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  • Texas, Oklahoma to SEC talk

    https://www.espn.com/college-footbal...-want-join-sec

  • #2
    Boooooooooo!!!!!!!!!

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    • #3
      Seems wrong somehow.
      You there, on the motorbike! Sell me one of your melons!

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      • #4
        Just be done with it and let the super-powers form their own Division Zero.
        We know who all the usual suspects are and the lesser-lights have no business trying to play them except as chum for their next big game.

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        • #5
          No conference should be so large that it cannot play a complete round-robin in every sport. Sixteen teams in one conference is two conferences. give em two names and separate schedules, not North/South or East/West divisions. I believe preserving long-time rivalries is important in maintaining fan interest and loyalty. Maybe it is just me but the geographical scatter-shop inconsistency of leagues irritates me. If a team is isolated or outgrows/drops behind its historical league, it might make sense. This makes no awnaw

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          • #6
            Sounds about right....be where the big money is.

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            • #7
              Love to see those LSU vs RinkyDinky State done away with, a 40 point spread is crazy.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by lonewolf View Post
                No conference should be so large that it cannot play a complete round-robin in every sport. Sixteen teams in one conference is two conferences. give em two names and separate schedules, not North/South or East/West divisions. I believe preserving long-time rivalries is important in maintaining fan interest and loyalty. Maybe it is just me but the geographical scatter-shop inconsistency of leagues irritates me. If a team is isolated or outgrows/drops behind its historical league, it might make sense. This makes no awnaw
                I agree 100%, but that ship sailed a long time ago. Heck, one of my two teams growing up, U of L (the other was UK) has been maybe the biggest nomad among major colleges. The Missouri Valley Conference in the mid-1960s till 1975, then the Metro Conference till the mid-1990s, then Conference USA, then the Big East, then the American Athletic Conference for a year, and now the ACC. The old versions of the ACC, SEC, Big Ten, Big Eight, SWC, and PAC-whatever mostly made geographic sense compared to today's alignments.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by DrJay View Post

                  I agree 100%, but that ship sailed a long time ago. Heck, one of my two teams growing up, U of L (the other was UK) has been maybe the biggest nomad among major colleges. The Missouri Valley Conference in the mid-1960s till 1975, then the Metro Conference till the mid-1990s, then Conference USA, then the Big East, then the American Athletic Conference for a year, and now the ACC. The old versions of the ACC, SEC, Big Ten, Big Eight, SWC, and PAC-whatever mostly made geographic sense compared to today's alignments.
                  Imagine being a hardcore Cardinals fan and having to change your cable subscription annually just to make sure you could get their games on the "Conference Network".

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                  • #10
                    I don't like it, either, Lonewolf. But there is no way the SEC would say no to that kind of money. I'm a traditionalist so I'd go back to the old ten-team SEC, if I could. Even bring back Georgia Tech, Tulane, and Sewanee! LOL Speaking of Sewanee, if you've never seen this piece on their 1899 team that beat the Longhorns and every team they faced, here it is. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x7Fq7C3DRzs

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                    • #11
                      Thanks, Bill Vol. I lived in Texas, have been a Texas track official for fifty years, and have never heard this story. The most famous Texas legend is waterboy Rooster Andrews kicking a field goal to beat Texas A&M. Rooster was a track official for more than 60 years. Everybody knew Rooster and he knew everybody. I never thought to ask him if the legend was true. It would have been like questioning the Bible in a seminary.

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                      • #12
                        I know it is all about the money, but I wish they would knock this crap off. How much longer until they have to select 64 teams just to make the Conference tournament?

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                        • #13
                          Great to know about Rooster and cool that you knew him!

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                          • #14
                            Gotta be an interesting story behind the name, too.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by KevinR View Post
                              Gotta be an interesting story behind the name, too.
                              I don't remember Rooster's civilian name if I ever knew it. He was a small, outgoing, reddish-haired man who ran the finish line for 50 plus years. He was a Texas Relays official for, I think, 62 years and argued with the record keepers until his death because they would not give him credit for setting hurdles four years while he was in college. Rooster never met a stranger or forgot a name or face. I swear, he knew 300 Relays officials and their event. He owned a sporting goods store that did a lot of business with UT.

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