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  • #16
    Originally posted by scottmitchell74 View Post
    Nothing is actually how the MSM would have you believe it is.
    No knock on your use of the term, but the "MSM" doesn't exist as one unified hegemony over the masses.
    I read CNN and Fox every day (polar opposites), and many things in between. I get the good, the bad, and the ugly.
    There are plenty of great (happy) stories that led up to - and are being told now that the Games have started.
    There is also little agreement in the "MSM", so they can hardly influence one way or the other.
    Much of what I read is also very trustworthy. The rest is obvious in its worthlessness.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Atticus View Post
      No knock on your use of the term, but the "MSM" doesn't exist as one unified hegemony over the masses.
      I read CNN and Fox every day (polar opposites), and many things in between. I get the good, the bad, and the ugly.
      There are plenty of great (happy) stories that led up to - and are being told now that the Games have started.
      There is also little agreement in the "MSM", so they can hardly influence one way or the other.
      Much of what I read is also very trustworthy. The rest is obvious in its worthlessness.
      I wish I shared your view. I watch the still mostly neutral local news, but I have zero faith in the MSM which has the most powerful thing in common...$$$...I haven't seen a major network news show/update/report that wasn't slanted in many years, and I have the same basic reaction CD had in Roxanne when he got a newpaper out of the machine.
      You there, on the motorbike! Sell me one of your melons!

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      • #18
        Originally posted by guru View Post
        That was one helluva bike race. Holy cow.

        Also great crowd support on the course from start to finish. So much for everyone in the country not wanting these Games to happen.
        News flash: "Japanese people" are not monolithic entity.

        There are people who go to see a road cycling race. And there are people who are upset because it creates congestion and increases transmission risk.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by TN1965 View Post
          News flash: "Japanese people" are not monolithic entity.

          And yet, some around here are portraying them as exactly that...

          There are no strings on me

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Atticus View Post
            No knock on your use of the term, but the "MSM" doesn't exist as one unified hegemony over the masses.
            I read CNN and Fox every day (polar opposites), and many things in between. I get the good, the bad, and the ugly.
            There are plenty of great (happy) stories that led up to - and are being told now that the Games have started.
            There is also little agreement in the "MSM", so they can hardly influence one way or the other.
            Much of what I read is also very trustworthy. The rest is obvious in its worthlessness.
            It is a cliche, but "media" are always plural. Well, except in the totalitarian societies where the state media have no competition.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by TN1965 View Post
              It is a cliche, but "media" are always plural.
              MSM is now used as a collective singular.

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              • #22
                Awesome men's road race! Great ride by young American Brandon McNulty.

                Medal ceremony for the road race....masks were on the three medalists until after they had their medals, then off for photos. Let them remove them as they walk out for the ceremony. And for those who haven't seen one of the medal ceremonies yet, the medalists step onto their respective podium and an official walks out with the three medals on a small platter and offers them to the athletes, starting with the bronze medalist, who then pick their medals off the platter and place them around their own necks. Pretty COVID-paranoid. There's something to be said for the gesture of someone else placing the medal around the neck of the athlete.

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                • #23
                  Tennis players finding July Tokyo heat and humidity "brutal". Who could have foreseen that?!
                  https://www.cnn.com/2021/07/24/sport...ntl/index.html

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by DrJay View Post
                    Awesome men's road race! Great ride by young American Brandon McNulty.

                    Medal ceremony for the road race....masks were on the three medalists until after they had their medals, then off for photos. Let them remove them as they walk out for the ceremony. And for those who haven't seen one of the medal ceremonies yet, the medalists step onto their respective podium and an official walks out with the three medals on a small platter and offers them to the athletes, starting with the bronze medalist, who then pick their medals off the platter and place them around their own necks. Pretty COVID-paranoid. There's something to be said for the gesture of someone else placing the medal around the neck of the athlete.
                    At least they have presenters. At the US Figure Skating Championship in January. skaters picked up their medals from a table before getting on the podium. Bradie Tennel posted a photo on her social media, and she did not seem to mind that at all.

                    Speaking of figure skating, the World Championship in March was also held behind closed doors. When Nathan Chen finished his free skate, the "spectators" (other skaters, coaches, off-duty officials) gave him a standing ovation. That was one of the greatest moments I have seen in any sports. The ultimate praise is the one from your peer.

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                    • #25
                      Mrs. DrJay found this one.

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                      • #26
                        I don't get this one DrJay. Please explain for humor-challenged folks like myself.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by jazzcyclist View Post
                          I don't get this one DrJay. Please explain for humor-challenged folks like myself.
                          And me.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by lonewolf View Post
                            And me.
                            It's just that we get inured to how stupendously talented and fit these athletes are. In the m100 final, someone will come in last and **GASP** not even break 10.00, so we think, 'What a loser!'
                            But if Joe Sixpack were out there, running his 14.27, we could see just how amazing all these athletes are.
                            Last edited by Atticus; 07-25-2021, 04:22 PM.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Atticus View Post
                              It's just that we get inured to how stupendously talented and fit these athletes are. In the m100 final, someone will come in last and **GASP** not even break 10.00, so we think, 'What a loser!'
                              But if Joe Sixpack were out there, running his 14.27, we could see just how amazing all these athletes are.
                              You may actually be giving Joe too much credit.

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                              • #30
                                On a similar tack, I remember a few Olympics back (it might have been Sydney in 2000), reading a newspaper article by the British-based American writer Bill Bryson. He had spent a day moving around venues watching a number of sports but it wasn't until about the fifth one that he saw a sport he had ever tried himself. It was table tennis and he watched the number 1 ranked woman. He soon realised that he would probably only manage to return about 1 in 10 of her serves. It then dawned on him that the exponents of the other sports he had previously seen must have been of a similarly outstanding level but his unfamiliarity with their sports meant that he was unable to appreciate it.

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