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  • Originally posted by player View Post



    Allen can be released by the Eagles at any time between now and the start of the regular season in September and they won't owe him anything, as long as he doesn't get hurt on the job. If he achieves the ultimate goal of playing in a regular season game, he will be paid at a rate of $750k per season, which is minimum. If he gets put on the practice squad again, he will be paid at a rate in the $200-300k/season range.
    Even within these numbers there's a lot of movement. For instance, if he's going to be a part of the 53 man roster and, in the Eagles minds a contributor for the full season they would have him on the 53 man roster for the first game which guarantees his full season salary. If they aren't sure what they would likely do is keep in on the PS until game 2 and they he gets paid basically on a per game basis of the pro rated value of his full season salary. He may alternate between PS and active roster all year long meaning he gets his PS salary for those weeks and his game check for those weeks.

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    • Originally posted by player View Post

      The reserve/futures contract Allen signed creates no real monetary obligation on the part of the Eagles and doesn't mean he will get $480k.

      Allen can be released by the Eagles at any time between now and the start of the regular season in September and they won't owe him anything, as long as he doesn't get hurt on the job. If he achieves the ultimate goal of playing in a regular season game, he will be paid at a rate of $750k per season, which is minimum. If he gets put on the practice squad again, he will be paid at a rate in the $200-300k/season range.

      The $480k figure you mention is on a schedule that, as a practical matter, applies to players placed on injured reserve. That is a designation NFL teams use for injured players they value enough to want to maintain their contractual control over. In the case of a marginal player like Allen, if he gets hurt on the practice field or in a game, he will likely be released with an injury settlement.
      Thanks for info. So is he getting a paycheck right now? Do you know the pay rate he's getting on a futures/reserve contract? Can he still compete in hurdles?

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      • Originally posted by DET59 View Post

        Thanks for info. So is he getting a paycheck right now? Do you know the pay rate he's getting on a futures/reserve contract? Can he still compete in hurdles?
        Nobody in the NFL is getting a paycheck right now. Players under contract get paid 1/18th of their annual salary each week of the season. The only possibility would be an odd bonus clause in a contract but they are usually limited payout upon signature and/or meeting some contractually stated requirement...such as showing up for workouts.

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        • Some freakish happenings at the NFL Combine:



          At 6-foot-4, 244 pounds, Richardson set combine records for a quarterback with a vertical jump of 40.5 inches and a broad jump of 10 feet, 9 inches. Richardson, in his only attempt, then uncorked an official clocking of 4.43 seconds in the 40-yard dash in Lucas Oil Field.

          You there, on the motorbike! Sell me one of your melons!

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          • Originally posted by scottmitchell74 View Post

            Some freakish happenings at the NFL Combine:

            At 6-foot-4, 244 pounds, Richardson set combine records for a quarterback with a vertical jump of 40.5 inches and a broad jump of 10 feet, 9 inches. Richardson, in his only attempt, then uncorked an official clocking of 4.43 seconds in the 40-yard dash in Lucas Oil Field.
            Amazing athleticism! On the other hand...

            Screen Shot 2023-03-04 at 7.10.32 PM.png

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            • It is true that many former track and field athletes have transitioned to playing professional football, with around 20 former Olympians having made the switch. However, despite this, there may be a lack of interest in the NFL among certain groups or regions.

              There could be various reasons for this, such as cultural or regional differences in sports preferences, lack of exposure to American football, or simply personal preferences for other sports. Additionally, while the NFL is a popular and lucrative league in the United States, it may not have the same level of global appeal as other sports such as soccer or basketball.

              The reasons for the lack of interest in the NFL may be complex and multifaceted, and can vary depending on individual perspectives and circumstances.
              Cross Country Running

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              • Originally posted by Davidokun View Post

                Amazing athleticism! On the other hand...

                Screen Shot 2023-03-04 at 7.10.32 PM.png
                Yikes.

                Wasn't Josh Allen a little light in that category once?

