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Why is India so bad in sports?

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  • Why is India so bad in sports?

    A billion people and not many medals. Why is this. Culture? Genetics? Money? Organization?

  • #2
    http://www.hinduonnet.com/tss/tss2738/s ... 300800.htm
    There are no strings on me

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    • #3
      great link

      guru, thanks for the great link. I have a feeling that we'll start seeing improvement from India in the near future.

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      • #4
        Re: great link

        Originally posted by BillVol
        guru, thanks for the great link. I have a feeling that we'll start seeing improvement from India in the near future.
        Not if they focus on shooting and weightlifting, as this article suggests. (Well, they'll get the medals, but "we" won't see them if by "we" you mean track fans.) They also need to focus on athletics as an every-year sport with important international and regional competition, not just as part of the Olympics and other quadrennial multi-sport Games, as this article seems to be doing.

        But I think the short answer to your original question probably has more to do with the country's widespread poverty and all of its negative effects (poor nutrition, lack of time or money for leisure activities, etc) than anything else. I suspect that for too many of their billion people, participation in athletics is not really possible.

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        • #5
          Re: great link

          Originally posted by tandfman
          I suspect that for too many of their billion people, participation in athletics is not really possible.
          That's a stat I would like to see: track facilities per capita. In greater Jax (pop 1,000,000) there are probably 30 T&F facilities (1 college, 1 JC, 28 HSs, zero non-school-related). I would think a place like Boston has lots more. Britain, Sweden, Germany? Africa? Asia? S. America? Canada? China?

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          • #6
            I wish India all the best in its sports progression. I hope women are given the opportunites they deserve

            The beautiful city of Vancouver, host of the 2010 Olympics, does not have a single decent rubberized track. Not one.

            How pathetic is that.

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            • #7
              Re: great link

              Originally posted by tafnut
              Originally posted by tandfman
              I suspect that for too many of their billion people, participation in athletics is not really possible.
              That's a stat I would like to see: track facilities per capita. In greater Jax (pop 1,000,000) there are probably 30 T&F facilities (1 college, 1 JC, 28 HSs, zero non-school-related). I would think a place like Boston has lots more. Britain, Sweden, Germany? Africa? Asia? S. America? Canada? China?
              In the Metro DC area, I've noticed a lack of them as well - certainly less than I remember in the Pittsburgh area where I grew up, particularly when given the size disparity between the two. It may be indicative, ironically, of the prep football culture of Western PA, since it brings about spectacular, up-to-date stadia at every semi-large school.

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              • #8
                maybe if athletic coaching missionaries were sent we could convert them into T&F lovers.

                Have an adopt an indian T&F fan programme, to back it up.

                But do not show them cricket bats and balls, that would be so counter productive!
                Good old british common sense!

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                • #9
                  Nike

                  Nike is now manufacturing the kits for the Indian soccer team. This Joga Bonito brochure is funny because they make it sound like every team in there has the potential to win the World Cup.

                  For India, the caption reads:

                  INDIA: FOR A COUNTRY AWAKENING TO THE JOY OF FOOTBALL, POPULARITY BREEDS POTENTIAL

                  The second-most populous country in the world, India is football's sleeping giant. Not only is it obsessed with the game (and with sport in general), but its rich tradition of artistry and creativity is poised to bear fruit on the pitch. Indeed, India's players already possess individual skills that belie their team's results. With a little more seasoning, it appears that India's transition from perpetual hopeful to potential contender may not be long in coming.
                  I don't want to criticize their culture. Maybe it's better than the western culture. But let's face it: They aren't ever going to be squat in sports. [/quote]

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                  • #10
                    Delhi 2010 CWG weightlfting.... will be SCARY

                    You only had to see that they had 3x60m discus throwing woman at the CWG who no one had seen before, this is after their best one got banned to realise that they could be a potent force in female athletics soon.

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                    • #11
                      Re: great link

                      Originally posted by tandfman
                      But I think the short answer to your original question probably has more to do with the country's widespread poverty and all of its negative effects (poor nutrition, lack of time or money for leisure activities, etc) than anything else.
                      That could be said for many countries that are successful in T&F (think Africa, Central & South America, Caribbean, etc.). Of course poverty is not helping, but it is not what is keeping India off of the international T&F scene.

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