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body shaming at Oregon?

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  • TN1965
    replied
    Earlier on this thread, there are people who argued that:

    -- this happens at all major programs, not just at Oregon.
    -- this is necessary to squeeze the maximum performance out of athletes.

    The RW story debunks both of them. NC State and BYU (among others) have stopped body comp tests, and they are seeing the positive results. Does anyone think those two schools would be even more successful at women's cross country if they were still doing the body comp tests?

    Leave a comment:


  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by gm View Post
    I never had an athlete I coached who didn't know they were overweight/underweight, without me ever saying a word about it.
    Ditto. Virtually all my males wanted to hit the weights and gain muscle weight/strength.
    Females were much more problematic. Some loathed lifting weights for fear they would gain weight or look too muscular (as if!). I never TOLD a female what she should do about her weight, but I have ASKED females what they thought about their bodies vis-a-vis their events. The better they were at their event the less we discussed it. If a female was good about their weight, I dropped the subject. If they wanted to gain or lose weight, I coordinated with the weight coach to try to make it happen.

    If I were starting all over again,. I think I might just drop the whole subject. They will come to you if they want a change.

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  • TN1965
    replied
    Body Composition Testing - College Running Programs Moving Away From Body Comp Tests (runnersworld.com)

    In recent years, high-profile allegations about overuse or abuse of such measurements have arisen in running programs, including those at Oregon, Wesleyan University, and the University of Colorado, where results of an internal investigation into this and other team culture issues are expected later this month. Reports from student athletes, health professionals, and researchers suggest monitoring body composition has risks, and limited benefits.​

    Leave a comment:


  • scottmitchell74
    replied
    Originally posted by gm View Post

    The TESTS are inconsequential to their performance. I never had an athlete I coached who didn't know they were overweight/underweight, without me ever saying a word about it.

    It's another way to exercise control over athletes and the tests are unnecessary unless requested by an athlete or prescribed by a doctor.
    Yeah I see that. Men and women do think differently. I work with literally 99% men in a competitive job and we are all constantly interested in our body comp, fat%, resting metabolic rate, etc...so outside my wife and two daughters I don't have much contact with athletic females.



    Leave a comment:


  • 18.99s
    replied
    Originally posted by scottmitchell74 View Post
    inconsequential to their performance

    This whole thing is tricky because, for most sports, the above sentence is just not true, despite anyone's feelings on the matter.

    The entire athletic world is a grand experiment on this and the verdict is in: for most sports, the fitter and leaner you are (within certain perimeters) the better your performance.
    But there is a point where getting even leaner hurts performance, and that point is different for every athlete. Coaches shouldn't be telling their runners to match Sifan Hassan's bodyfat and BMI, because the optimal body composition for her isn't necessarily optimal for everybody else.

    Leave a comment:


  • gm
    replied
    Originally posted by scottmitchell74 View Post
    inconsequential to their performance

    This whole thing is tricky because, for most sports, the above sentence is just not true, despite anyone's feelings on the matter.

    The entire athletic world is a grand experiment on this and the verdict is in: for most sports, the fitter and leaner you are (within certain perimeters) the better your performance.
    The TESTS are inconsequential to their performance. I never had an athlete I coached who didn't know they were overweight/underweight, without me ever saying a word about it.

    It's another way to exercise control over athletes and the tests are unnecessary unless requested by an athlete or prescribed by a doctor.

    Leave a comment:


  • scottmitchell74
    replied
    inconsequential to their performance

    This whole thing is tricky because, for most sports, the above sentence is just not true, despite anyone's feelings on the matter.

    The entire athletic world is a grand experiment on this and the verdict is in: for most sports, the fitter and leaner you are (within certain perimeters) the better your performance.

    Leave a comment:


  • wamego relays champ
    replied
    It might be behind paywall, but this NY Times story today describes how the body-shaming issue is not isolated to Oregon, but can be found at many programs nationwide.

    Female College Athletes Say Pressure to Cut Body Fat Is Toxic


    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/11/10/s...fat-women.html

    The New York Times spoke with nearly 20 female current and former athletes across the Power 5 conferences, many of whom have found body composition tests to be invasive, inconsequential to their performance, and triggering for those who had eating disorders or were predisposed to them. The tests are just one aspect of a culture in women’s college sports in which weight, body image and body composition are often discussed in harmful ways — or not discussed at all, even though they are important factors in the athletes’ physical and mental health.
    Last edited by wamego relays champ; 11-10-2022, 06:24 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Big Tusk
    replied
    Originally posted by Atticus View Post
    I don't recommend my 'diet', but I'm healthy and happy now.
    Sending prayers your way, big guy. This board will be a darker place after your departure.

    Leave a comment:


  • 18.99s
    replied
    Originally posted by Dave View Post

    Oregon/Nike’s error was in believing that they had the technology to determine that optimal weight where strength would not be compromised. That would seem to be a very fertile area for sports medicine research.
    And they failed to recognize that the optimal weight and bodyfat for one athlete might be very wrong for another athlete with the same/similar height.

    Look at David Oliver and Aries Merritt, for example. Only 2 inches difference in height, but 50 lbs difference in weight. If either tried to bulk up or slim down to acquire the other's build, they'd be miserable and perform miserably.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dave
    replied
    Originally posted by Atticus View Post

    and obviously, there are many 'optimal weights' for everyone, depending on what they want to do.

    …..
    Oregon/Nike’s error was in believing that they had the technology to determine that optimal weight where strength would not be compromised. That would seem to be a very fertile area for sports medicine research.

    Leave a comment:


  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by Dave View Post
    I suspect there is a lot of room left to really understand optimal weight for athletes and the trade offs.
    and obviously, there are many 'optimal weights' for everyone, depending on what they want to do.

    I was very happy with my weight 3 months ago, got sick, lost 15 pounds, and now I am very happy with that weight now. Plus now I can eat whatever I want and not gain a pound. I don't recommend my 'diet', but I'm healthy and happy now.
    Last edited by Atticus; 12-22-2021, 08:44 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dave
    replied
    So, it is not just female athletes who are under pressure to keep their weight down. https://www.cnn.com/2021/12/21/sport...cmd/index.html

    I suspect there is a lot of room left to really understand optimal weight for athletes and the trade offs.

    Leave a comment:


  • Atticus
    replied
    Originally posted by Conor Dary View Post
    And as usual you completely missed the important point.
    The ad hominems should be beneath your dignity.

    Leave a comment:


  • br
    replied

    British runner Phily Bowden on why she quit leading athletics programme (Oregon) in latest controversy that could have serious implications for Nike

    'I confided that I had an eating disorder – they told me to lose three pounds'

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/athletic...-three-pounds/

    “The initial conversation of ‘here are your results’ was coupled with ‘let’s try to get a couple of per cent off that fat percentage and maybe cut a couple of pounds at the same time’,” Bowden, now 26, tells Telegraph Sport. “That’s not what I was expecting to hear.”

    Leave a comment:

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