                That is poor but man that kind of athleticism is hard to ignore.
                You there, on the motorbike! Sell me one of your melons!

                Comment


                • Originally posted by edmondpogi View Post
                  It is true that many former track and field athletes have transitioned to playing professional football, with around 20 former Olympians having made the switch. However, despite this, there may be a lack of interest in the NFL among certain groups or regions.

                  There could be various reasons for this, such as cultural or regional differences in sports preferences, lack of exposure to American football, or simply personal preferences for other sports. Additionally, while the NFL is a popular and lucrative league in the United States, it may not have the same level of global appeal as other sports such as soccer or basketball.

                  The reasons for the lack of interest in the NFL may be complex and multifaceted, and can vary depending on individual perspectives and circumstances.
                  The best athletes gravitate to where the money is and most kids outside of North America don't have an opportunity to play American football. Ryan Crouser (6'7", 320 pounds) is an outlier and if he hadn't been born and raised in Oregon into a family steeped in throwing, he would no doubt be playing in the NFL and making a lot more money than he's making now.

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                  • Originally posted by jazzcyclist View Post

                    The best athletes gravitate to where the money is and most kids outside of North America don't have an opportunity to play American football. Ryan Crouser (6'7", 320 pounds) is an outlier and if he hadn't been born and raised in Oregon into a family steeped in throwing, he would no doubt be playing in the NFL and making a lot more money than he's making now.
                    I never heard of anyone in England ever mention they wanted to play American football. They play there but it is more of an oddity than an inspiration.

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                    • Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post

                      I never heard of anyone in England ever mention they wanted to play American football. They play there but it is more of an oddity than an inspiration.
                      There's a guy whose wife and children have competed for the local track and field club who played for a team about 30 years ago. I think it's very much an amateur sport here and the domestic game here has a lower profile than sports like basketball and ice hockey which rank well below rugby and cricket let alone soccer.

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                      • Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post

                        I never heard of anyone in England ever mention they wanted to play American football. They play there but it is more of an oddity than an inspiration.
                        That's my point. In North America, kids get an opportunity to play football when they're 8 or 9 years-old and most American high schools have a football team. Of the top 30 highest rated American TV programs of all times, 29 of them were football games. Of the 100 top rated TV programs of 2022, 87 of them were football games. In most of the world, kids don't have that same level of exposure and opportunity. American football is to British kids what cricket is to American kids.

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                        • Originally posted by edmondpogi View Post
                          It is true that many former track and field athletes have transitioned to playing professional football, with around 20 former Olympians having made the switch. However, despite this, there may be a lack of interest in the NFL among certain groups or regions.​
                          34 to be precise - http://www.olympedia.org/lists/100/manual

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                          • Originally posted by jazzcyclist View Post

                            That's my point. In North America, kids get an opportunity to play football when they're 8 or 9 years-old and most American high schools have a football team. Of the top 30 highest rated American TV programs of all times, 29 of them were football games. Of the 100 top rated TV programs of 2022, 87 of them were football games. In most of the world, kids don't have that same level of exposure and opportunity. American football is to British kids what cricket is to American kids.
                            The number of people in the UK who regularly watch the NFL on TV is probably more than the number of people here who have ever played the game.

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                            • It looks like DK Metcalf and Tariq Hill want to race the 100 but they can't agree on the terms. Metcalf wants to do it in April or May, at least 3 months before the start of football season,while Hill wants to do it right before the season starts. If Metcalf got his way, he could race 10-15 pounds lighter than his football weight and still have time to put the weight back on before the season starts and perhaps that's what Hill is worried about. Surprisingly, Metcalf said he weighed 240 for the Mt. Sac race. Here's an interview with Metcalf on Undisputed. The track related portion of the interview starts at 8:30.

                              (1) DK Metcalf joins Skip & Shannon to talk Seahawks, Geno Smth, NBA Playoffs & more | NFL | UNDISPUTED - YouTube

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                              • I have difficulty envisioning any 240-pound human outrunning Tariq Hill.

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