscape will change, not the entire landscape. Nobody in college T&F will get a NIL deal worth more than the equivalent of a full-time minimum wage job, except 3 categories:

    (1) U of Oregon athletes,
    (2) Olympic or Worlds medalists at other colleges, and
    (3) Teen phenoms who were in the headlines throughout their high school years (e.g. Cain, Syd, Felix, B.Williams, Mu if they had enrolled and stayed in the NCAA).

    The last 2 categories combined will be less than a half-dozen athletes in any given year, sometimes none.

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  • gh
    replied
    the key to Hocker may lie in the fact that I've still never seen any indication that one could accept DL prize money and remain eligible for NCAA competition.

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  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
    When you make one that makes sense....let us know.
    Arguing with fools (which each thinks the other is) is . . . foolish. PROVING that we are both indeed fools!
    I needn't address it further.

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  • Conor Dary
    replied
    Still missing my point .

    When you make one that makes sense....let us know...

    I'll guess that people like Hocker were attracted to NOT running for Oregon as he prepares for 22, 23, 24.

    This is probably the silliest thing you've ever said....which is quite a high bar....

    Have you ever met Hocker? Or know the slightest thing about him. I saw him Friday in town and mentioned we missed him Thursday....he looked a bit sad.

    He won NCAAs indoors, outdoors....the Trials and 6th in Tokyo in 3:31....at 20...so yeah definitely needs to change his program.... why stick with what works.
    Last edited by Conor Dary; 09-26-2021, 09:54 PM.

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  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
    Why can't Nike do that for whomever they wish....
    When that happens let us know....they have zero reason to do so in track.
    Still missing my point . . . . sigh.
    In the past, you couldn't turn pro (i.e., get paid for your sport) and retain your scholarship. Now you can.
    What NIL has done is make it much easier to get paid, in addition to the value of your scholatship. This will help the little guy (BYU women), but may hurt the big guy, who, if he signs an exclusive NIL contract while in college, may make it more difficult to get a fat contract to 'go pro' in the old sense. The Studs will still get their money, of course.

    So my point remains - NIL changes the entire landscape of what it means to go pro in track. For Oregon athletes, it goes far beyond shoes and gear. Now Nike can throw in some serious cash to the ones they like, while keeping them running for OU. I'll guess that people like Hocker were attracted to NOT running for Oregon as he prepares for 22, 23, 24. Otherwise he could have had his cake and eat it too. The difference is that 'full pro' means Nike can dictate his racing plans also . . . although who knows how NIL contracts will be written. It's a Brave New World.

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  • Conor Dary
    replied
    Why can't Nike do that for whomever they wish....

    When that happens let us know....they have zero reason to do so in track.

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  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by 18.99s View Post
    Very few college athletes are worth paying $100,000 for a NIL agreement.
    Again, not my point.
    BYU women are now sewn up in NIL deals. Why can't Nike do that for whomever they wish, at whatever the market asks ($100-$1,000,000?).
    That is a 'professional' deal, yet they retain their scholarships. The thin line between amateur (NCAA athlete) and pro is being erased as we watch.

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  • 18.99s
    replied
    Originally posted by Atticus View Post
    The NIL ruling just put more major cracks in the NCAA dam against athletes going pro and maintaining their eligibility.



    What's to stop Nike from offering $100,000 to athletes to sign NIL agreements? That's certainly 'going pro'.
    Very few college athletes are worth paying $100,000 for a NIL agreement.

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  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
    I have no idea why they signed him.
    Which is beside my point. Now Nike can sign whomever they wish to exclusive NIL contracts. Voila! de facto pro.

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  • Conor Dary
    replied
    Originally posted by Atticus View Post
    Why did they sign Hocker?
    Answer - to get him in their stable of athletes as 'influencers' / product endorsements.
    I have no idea why they signed him. It could be another company wanted to pay him to go pro and Nike stepped in.

    He had more appeal and influence running at Oregon.

    For next year in Eugene I'm sure Nike wanted local star Hocker in Nike. But as far as influence goes Nike has already won the battle. My seat at Pre was near the start and it was funny seeing lots of non Nike people running in Nikes with the top all white. Of course Josh Kerr got 3rd in Tokyo running in white top Nikes.
    Last edited by Conor Dary; 09-26-2021, 04:18 PM.

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  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
    Why would a shoe company bother? The school is already under a shoe contract.
    Why did they sign Hocker?
    Answer - to get him in their stable of athletes as 'influencers' / product endorsements.

    Leave a comment:


  • Conor Dary
    replied
    Originally posted by Atticus View Post
    The NIL ruling just put more major cracks in the NCAA dam against athletes going pro and maintaining their eligibility.



    What's to stop Nike from offering $100,000 to athletes to sign NIL agreements? That's certainly 'going pro'.
    Why would a shoe company bother? The school is already under a shoe contract.

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  • Atticus
    replied
    The NIL ruling just put more major cracks in the NCAA dam against athletes going pro and maintaining their eligibility.

    SmartyStreets enters into NIL deal with all female athletes at BYU
    Another big drop in the Name, Image and Likeness bucket has fallen in Provo, with address verification company SmartyStreets entering into a deal with all female student-athletes at BYU on Tuesday.
    The deal was first reported by Garrett McClintock on Twitter and confirmed by BYU Athletics. The deal includes all walk-ons and the Cougarettes and will provide each athlete $6,000 annually.
    What's to stop Nike from offering $100,000 to athletes to sign NIL agreements? That's certainly 'going pro'.

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  • KevinR
    replied
    This might be a reflection of my age, but I was somewhat surprised to see that many of the athletes here in Alabama who are taking advantage of this are doing so in on-line venues. I had half-expected to see higher profile athletes hocking car dealerships (which may still occur). I was not aware that there were web sites which would allow you to have celebrities record personal audio or video recordings of themselves. For particularly popular athletes, that type of venture could require a lot of time investment, which has to come from somewhere.

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