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Mary Cain files lawsuit against Nike & Salazar

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  • #46
    Originally posted by Atticus View Post
    Who also should have been cashiered long before they were.
    What is considered acceptable has, indeed, changed over the years. Setting aside the obvious emotions that have come out on this topic, it can actually be looked at much simpler. Salazar and Nike both had a professional working relationship with Mary. What they allowed to take place in that atmosphere was most definitely a hostile working environment, in which those with more power than she had the upper hand. Yes, she could have walked away, just as anyone else employed in a hostile environment can. But there are laws making that type of treatment unacceptable in the workplace.

    I agree that it will most likely be resolved outside of a courtroom, as most such cases are.

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    • #47
      Is there anything Salazar did that would be a problem outside the US? Would someone of Ms. Cain’s stature in Russia, China, the UK, France, Jamaica, or Germany expect a lot different?

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Tuariki View Post
        Was Salazar any more abusive to athletes than say Bobby Knight or Woody Hayes, and a host of others?
        Their athletes were older than Ms. Cain but otherwise it is an entirely legitimate question. Note, both were fired eventually for their tempers.

        I was at IU when Knight nearly got thrown in prison in Puerto Rico. His eventual demise was foretold.
        Last edited by Dave; 10-15-2021, 03:53 AM.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by Atticus View Post
          Who also should have been cashiered long before they were.
          Not fans of them, but they weren't coaching 17 year old girls!!

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          • #50
            For those interested, here is a link the filed complaint.

            https://www.scribd.com/document/5319...lberto-Salazar

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            • #51
              Originally posted by aaronk View Post
              Not fans of them, but they weren't coaching 17 year old girls!!
              Doesn't matter. Even the legendary Bear Bryant was way-over-the-line abusive at Tex A&M. Just because it was tolerated then does not mean it wasn't very, very wrong.
              When I was first commissioned, Chief initiations were barbaric and I did not tolerate it, for which I became a very unpopular junior officer . . . for a short period of time. They got over it.

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              • #52
                A kid on my HS track team walked over to the sprint coach (who was also one of the football coaches) with a little bit of a bloody scrape on his leg, asked the coach what he should do. The coach's priceless response, "Rub some dirt on it and get back out there!" The coach did not go running to the office for a first-aid kit or put his arm around the boy.

                My thought at the time was a) he was serious, and I actually imagined the kid bending down to get a handful of dirt, such is the malleable nature of the adolescent mind, and b) man, that coach was tough! and I wanted to be tough for him. If the coach said rub some dirt in it, even if I didn't grab some dirt, I certainly wasn't going to whine about anything unless it was quite severe. I tried hard to please my coach in HS, and I was a better runner for it. The head coach was a good man and a good coach.

                I now realize that the sprint coach was leveraging some humor at the time and knew that the kid could push through something like a scraped leg, or the kid could just take the initiative to go rinse it off on his own. He was also a good coach and a good man, but those things are lost on teenagers.

                Anyway, when I wanted my kids to toughen up I would sometimes jokingly say, "Rub some dirt on it!", mostly for my own entertainment and nostalgia.

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                • #53
                  I’lll repeat something I wrote when she was 18, she should have stayed in the NCAA for a while. She needed to grow up. She’d have been able to tellSalazar or any other coach to stuff it when appropriate after four years of college,

                  Others on this board were drooling at the thought of her turning pro. She was ready physically but not emotionally.

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Dave View Post
                    Is there anything Salazar did that would be a problem outside the US? Would someone of Ms. Cain’s stature in Russia, China, the UK, France, Jamaica, or Germany expect a lot different?
                    Would be surprised if young women would not expect rather different treatment in Germany, UK and France. In the Nordics where cross country skiing is a somewhat big sport, there has been a lot of discussions the last few years about the pressure to be weight conscious for young athletes (weight is a huge deal when you try to get up steep hills as fast as possible) based on how these discussions have panned out what Salazar seems to have done would for sure have been a problem. Likely even a very very big problem.

                    I don't wanna judge Salazar, I don't know enough about what took place or not. However it should be a safe assumption that this potentially would have been as big a deal in Western Europe as it is in the US.

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Steele View Post
                      I now realize that the sprint coach was leveraging some humor at the time and knew that the kid could push through something like a scraped leg, or the kid could just take the initiative to go rinse it off on his own. He was also a good coach and a good man, but those things are lost on teenagers.
                      The very real problem here is that does indeed work on some kids - laugh it off - after telling them to clean it off - you can get a staph infection from a track, but other kids won't process this 'humor' as efficiently and then you're down the rabbit-hole.
                      I was often very sarcastic with my best athletes, knowing that they understood my intent (wow, that was sooo gracefully done - care to try again?), but the rank-and-file athletes only saw my 'sweet' side.

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by Dave View Post
                        I’lll repeat something I wrote when she was 18, she should have stayed in the NCAA for a while. She needed to grow up. She’d have been able to tellSalazar or any other coach to stuff it when appropriate after four years of college,

                        Others on this board were drooling at the thought of her turning pro. She was ready physically but not emotionally.
                        I, too, would have preferred to see her in college a bit, but that decision was always up to her and her parents. But there is no way of knowing that more maturity would have given her the tools needed to walk away from Salazar's camp. What is clear, though is that a work environment should not permit this type bullying from leadership. There were some highly successful athletes in that group that would surely indicate it was acceptable to her. But there is substantial legal precedent that her coach's behavior was unacceptable.

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by KevinR View Post

                          I, too, would have preferred to see her in college a bit, but that decision was always up to her and her parents. But there is no way of knowing that more maturity would have given her the tools needed to walk away from Salazar's camp. What is clear, though is that a work environment should not permit this type bullying from leadership. There were some highly successful athletes in that group that would surely indicate it was acceptable to her. But there is substantial legal precedent that her coach's behavior was unacceptable.
                          The last sentence I agree with but it remains to be seen as to whether that is worth the cash to her.

                          I don't agree with the first part of the comments as at least a few of us questioned the situation she was going to end up in as a HSer moving 3000mi away from home with no apparent peer support system in place. Some details from the suit that I'm just learning about really make me question the decision even moreso.

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                          • #58
                            While we're on the subject of abusive coaches . . . .
                            You do not have permission to view this gallery.
                            This gallery has 1 photos.

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                            • #59
                              Originally posted by jazzcyclist View Post
                              While we're on the subject of abusive coaches . . . .
                              Did the dad / coach run laps with the kid?

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                              • #60
                                Originally posted by TN1965 View Post
                                Did the dad / coach run laps with the kid?
                                The coach probably just gave the dad a stern lecture. 😉

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