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  • 2021 College Football

    Normally I would wait until the preseason rankings come out before I start this thread but with so much news being made off the field with the new NIL rules and conference realignment, I figured now is as good a time as any. I guess it's only fitting that Texas and Oklahoma would be the first dominoes to fall in the "Wild, Wild West Era of College Football". Here are a few questions?

    1. Will there be any policing of the NIL rules or will the schools with the richest and most enthusiastic boosters hoard all the best athletes?
    2. Will schools use the NIL rules to entice football players to exhaust their eligibility?
    3. Will Notre Dame remain independent?
    4. Will the ACC and Pac 12 come out of this year unscathed?
    5. Vanderbilt is obviously the answer to the "Which one of these things is not like the others" song. Will the SEC ever give them the boot?

  • #2
    Football is the least affected by this, but an interesting conundrum anyway -- foreign athletes could lose their visas if they earn money through NIL?

    https://www.espn.com/college-sports/...m-seems-answer

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    • #3
      For basketball, and to a lesser extent football and baseball, I expect the NIL change to keep those athletes who will not expect the big signing bonuses from risking going early. In basketball, if you are at best a second rounder, you can probably make more money by staying in college and making money there, while getting a lot of playing time and dedicated coaching. Now a lot of those guys go G League or overseas, but the G League may not pay as well, and few guys start out overseas and ever make it back to the NBA.

      I do not know of any reason that the "boosters" will not take a very active role in keeping kids in school, or enticing them to attend particular schools. We all hear about the kid at a D1 school who gets a new "loaner" car to drive around campus while his own car is in the shop......for years. In the future, he will just be able to endorse the dealership on a commercial, and take the cash outright.

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      • #4
        I wonder in the long term how much money will really be made by the non-star athletes. Yes, the absolute stars will make quite a bit, but after the initial excitement I wonder about the "regular" athletes.
        You there, on the motorbike! Sell me one of your melons!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by gm View Post
          Football is the least affected by this, but an interesting conundrum anyway -- foreign athletes could lose their visas if they earn money through NIL?
          https://www.espn.com/college-sports/...m-seems-answer
          That's funny, because many foreign collegians have already received compensation from their clubs/associations.

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          • #6
            How long before a huge scandal breaks when they find out boosters are paying big bucks for NIL merchandising.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by scottmitchell74 View Post
              I wonder in the long term how much money will really be made by the non-star athletes. Yes, the absolute stars will make quite a bit, but after the initial excitement I wonder about the "regular" athletes.
              you mean most of them- including D2 and D3, most of D1, both men and women.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Atticus View Post
                How long before a huge scandal breaks when they find out boosters are paying big bucks for NIL merchandising.
                I am not sure that would be a scandal, under these guidelines. It seems like a logical transition.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by KevinR View Post
                  I am not sure that would be a scandal, under these guidelines. It seems like a logical transition.
                  Then the rich will simply get richer and they'll ensure they not only get the very best, but that the very best will stay till eligibility runs out. There i$ much more intere$t in college teams being good than the pro$. Boosters will pay BIG to brag.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bruce Kritzler View Post

                    That's funny, because many foreign collegians have already received compensation from their clubs/associations.
                    Really...like who....the Brits running in the US I am aware of haven't seen a pence from the UK.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Atticus View Post
                      Then the rich will simply get richer and they'll ensure they not only get the very best, but that the very best will stay till eligibility runs out. There i$ much more intere$t in college teams being good than the pro$. Boosters will pay BIG to brag.
                      I don't know that the best will make more from staying in college, but if they do stay they would have to be enrolled and school, so on the positive side maybe more of them would graduate. As KevinR mentioned, I would also guess that a lot of the athletes staying would be those drafted in 2nd or greater rounds, and hoping to get more development at the college level while still able to get something by marketing themselves.

                      As far as the rich getting richer it seems like that's already happening with Alabama, Ohio State, and Clemson without this system. Since many of their guys will still be good enough to leave early and get the enormous signing bonuses, this might be a way to break their stranglehold on the BCS with the remaining schools getting better player development.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Atticus View Post
                        How long before a huge scandal breaks when they find out boosters are paying big bucks for NIL merchandising.
                        Is this against the rules?

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                        • #13
                          Will there be some sort of “fair market value” for NIL? If not, some mega wealthy donor could simply buy an 8 x 10 color glossy of the Alabama quarterback for $5 million and there you go, the kid is $5 million richer.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by DrJay View Post
                            Will there be some sort of “fair market value” for NIL? If not, some mega wealthy donor could simply buy an 8 x 10 color glossy of the Alabama quarterback for $5 million and there you go, the kid is $5 million richer.
                            As I was saying, the Wild West era has begun. An Alabama recruit has already signed deals worth more than a million dollars before he even set a foot on campus.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Bruce Kritzler View Post

                              That's funny, because many foreign collegians have already received compensation from their clubs/associations.
                              Not the same I don't think, since it isn't being earned here.
                              Last edited by gm; 07-27-2021, 03:13 PM.

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